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Encyclopedia > Connecticut Turnpike

Gov. John Davis Lodge Turnpike
Renamed from Connecticut Turnpike in 1985
Maintained by Connecticut DOT
Length: 128.47 mi (206.75 km)
Formed: 1958
West end: I-95 at the New York state line in Greenwich
Major
junctions:
US 7 in Norwalk
Routes 8 and 25 in Bridgeport
I-91 and Route 34 in New Haven
Route 9 in Old Saybrook
I-95 in East Lyme
Route 2 in Norwich
I-395 in Plainfield
East end: US 6 near the Rhode Island state line in Killingly

The Connecticut Turnpike, more currently known as the Governor John Davis Lodge Turnpike, is a freeway in Connecticut that runs from Byram to South Killingly. It is signed as Interstate 95 from the New York state line to East Lyme, and then as Interstate 395 from East Lyme to Killingly. A short unnumbered freeway (unsigned State Road 695) continues the Turnpike to the Rhode Island state line. The Turnpike is 128.47 miles (206.84 km) long (88.48 miles (142.45 km) on Interstate 95, 35.50 miles (57.15 km) on Interstate 395, and 4.49 miles (7.23 km) on State Road 695)[1] and carries an annual average daily traffic of over 150,000 in some sections west of New Haven.[2] Image File history File links Conn_Tpk. ... Image File history File links I-95. ... Image File history File links I-395. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... km redirects here. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links I-95. ... Interstate 95, the major Interstate Highway along the East Coast of the United States, runs 23. ... NY redirects here. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Settled 1640 Joined Connecticut 1656 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman James A. Lash  - Town administrator Edward Gomeau  - Town meeting moderator Thomas J. Byrne Area  - City 174. ... Image File history File links US_7. ... Original-style Vermont US 7 shield with embossed features United States Highway 7 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 309 miles (497 km) from northern Vermont to Norwalk, Connecticut. ... Motto: The Right Place, The Right Time Location in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Incorporated 1651 Consolidated 1913 Government type Mayor-council Mayor Dick Moccia Area    - City 36. ... Image File history File links Connecticut_Highway_8. ... Image File history File links Connecticut_Highway_25. ... Route 8 is a 67. ... Route 25 is a 28. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region Greater Bridgeport Incorporated (town) 1821 Incorporated (city) 1836 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor John M. Fabrizi Area  - City 19. ... Image File history File links I-91. ... Image File history File links Connecticut_Highway_34. ... Interstate 91 (abbreviated I-91) is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ... Route 25 is a 28. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA New Haven Region South Central Region Settled 1638 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1895 Government  - Type Mayor-board of aldermen  - Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ... Image File history File links Connecticut_Highway_9. ... Route 9 is a 40. ... Old Saybrook is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. ... Image File history File links I-95. ... Interstate 95, the main north-south Interstate Highway on the East Coast of the United States, runs in a general east-west compass direction for 111. ... East Lyme is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ... Image File history File links Connecticut_Highway_2. ... Route 2 is 58. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Image File history File links I-395. ... The 67 mile long north-south Interstate 395 begins at Interstate 95 near Waterford, Connecticut and ends at Interstate 90 in Auburn, Massachusetts. ... Plainfield is a town located in Windham County, Connecticut. ... Image File history File links US_6. ... U.S. Route 6 is a major east-west road in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... Official language(s) English Capital Providence Largest city Providence Area  Ranked 50th  - Total 1,214* [1] sq mi (3,144* km²)  - Width 37 miles (60 km)  - Length 48 miles (77 km)  - % water 32. ... Killingly is a town in Windham County, Connecticut, United States. ... For specific systems, such as the Autobahns of Germany, see list of highway systems with full control of access and no cross traffic. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Greenwich is a town located in Fairfield County, Connecticut. ... Killingly is a town in Windham County, Connecticut, United States. ... Interstate 95, the main north-south Interstate Highway on the East Coast of the United States, runs in a general east-west compass direction for 111. ... Interstate 395 (abbreviated I-395) is a 67-mile-long north-south interstate highway that begins at Interstate 95 in East Lyme, Connecticut and ends at Interstate 90 in Auburn, Massachusetts, where it becomes Interstate 290. ... State Road 695 (SR 695) is a freeway in Plainfield and Killingly, Connecticut that is the northeasternmost section of the Connecticut Turnpike and connects Interstate 395 with US 6 at the Connecticut/Rhode Island state line. ... Interstate 95, the main north-south Interstate Highway on the East Coast of the United States, runs in a general east-west compass direction for 111. ... Interstate 395 (abbreviated I-395) is a 67-mile-long north-south interstate highway that begins at Interstate 95 in East Lyme, Connecticut and ends at Interstate 90 in Auburn, Massachusetts, where it becomes Interstate 290. ... State Road 695 (SR 695) is a freeway in Plainfield and Killingly, Connecticut that is the northeasternmost section of the Connecticut Turnpike and connects Interstate 395 with US 6 at the Connecticut/Rhode Island state line. ... City nickname: The Elm City Location in the state of Connecticut Founded April 24, 1638 County New Haven County Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ...


Most of the signage identifying the route as a "unified road" has been taken down in recent years. The easternmost section of the turnpike (SR 695) is not signed except as a connection between I-395 and U.S. Route 6. Connecticut Turnpike trailblazers can still be found, although there are very few in existence today. One of the original Connecticut Turnpike trailblazers can be seen while driving along Center Street in Southport. Route 6 is the portion of the cross-country U.S. Route 6 within the state of Connecticut. ...

Contents

History

The general route and construction of the Turnpike were both mandated by state law.[3] Intended to relieve congestion on U.S. Route 1 and Route 15 (the Merritt & Wilbur Cross parkways), design work began in 1954. The Connecticut Turnpike opened on January 2, 1958[4]; however, the westernmost portion of the highway (the three miles (5 km) connecting Greenwich with the New England Thruway) opened ten months later. Tolls were originally collected through a series of eight toll booths along the route. The state stopped collecting tolls on all portions of the Turnpike by December 31, 1985. This U.S. Highway article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject U.S. Highways. ... Route 15 (CT-15) is a highway in Connecticut that runs 83. ... Merritt Parkway in autumn. ... The Wilbur Cross Parkway is a limited access highway in Connecticut, comprising the portion of Route 15 between Milford and Meriden. ... Harden Parkway in Salinas, CA. For other uses, see Parkway (disambiguation). ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Settled 1640 Joined Connecticut 1656 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman James A. Lash  - Town administrator Edward Gomeau  - Town meeting moderator Thomas J. Byrne Area  - City 174. ... The New England Thruway is a portion of the U.S. Interstate highway system and of the New York State Thruway, within and operated by the state of New York, and linking New York City with New England, specifically with southwestern Connecticut. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ...


Local legend is the initial phase of Turnpike construction in 1954 was so disruptive in heavily Republican Fairfield County that local voters there turned on incumbent Republican Governor John Davis Lodge, leading to his defeat by Abraham Ribicoff.[1] Fairfield County is the name of several counties in the United States: Fairfield County, Connecticut Fairfield County, Ohio Fairfield County, South Carolina This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... John Davis Lodge (October 20, 1903 – October 29, 1985) was a Republican, was governor of Connecticut from 1951 to 1955. ... Abraham Ribicoff Abraham Alexander Ribicoff (April 9, 1910–February 22, 1998) was an American politician. ...


Accidents

Several accidents prompted the state to eliminate tolls along the turnpike altogether. Arguably the most notorious of these was a serious incident in 1983 in which a truck collided with three cars at a toll plaza, killing seven people (including the truck driver) and injuring several others. The investigation following the crash determined that the truck driver had fallen asleep at the wheel just before the crash took place. . ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ...


The turnpike was renamed for former Governor John Davis Lodge soon afterward. John Davis Lodge (October 20, 1903 – October 29, 1985) was a Republican, was governor of Connecticut from 1951 to 1955. ...


In another infamous 1983 accident, a section of the turnpike's Mianus River Bridge in Greenwich collapsed due to corrosion of its substructure, killing three motorists crossing it at the time. The Mianus River Bridge on Interstate 95 in the Cos Cob section of Greenwich, Connecticut is famous for the collapse of a 100-foot deck of its eastbound span on June 28, 1983. ...


On March 25, 2004 a tanker truck carrying fuel swerved to avoid a car that cut the truck off and subsequently overturned, dumping 8,000 gallons of home heating oil onto the Howard Avenue overpass in Bridgeport. Passing vehicles kicked up the oil which ignited a towering inferno that subsequently melted the bridge structure and caused the southbound lanes to sag several feet. The northbound lanes, which received less damage from the fire, were opened five days later after being reinforced with temporary scaffolding. The southbound lanes opened on April 1, after a temporary bridge was erected.


Relieving gridlock

I-95 in Stamford.
I-95 in Stamford.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2037 KB) I took this pic and release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2037 KB) I took this pic and release it into the public domain. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ...

Turnpike Upgrades Stalled by Budget Deficits, Lawsuits

The Connecticut Turnpike opened southwest Connecticut to a mass migration of New Yorkers, leading to substantial residential and economic growth in Fairfield and New Haven Counties. The Turnpike became a primary commuter route to New York City. With additional segments of I-95 opening in the 1960s connecting to Providence and Boston, the Turnpike became an essential route for transporting people and goods throughout the Northeast. As a result, much of the Turnpike had become functionally obsolete by 1965, with traffic exceeding its design capacity. There were dozens of plans discussed to alleviate traffic congestion and improve safety on the Turnpike for nearly 30 years, but most of these plans languished amid political infighting and lawsuits brought on by special-interest groups. Still, traffic and deadly accidents continued to increase each year on the Turnpike, and by the 1990s the Connecticut Turnpike had started to become known as "The Highway of Death."


Finally, while most of the Turnpike is signed as Interstates 95 and 395, the highway was designed and built before the Interstate Highway System was established. As a result, much of the Turnpike does not meet Interstate standards, particularly with underpasses ranging from 13.5 feet to 15 feet (Interstate standards require 16 feet of vertical clearance). Interchanges are too closely spaced; ramps and acceleration/deceleration lanes need to be lengthened. In some areas, median and shoulder widths and curve radii also fall short of Interstate standards.


Complicating efforts to upgrade the Turnpike to Interstate standards is the fact that engineers did not acquire enough Right-of-Way to accommodate future expansion when the Connecticut Turnpike was built during the late 1950s. This means adjacent land must be seized to upgrade the Turnpike, resulting in lengthy and costly legal battles between the State of Connecticut and landowners refusing to give up their property. Finally, the Turnpike was built through environmentally-sensitive ecosystems and wetlands associated with Long Island Sound, meaning most expansion projects require lengthy environmental impact studies that are able to withstand constant litigation by environmental groups. In 2000 one CONNDOT official commented during a public meeting on expanding Interstate 84, "If we had tried to build I-95 today, it would be impossible because of the environment it passes through. It would never get approved." New York City waterways: 1. ... Interstate 84 is the designation of two interstate highways in the United States. ...


Bridge Collapse Jumpstarts Turnpike Upgrades

A comprehensive plan to address safety and capacity issues on the Connecticut Turnpike did not progress beyond the initial planning stages until the collapse of the Mianus River Bridge on June 28, 1983. Following the collapse, governor William A. O'Neill initiated an $8 billion program to rehabilitate Connecticut's highways. Included in this program was the inspection and repair of the Turnpike's nearly 300 bridges and overpasses. Furthermore, Governor O'Neill directed the Connecticut Department of Transportation to develop a viable plan for addressing safety and congestion on the state's roads. The Mianus River Bridge on Interstate 95 in the Cos Cob section of Greenwich, Connecticut is famous for the collapse of a 100-foot deck of its eastbound span on June 28, 1983. ...


High-Priority Status for Connecticut Turnpike

Throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s Connecticut Department of Transportation developed a comprehensive plan to improve the Turnpike through Fairfield and New Haven Counties. In 1993 CONNDOT embarked on a 25-year multibillion dollar program to upgrade the Connecticut Turnpike from the Connecticut River at Saybrook to the New York State line at Greenwich. The program included the complete reconstruction of several Turnpike segments, including replacing bridges, adding travel lanes, reconfiguring interchanges, upgrading lighting and signage, and implementing the Intelligent Transportation System with traffic cameras and variable message signs. Since the start of the program, a 6-mile section through Bridgeport was completely rebuilt to Interstate standards. Work is currently underway on a long-term $2 billion program to rebuild 12 miles (20 km) of turnpike between West Haven and Branford including a new extradosed Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge over New Haven Harbor. The Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT) is responsible for the development and operation of highways, railroads, mass transit systems, ports, waterways and aviation facilities in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A variable (also changeable, electronic, or dynamic) message sign, often abbreviated VMS or CMS, is an electronic traffic sign often used on roadways to give travelers information about special events. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region Greater Bridgeport Incorporated (town) 1821 Incorporated (city) 1836 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor John M. Fabrizi Area  - City 19. ... West Haven is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... Academy in Branford. ... The Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge, known locally as the Q Bridge, is a bridge that carries Interstate 95 (Connecticut Turnpike) over the mouth of the Quinnipiac River in New Haven, Connecticut. ...


Plans to upgrade the Turnpike received a boost in 2005 when federal legislation known as SAFETEA-LU designated the I-95 portion of the Connecticut Turnpike from the New York State Line to Waterford as High Priority Corridor 65. Corridor 65 also includes the 22-mile section of I-95 from Waterford to the Rhode Island state line that was built in 1964, and which is not part of the Turnpike. The Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU), which governs United States federal surface transporation spending through 2010, was signed into law by President George W. Bush in Montgomery, Illinois on August 10, 2005. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Interstate 95 in Connecticut. ...


Plans for the I-395/CT-695 Section

Traffic is relatively light on the rural I-395 section and the northeast leg (Connecticut Route 695) in Killingly; this section is largely unchanged from its original 1958 profile. The only major project planned on this section is the reconstruction of the northbound on and off ramps at Exit 80 in Norwich. Aside from minor spot improvements, no other major projects are anticipated for this portion of the Turnpike. State Road 695 (SR 695) is a freeway in Plainfield and Killingly, Connecticut that is the northeasternmost section of the Connecticut Turnpike and connects Interstate 395 with US 6 at the Connecticut/Rhode Island state line. ...


Improvement projects

  • Raymond Baldwin Bridge Replacement (Connecticut River), Old Saybrook (to Old Lyme): $460 million, completed in 1994
  • Saugatuck River Bridge Replacement, Westport: $65 million, completed in 1996
  • Lake Saltonstall Bridge Widening, East Haven: $50 million, completed in 1997
  • Widening/reconstruction Exits 8-10, Stamford: $80 million, completed in 2000
  • Reconstruction of Interchange 40, Milford: $30 million, completed in 2002
  • Reconstruction of Interchange 41, Orange: $60 million, completed in 2000
  • Reconstruction/widening Exits 23-30, Bridgeport: $570 million, completed in 2006 (two years behind schedule and $170 million over budget) (NOTE 1)
  • Widening between Exits 51 to 54, East Haven/Branford: $86 million, completed in 2006
  • Widening between Exits 51 and 49 (NOTE 2), East Haven/New Haven: $70 million, started in 2005, anticipated completion in 2009
  • Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge Replacement, New Haven: $490 million, expected start 2008, expected completion 2014 (NOTE 3)
  • I-91/Route 34 Interchange Reconstruction, New Haven: $270 million, started in 2004, expected completion in 2014
  • Interchange 42 reconstruction, West Haven: $36 million, started in 2003, anticipated completion in 2007
  • Housatonic River Bridge replacement, Milford/Stratford: $126 million, expected start in 2009, expected completion in 2012
  • West River Bridge replacement and widening (including reconstructing Exit 44 and removing Exit 45), New Haven: $100 million, expected start in 2008, expected completion in 2013
  • Widening between Exits 10 and 13, Darien: $35 million, expected start in 2008, expected completion in 2010
  • Widening between Exits 13 and 16 (including replacement of Norwalk River Bridge), Norwalk: Cost TBD, start time TBD, expected completion TBD
  • Widening/reconstruction Exits 45 to 47 (Long Wharf Section), New Haven: $200-500 million, expected start in 2013, expected completion in 2017
  • Reconfigure northbound ramps at Exit 80, Norwich: $6 million, expected start: TBA, expected completion: TBA
  • Reconfigure the I-95/I-395/US 1 interchange to accommodate the future Route 11 expressway, Waterford: Cost TBD, start time TBD, expected completion TBD.
  • Add a travel lane in each direction from Branford to Waterford: $1.0 billion, start time TBD, expected completion TBD.
  • Reconstruction and widening Exits 6-8, Stamford: Cost TBD, expected start TBD, expected completion TBD.
  • In addition CONNDOT has been reconstructing the median of the Turnpike in stages, replacing the pre-existing steel guiderail and grass divider with a 6-foot wide, 48-inch tall Jersey Barrier along the highway's length from the Baldwin Bridge to the New York State line.
  1. Exit 49 was permanently closed in October 2006 as part of this project.
  2. The southbound offramp and northbound onramp for Exit 28 were removed in 2000 during reconstruction of the Connecticut Turnpike in Bridgeport.
  3. Replacement of the Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge in New Haven was planned to start in 2007. Due to the rising cost of materials however, there were no contractors interested in the project when it was advertised for bid in 2006. CONNDOT has since broken the project up into several smaller contracts, with the first contracts scheduled for bid in October 2007.

Interstate 91 (abbreviated I-91) is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ... Route 34 (CT-34) is 24. ... United States Highway 1 is a United States highway which parallels the east coast of the United States. ... Route 11 is a state highway in east-central Connecticut, serving traffic between the Hartford and New London areas (via Route 2). ...

Too Many Exits?

The close spacing of interchanges (more than 90 along the Turnpike's 129-mile length) has been cited as a major cause of the problems that plague the Turnpike today. Chronic congestion and the highway's high accident rate results from the high frequency of weaving and sudden acceleration and deceleration of vehicles entering and leaving the Turnpike. The state Transportation Strategy Board has proposed removing several interchanges and revising most of the remaining to mitigate these conditions. Some officials have suggested installing ramp meters at busier interchanges to regulate the flow of traffic onto the highway. The proposal for removing interchanges has been met with opposition, as no city or town through which the Turnpike passes wants to lose access to the highway. Nonetheless, CONNDOT has been proceeding with some of the Strategy Board's recommendations. In 1999 the southbound off-ramp and northbound on-ramp at Interchange 28 in Bridgeport were removed. Seven years later, in October 2006 CONNDOT permanently closed Exit 49 with the opening of a new connector road at Exit 50. Current plans call for Exit 45 to be removed in 2009, while Exit 20 in Fairfield and Exits 35 and 37 in Milford are also proposed to be closed permanently. More recent plans also include consolidating Exits 21, 22, and 23 in Fairfield by either removing one or more of the interchanges or by tying them together using collector/distributor roads. Metered Ramp A ramp meter or metering light is a device, usually a basic traffic light or a two-phase (red and green, no yellow) light together with a signal controller, that regulates the flow of traffic entering freeways according to current traffic conditions. ... The Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT) is responsible for the development and operation of highways, railroads, mass transit systems, ports, waterways and aviation facilities in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... A collector/distributor road, often abbreviated as C/D road, is a one-way road next to a freeway that is used for some or all of the ramps that would otherwise merge into or split from the main lanes of the freeway. ...


Reinstatement of tolls?

Tolls on the Turnpike have been a source of controversy from the Turnpike's opening in 1958 to the removal of tolls in 1985, and the debate continues today. The Connecticut Turnpike originally opened with a barrier toll system (or open system), unlike toll roads in neighboring states, which used a ticket system (closed system) for collecting tolls. Tolls on the Connecticut Turnpike were located in Greenwich, Norwalk, Stratford, West Haven, East Haven, Madison, Montville, and Plainfield. Additionally, unlike other toll roads which featured widely-spaced interchanges, the Connecticut Turnpike has over 90 interchanges along its 129-mile length--50 of which are along the 50-mile stretch between the New York State line and New Haven. A Barrier Toll System (also known as an Open Toll System) is a method of collecting tolls on highways using toll barriers at regularly-spaced intervals on the toll roads mainline. ... A ticket system toll road, as opposed to a flat-rate toll road, is utilized by some state toll road or highway agencies that allows a motorist, who enters the highway at an exit, to pay a toll rate based on the number of miles traveled to their destination exit. ...


Connecticut abolishes tolls

After the 1983 truck crash that killed 7 people at the Stratford toll plaza, toll opponents pressured the State of Connecticut to remove tolls from the Turnpike in 1985. Three years later, these same opponents successfully lobbied the Connecticut General Assembly to pass legislation abolishing tolls on all of Connecticut's highways (with the exception of two car ferries across the Connecticut River in Haddam and Glastonbury). While the 1983 Stratford accident was cited as the main reason for abolishing tolls in Connecticut, the underlying reason was the fact that federal legislation at that time forbade states with toll roads from using federal funds for road projects. Because the Mianus River Bridge was rebuilt with federal highway funds following its June 1983 collapse, Connecticut was required by federal law to remove tolls from the Turnpike once its construction bonds were paid off.[citation needed] The Mianus River Bridge on Interstate 95 in the Cos Cob section of Greenwich, Connecticut is famous for the collapse of a 100-foot deck of its eastbound span on June 28, 1983. ...


The debate over tolls on the Turnpike did not end in 1988 with the abolition of tolls in Connecticut. Prior to their removal in 1985, tolls on the Connecticut Turnpike generated over $65 million annually. Since their removal in the late 1980s, Connecticut lawmakers have continuously discussed reinstating tolls, but have balked at bringing tolls back out of fear of having to repay $2.6 billion in federal highway funds that Connecticut received for Turnpike construction projects following the abolition of tolls.


During the economic recession of the early 1990s, legislators studied reinstating tolls on parts of the Connecticut Turnpike and portions of highways around Hartford to make up for huge budget deficits. Proposals for reinstating tolls were scrapped in lieu of implementing an income tax and increasing the state gasoline tax and sales tax, and imposing a new tax on corporate windfall profits. All of these measures proved to be as unpopular as tolls and resulted in a mass exodus of residents and businesses from Connecticut during the 1990s. Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income...


Toll Debate Continues

The debate over tolls in Connecticut resurfaced once again during the 2006 gubernatorial election. Incumbent Governor M. Jodi Rell, a Republican, opposes reinstating tolls on Connecticut's highways and favors other means for financing major highway projects, while her opponent, New Haven Mayor John DeStefano, Jr., a Democrat, indicated he was "neither for or against" tolls. With Governor Rell elected for another term, it appears tolls in Connecticut are off the table for the foreseeable future. [5] Connecticut welcome sign, updated with new governors name as Rell takes office on July 1, 2004 Mary Jodi Rell (born June 16, 1946) is a Republican politician who became the 72nd Governor of the U.S. state of Connecticut on July 1, 2004. ... John DeStefano, Jr. ...


Electronic tolling and adjustable toll rates discussed

Because Connecticut lost a major source of revenue when tolls were removed in the 1980s, the state has become heavily dependent on federal funding to finance its highway projects. With the cost of construction outpacing the amount of revenue generated by the federal gasoline tax, experts anticipate the Federal Highway Trust Fund--from which most of Connecticut's highway maintenance and expansion money comes--will be depleted by 2010. Additionally, the evolution of electronic toll collection and automated toll collection technologies throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, combined with the skyrocketing cost of upgrading the Connecticut Turnpike, continued to fuel the debate over reinstating tolls on the Turnpike. Additionally, federal legislation known as SAFETEA-LU, enacted in 2005, afforded states greater flexibility in allowing them to operate toll roads and still receive federal funds for transportation projects, and some states have even turned to the private sector to fund maintenance of highways. The Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU), which governs United States federal surface transporation spending through 2010, was signed into law by President George W. Bush in Montgomery, Illinois on August 10, 2005. ...


Studies have also suggested re-tolling the Turnpike as a means of congestion management, where toll fares can be increased during rush hour periods and discounts for carpools and off-peak travel. The objective is to encourage motorists to carpool and use mass transit to reduce congestion on the Turnpike. Some of these strategies are being discussed as possible solutions to funding several billion dollars worth of upgrades to the Turnpike. In February 2007 the Connecticut Department of Transportation announced a $4 million study concerning the reinstatement of tolls on the Turnpike. The study will consider a range of tolling alternatives, including value pricing, HOT lanes, and possibly leasing the Turnpike similar to the Indiana Toll Road arrangement. This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Indiana Toll Road Length: 156. ...


Exit List

Connecticut Turnpike Exit List

Exits 2 to 76 of the Turnpike are part of I-95 and exits 77 to 90 are part of I-395. ...

Service plazas and rest areas

The turnpike has 13 service plazas. All are open 24 hours and have fuel service. Most have fast food service (sit-down dining, originally featured in some plazas, has been replaced in those facilities by food-court set-ups). Some have small gift shops. The 3 easternmost plazas do not have food service, only gas stations and convenience stores. All plazas have pay phones and restrooms.

  • Darien westbound - MP 9 between Exits 10 and 9 - Food and Fuel
  • Darien eastbound - MP 12 between Exits 12 and 13 - Food and Fuel - Connecticut Welcome Center. The McDonald's restaurant at this service area claims to be the busiest in the country.
  • Fairfield eastbound and westbound - MP 25 between Exits 21 ans 22 - Food and Fuel
  • Milford eastbound and westbound - MP 41 between Exits 40 and 41 - Food and Fuel
  • Branford eastbound and westbound - MP 52 between Exits 53 and 54 - Food and Fuel
  • Madison eastbound and westbound - MP 65 between Exits 61 and 62 - Food and Fuel
  • Montville westbound only - MP 96 between Exits 79A and 79 - Fuel and Convenience Store
  • Plainfield eastbound and westbound - MP 123 between exits 89 and 90 - Fuel and Convenience Store

The former eastbound Montville service area has been turned into a State Police barracks. Located in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Incorporated 1820 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Evonne M. Klein Area  - City 60. ... Located in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Incorporated 1820 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Evonne M. Klein Area  - City 60. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Fairfield is a town located in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Nickname: A Small City with a Big Heart Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Central Region Named 1640 Incorporated (city) 1959 Government type Mayor-council  - Mayor James L. Richetelli, Jr. ... Academy in Branford. ... Madison is a town in the southeastern corner of New Haven County, Connecticut, and it occupies a central location on the Connecticut Shoreline area. ... Montville is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ... Plainfield is a town located in Windham County, Connecticut. ...


In addition to the Service Areas listed above, there is also a Rest Area, with restrooms, phone, picnic area, and seasonal tourist info located eastbound at MP 74 between exits 65 and 66.


There are three State Police stations located on the turnpike: Troop F - Westbrook at MP 74 on westbound side of turnpike. Troop E - Montville at MP 96 on eastbound side of turnpike (at former service plaza). Troop G - Bridgeport at MP 29 and the junction with Routes 8 and 25.


There is one Weigh Station located eastbound at MP 2 in Greenwich. Weigh stations on both sides of the Turnpike used to exist near Exit 18 in Westport; these were removed during the 1990s. The former southbound weigh station in Westport is now used by CONNDOT to store construction materials, while the northcound station was demolished; the grounds returned to their natural state.


The administration building for the former West Haven toll plaza can still be seen driving between Exits 42 and 43. Today, CONNDOT uses the old toll building as a maintenance facility.


References

  1. ^ Connecticut Department of Transportation Highway Log
  2. ^ Connecticut Department of Transportation Traffic Log
  3. ^ Section 13a-21 of the General Statutes of Connecticut
  4. ^ Connecticut Department of Transportation History
  5. ^ Will Connecticut's Drivers Have to Endure Tolls Again? Associated Content October 27, 2006

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Connecticut Turnpike (5467 words)
The Mianus River Bridge on Interstate 95 in the Cos Cob section of Greenwich, Connecticut is famous for the collapse of a 100-foot deck of its eastbound span on June 28, 1983.
Connecticut is bordered on the south by Long Island Sound, on the west by New York State, on the north by Massachusetts, and on the east by Rhode Island.
The Interstate highways in the state are I-95 (the Connecticut Turnpike) running southwest to northeast along the coast, I-84 running southwest to northeast in the center of the state, I-91 running north to south in the center of the state, and I-395 running north to south near the eastern border of the state.
Interstate 395 (Connecticut) (1228 words)
The CT 52 Expressway, which was constructed by the Connecticut Highway Department, was to provide connections to the Massachusetts Turnpike (I-90), I-290, I-190 and I-495 in the Bay State.
In addition to forming part of a "Boston bypass" route from coastal Connecticut to northern New England, the $62 million CT 52 Expressway was expected to boost the economy of eastern Connecticut.
Design standards on the four-lane CT 52 Expressway were similar to those on the original Connecticut Turnpike section to the south, except that a narrow, steel-guardrail barrier had been replaced with a wide, variable median.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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