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Encyclopedia > Connection between Poles and Vandals

In the Middle Ages and later there persisted a common false belief that the Vandals were ancestors of Poles or Slavic peoples. That belief originated probably because of two facts: first, confusion of the Venedes with Vandals and secondly, because both Venedes and Vandals in ancient times lived in areas later settled by Poles. In 796 in the Annales Alamanici one can find an excerpt saying Pipinus ... perrexit in regionem Wandalorum, et ipsi Wandali venerunt obvium ("Pippen went to regions of Vandals and the Vandals came to meet him"). In Annales Sangallenses the same raid (however put in 795 is summarised in one short message Wandali conquisiti sunt ("Vandals were destroyed")). This means that early medieval writers gave the name of Vandals to Avars. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century and created a state in North Africa, centered on the city of Carthage. ... The Slavic peoples are defined by their linguistic attainment of the Slavic languages. ... Venedes is the term used in a number of ancient texts, starting with Tacitus, to describe an ethnic group living (presumably) in Central Europe. ... Events December - Coenwulf becomes king of Mercia. ... Events Leo III becomes pope Earliest recorded Viking raid on Ireland. ... The Eurasian Avars were a nomadic people of Eurasia who migrated into central and eastern Europe in the 6th century. ...


Very soon after that in chronicles the name "Vandal" started to mean "Slavs" (eg. in the same Annales Alamanici about a raid of Charlemagne in the country of the Polabian Slavs: perrexit in regionem Wandalorum). In 1056 Annales Augustani mentioned defeat of Germans with Slavic Lucics (?) as exercitus Saxonum a Wandalis trucidatur ("an army of Saxons is destroyed by Vandals"). In the chronicle of Adam of Bremen there is a longer sentence: Charlemagne (742 or 747 – 28 January 814) (also Charles the Great; from Latin, Carolus Magnus or Karolus Magnus), son of King Pippin the Short and Bertrada of Laon, was the king of the Franks from 768 to 814 and king of the Lombards from 774 to 814. ... The Polabian language was a group of Slavic dialects spoken in present-day northern Germany: Mecklenburg, Brandenburg, Saxony-Anhalt, eastern parts of Lower Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein. ... Events Anselm of Canterbury leaves Italy. ... Adam of Bremen (also: Adam Bremensis) was one of the most important German medieval chroniclers. ...

Sclavania igitur, amplissima Germaniae provintia, a Winulis incolitur, qui olim dicti sum Wandali; decies maior esse fertur nostra Saxonia, presertim si Boemiam et eos, qui trans Oddaram sunt, Polanos, quaia nec habitu nec lingua discrepant, in partem adiecreris Sclavaniae

that is: "Slavania (Slavic lands), the biggest from Germanic countries, is inhabited by Winnils, who were formerly called Vandals. It is supposed to be bigger than our Saxony, especially when it would include Bohemians and Polans across the Oder, since they are no different in customs and language".


In 983-993 Gerhard of Augsburg in Miracula Sancti Oudalrici (about saint Udalric) called Mieszko I dux Wandalorum, Misico nomine. Reign From c. ...


Probably the first man who directly mentioned supposedly Vandalic roots of Poland was the Polish chronicler Wincenty Kadlubek in the 12th century, who wrote that Poles were once called Vandals, because they live next to the river Vandalus (Vistula), and that river received its name from the mythical queen Vanda who committed suicide by drowning in it. A similar story was told by the author of Wielkopolska chronicle from the 14th century, and then Dzierzwa from Krakow in the 14th century, who tried to give Slavic etymology to all known Vandalic names, like deriving Vanda from węda, that is fishing-rod. Wincenty Kadłubek, also known as Vincent Kadlubek, Vincent Kadlubo, Vincent Kadlubko, Vincent of Cracow. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... The Vistula (Polish: WisÅ‚a) is the longest river in Poland. ... Species See text Vanda W. Jones ex R. Br. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... This article needs cleanup. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ...


In 12th century also Gerwazy from Tilbury, English writer in Otia imperialia wrote that citizens of Poland are called and are calling themselves Vandals. Similar thoughts gave German historian Albert Krantz (1450-1517) in Wandalia sive historia de Wandalorum vera origine, variis gentibus, crebris a aptria migrationibus, regnis item, etc where who consequently connected history of ancient Vandals and Slavs. The same was repeated by Falvio Blondi from Italy, and then Maciej Miechowita in Tractatus de duabus Sarmatiis... from 1517. Other arguments that Vandals were Polish ancestors were supplied by Marcin Bielski in 15th century. The first Polish historian to deny any connection to Vandals and to criticise that idea was Marcin Kromer, bishop of Warmia, author of De origine et rebus gestis Polonorum from 1555. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Events March - French troops under Guy de Richemont besiege the English commander in France, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, in Caen April 15 - Battle of Formigny. ... Events January 22 - Battle of Ridanieh. ... Maciej Miechowita Maciej Miechowita (also known as Maciej z Miechowa, Maciej of Miechów, Maciej Karpiga, Matthias de Miechow) (1457 - 8 September 1523) was a Polish renaissance scholar, professor of Jagiellonian University, historian, chronicler, geographer, medical doctor (royal physician of king Zygmunt I the Old of Poland), alchemist[1], astrologist... Events January 22 - Battle of Ridanieh. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Portrait Marcin Kromer (1512-1589) was a 16th century bishop of Warmia, cartographer, diplomat, and historian in Poland and later in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... Warmia in 1547 Warmia (Polish: , German: , Latin: Varmia, also historically known as Ermeland) is a region between Pomerania and Masuria in northeastern Poland. ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ...


External links

  • List of toponyms in Poland beginning with Wand-, Want-, Wank, etc.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Connection between Poles and Vandals (500 words)
In 1056 Annales Augustani mentioned defeat of Germans with Slavic Lucics[?] (?) as exercitus Saxonum a Wandalis trucidatur ("an army of Saxons is destroyed by Vandals").
Other arguments that Vandals were Polish ancestors were supplied by Marcin Bielski in 15th century.
The first Polish historian to deny any connection to Vandals and to criticise that idea was Marcin Cromer[?], bishop of Warmia, author of De origine et rebus gestis Polonorum from 1555.
Connection between Poles and Vandals - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (526 words)
In the Middle Ages and later there persisted a common false belief that the Vandals were ancestors of Poles or Slavic peoples.
In 1056 Annales Augustani mentioned defeat of Germans with Slavic Lucics (?) as exercitus Saxonum a Wandalis trucidatur ("an army of Saxons is destroyed by Vandals").
The first Polish historian to deny any connection to Vandals and to criticise that idea was Marcin Kromer, bishop of Warmia, author of De origine et rebus gestis Polonorum from 1555.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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