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Encyclopedia > Connecticut Colony
A map of the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies.
A map of the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies.
A map showing Connecticut's western land claims.
A map showing Connecticut's western land claims.

The Connecticut Colony was an English colony that became the U.S. state of Connecticut. Originally known as the River Colony, the colony was organized on March 3, 1636 as a haven for Puritan noblemen. After early struggles with the Dutch, the English gained control of the colony permanently by the late 1630s. The colony was later the scene of a bloody war between the English and Native Americans, known as the Pequot War. It played a significant role in the establishment of self-government in the New World with its legendary refusal to surrender local authority to the Dominion of New England, an event known as the Charter Oak incident. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x680, 189 KB) [edit] Summary This is a map showing the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies from 1636-1776. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x680, 189 KB) [edit] Summary This is a map showing the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies from 1636-1776. ... Image File history File links Ctwestclaims. ... Image File history File links Ctwestclaims. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The Pequot War was an armed conflict in 1637 between an alliance of Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies, with American Indian allies (the Narragansett, and Mohegan Indians), against the Pequot Indians. ... The Dominion of New England was the name of a short-lived administrative union of English colonies in the New England region of North America. ... The Charter Oak on the Connecticut quarter The Charter Oak was an unusually large white oak tree growing, from around the 12th or 13th century until 1856, on what the English colonists named Wyllys Hill, in Hartford, Connecticut, USA. // Early history The Dutch explorer Adrian (or Adriaen) Block described, in...


Two other English colonies in the present area of the State of Connecticut merged into the Connecticut Colony: Saybrook Colony in 1644; New Haven Colony in 1662. Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The Saybrook Colony was established in late 1635 at the mouth of the Connecticut River in what is today Old Saybrook, Connecticut and environs. ... The New Haven Colony was an English colonial venture in Connecticut in North America from 1637 to 1662. ...

Contents

History

The first Europeans to the area were the members of the expedition of Dutch explorer Adriaen Block, who sailed through Long Island Sound and up the Connecticut River to present-day Hartford in 1614, encountering the Pequot people who lived in the area. By the 1620s, Dutch traders from New Amsterdam established fur trading posts along the Connecticut River, most notably the "House of Good Hope" (or Huys de Hoop) located where the Park River flows into the Connecticut River on the site of what is now Hartford. The European peoples are the various nations and ethnic groups of Europe. ... Blocks map of his 1614 voyage, with the first appearance of the term New Netherland Adriaen Block (1567–1627) was a Dutch private fur trader and navigator who explored the coastal and river valley areas between present-day New Jersey and Massachusetts during four voyages from 1611 to 1614... New York City waterways: 1. ... The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ... Hartford redirects here. ... See Main articles: Mashantucket Pequot Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation. ... This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ... The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ... Fort Hoop (Dutch: Fort Goede Hoop; Algic: Suckiaug) was a settlement by the New Netherlands colony in the land that would eventually become Connecticut. ... Park River refers to several different things. ...

Site of Fort Saybrooke near the mouth of the Connecticut River

By 1630, the English, the Dutch's main rival in North America, had established several settlements on the eastern coast of New England, including Plymouth Colony in 1620, New Hampshire Colony in 1623, and Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630. King James I of England granted the Earl of Warwick, president of the Council for New England, the right to settle the area west of Narragansett Bay to the Pacific Ocean. In 1631, the Earl of Warwick conveyed the grant to 15 Puritan lords in England as a potential refuge in North America. The patentees included William Fiennes, 1st Viscount Saye and Sele, as well as Lord Brooke, and Colonel George Fenwick. In 1635, the patentees commissioned John Winthrop, Jr., son of the governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, as "Governor of River Colony". Site of Fort Saybrooke (Connecticut Colony) near the mouth of the Connecticut River in Old Saybrook, Connecticut (taken Sept. ... Site of Fort Saybrooke (Connecticut Colony) near the mouth of the Connecticut River in Old Saybrook, Connecticut (taken Sept. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Seal of Plymouth Colony Map of Plymouth Colony showing town locations Capital Plymouth Language(s) English Religion Puritan, Separatist Government Monarchy Legislature General Court History  - Established 1620  - First Thanksgiving 1621  - Pequot War 1637  - King Philips War 1675–1676  - Part of the Dominion of New England 1686–1688  - Disestablished 1691... The New Hampshire Colony was the product of several English land grants dating from 1623 to 1680, and for much of its colonial history was subject to the Massachusetts Colony and its leadership in Boston. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Robert Rich Robert Rich, 2nd Earl of Warwick (1587 - 1658) was an English colonial administrator and admiral. ... The sea to sea grant of Plymouth Council for New England is shown in green. ... Narragansett Bay, shown in pink. ... For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... William Fiennes, 1st Viscount Saye and Sele (May 28, 1582–April 14, 1662), was the only son of Richard Fiennes, 7th Baron Saye and Sele, and was descended from James Fiennes, Lord Saye and Sele, who was lord chamberlain and lord treasurer under Henry VI and was beheaded by the... John Winthrop (February 12, 1606-April 5, 1676), generally known as John Winthrop the Younger, was governor of Connecticut. ...


Winthrop Sadiehawkins arrived in Boston in October 1635 and learned that the Dutch were planning to occupy the mouth of the Connecticut River at a place called Pasbeshauke, meaning "place at the mouth of the river" in the Algonquian language. To counter the Dutch, Winthrop sent a small bark (canoe) to the mouth of the Connecticut with 20 carpenters and other workmen under the leadership of Lieutenant Edward Gibbons and Sergeant Simon Willard. The expedition landed near the mouth of the river, on the west bank in present-day Old Saybrook, on November 24, 1635 and located the Dutch coat of arms nailed on a tree. They tore down the coat of arms and replaced it with a shield painted with a grinning face. They established a battery of cannon and built a small fort. When the Dutch ship returned several days later, they sighted the cannon and the English ships and withdrew. Winthrop renamed the point "Point Sayebrooke" in honor of Fiennes (Viscount Saye) and Lord Brooke. Boston redirects here. ... The Algonquian languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... Carpenter at work in Tennessee, June 1942. ... Old Saybrook is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. ... For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ...


English settlers from other New England colonies moved into the Connecticut Valley in the 1630s. In 1633, William Holmes led a group of settlers from Plymouth Colony to the Connecticut Valley, where they established Windsor, a few miles north of the Dutch trading post. In 1634, John Oldham and a handful of Massachusetts families built temporary houses in the area of Wethersfield, a few miles south of the Dutch outpost. In the next two years, thirty families from Watertown, Massachusetts joined Oldham's followers at Wethersfield. The English population of the area exploded in 1636 when clergyman Thomas Hooker led 100 settlers, including Richard Risley, with 130 head of cattle in a trek from Newtown (now Cambridge) in the Massachusetts Bay Colony to the banks of the Connecticut River, where they established Hartford directly across the Park River from the old Dutch fort. In 1637, the three Connecticut River towns -- Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield -- set up a collective government in order to fight the Pequot War. William Edgar Holmes was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Motto: First in Connecticut, First for its Citizens Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford Region Capitol Region Settled 1633 Named 1637 Government  - Type Council-manager[1]  - Town manager Peter Souza  - Town council Donald S. Trinks, Mayor; Timothy Curtis, Deputy Mayor; Robert B. Gegetskas II... John Oldham (1592-1636) was an early Puritan settler in Massachusetts. ... Wethersfield is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. ... The Town of Watertown is a city[1] in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Hookers Company reach the Connecticut, publishers: Estes & Lauriat, 1879 Thomas Hooker (July 5, 1586 – July 7, 1647) was a prominent Puritan religious and colonial leader remembered as one of the founders of the Colony of Connecticut. ... Richard Risley (before 1615 - 1648) was an early Puritan settler in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and one of the founders of Hartford, Connecticut. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Park River refers to several different things. ...


In the Summer of 1638, the towns drew up their Fundamental Orders, setting out the principles, powers, and structure of the government. These were adopted by the Connecticut council on January 14, 1639. The Connecticut Colony received a royal charter in 1662 and became an official crown colony. The Fundamental Orders were adopted by the Connecticut Colony council on January 14, 1638. ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ...


The New Haven Colony was a separate entity; it was merged into the Connecticut Colony under the 1662 charter. (The citizens of New Haven may have first recognized Connecticut authority on January 5, 1665.) The New Haven Colony combined with the Connecticut Colony largely due to pressure from England, as New Haven had harbored three of the judges who had condemned King Charles I to death in 1649. When the charter was later on to be confiscated a citizen hid it in an Oak tree's trunk. Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ...


The New Haven Colony in 1641 in an agreement with the Lenape tribe was to claim that it owned all the land east and west of the Delaware River. The Colony was to set up the first settlement of any kind in modern Philadelphia. Residents of New Sweden and New Amsterdam who lived in the area burned the community and it was disavowed by the Massachusetts Bay Colony. While New Haven was to retreat from the venture, the Lenape agreement was to form the basis of a Connecticut sea to sea claim of owning all the land east and west of the Delaware from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean. For the language, see Lenape language. ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas) The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... New Sweden, or Nya Sverige, was a small Swedish settlement along the Delaware River on the Mid-Atlantic coast of North America. ... This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on...


Leaders

Thomas Hooker, a prominent Puritan minister, and Gov. John Haynes of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, who led 100 people to Hartford in 1636, are often considered the founders of the Connecticut colony. The sermon he delivered to his congregation on the principles of government on May 31, 1638 influenced those who would write the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut later that year. The Fundamental Orders may have been drafted by Roger Ludlow of Windsor, the only trained lawyer living in Connecticut in the 1630s, and were transcribed into the official record by the secretary, Thomas Welles. Hookers Company reach the Connecticut, publishers: Estes & Lauriat, 1879 Thomas Hooker (July 5, 1586 – July 7, 1647) was a prominent Puritan religious and colonial leader remembered as one of the founders of the Colony of Connecticut. ... The Fundamental Orders were adopted by the Connecticut Colony council on January 14, 1638. ... Roger Ludlow (1590-1664) was one of the founders of the colony (later the state) of Connecticut. ... Thomas Welles (1598-1660) is the only man in Connecticuts history to hold all four top offices: governor, deputy governor, treasurer, and secretary. ...


The Rev. John Davenport and merchant Theophilus Eaton are considered the founders of the New Haven Colony, which would be absorbed into Connecticut Colony in the 1660s. Contemporary portrait of John Davenport John Davenport (April 9, 1597 – March 15, 1670) was a puritan clergyman and co-founder of the American colony of New Haven. ... Theophilus Eaton (1590 – January 7, 1658) was a merchant, farmer, and British colonial leader who was the co-founder and first governor of New Haven Colony, Connecticut. ... The New Haven Colony was an English colonial venture in Connecticut in North America from 1637 to 1662. ...


In the colony's early years, the governor could not serve consecutive terms. Thus, for twenty years, the governship often rotated between John Haynes and Edward Hopkins, both of whom were from Hartford. George Wyllys, Thomas Welles, and John Webster, also Hartford men, sat in the governor's chair for brief periods in the 1640s and 1650s. Gov. ... Cnwb 23:54, 30 August 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... George Wyllis (born 1590-died March 9, 1645) served for a year (1642) as one of the early governors of the Connecticut Colony. ... Thomas Welles (1598-1660) is the only man in Connecticuts history to hold all four top offices: governor, deputy governor, treasurer, and secretary. ...


John Winthrop, Jr. of New London, the son of the founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, played an important role in consolidating separate settlements on the Connecticut River into a single colony; and he served as Governor of Connecticut from 1659 to 1675. Winthrop was also instrumental in obtaining the colony's 1662 charter, which incorporated New Haven into Connecticut. His son, Fitz-John Winthrop, would also govern the colony for ten years, starting in 1698. John Winthrop (February 12, 1606-April 5, 1676), generally known as John Winthrop the Younger, was governor of Connecticut. ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on...


William Leete of Guilford served as governor of New Haven Colony before that colony's merger into Connecticut, and as governor of Connecticut following John Winthrop, Jr's death in 1675. He is the only man to serve as governor of both New Haven and Connecticut. Guilford is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States, that borders Madison, Branford, North Branford and Durham, and is situated on I-95 and the coast. ...


Robert Treat of Milford served as governor of the colony both prior to and after its inclusion in Sir Edmund Andros's Dominion of New England. His father, Richard Treat, was one of the original patentees of the colony. Robert Treat (1622 - 1710) was an American colonial leader and governor of Connecticut between 1683 and 1698. ... Nickname: A Small City with a Big Heart Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Central Region Named 1640 Incorporated (city) 1959 Government type Mayor-council  - Mayor James L. Richetelli, Jr. ... Sir Edmund Andros (December 6, 1637 - February 24, 1714), an early American colonial governor, was the son of Amice Andros, Seigneur of Sausmarez. ... The Dominion of New England was the name of a short-lived administrative union of English colonies in the New England region of North America. ... Richard Treat (or Trott) (1584 - 1669) was an early New England settler who emigrated from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1637. ...


The colony enjoyed a string of strong governors in the 18th century, many being re-elected yearly until they died. Upon the death of Fitz-John Winthrop, Gurdon Saltonstall, Winthrop's minister in New London, was elected governor. Saltonstall was the only minister to serve as governor of Connecticut, and he belies the common misconception that Puritan clergy could not hold political office. Upon Saltonstall's death, Deputy Governor Joseph Talcott of Hartford became governor. Deputy Governor Jonathan Law of Milford succeeded to the position of governor upon Talcott's death. When Jonathan Law died, Deputy Governor Roger Wolcott of Windsor became governor. Wolcott, the father of Declaration of Independence signer Oliver Wolcott, was voted out of office in 1754 for his role in the Spanish Ship Case. Wolcott's successor, Thomas Fitch of Norwalk, guided the colony through the Seven Years' War, but was, himself, voted out of office in 1766 for not being strong enough in his reputidation of the Stamp Act. William Pitkin of Hartford (now East Hartford), the man who defeated Fitch, was a leader in the Sons of Liberty and also the cousin of former governor Roger Wolcott. Pitkin died in office in 1769, and was replaced by Deputy Governor Jonathan Trumbull, a merchant from Lebanon. Trumbull, also a supporter of the Sons of Liberty, continued to be elected governor throughout the Revolutionary War and retired as governor in 1784, the year after the signing of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, which granted the United States its independence from Great Britain. Roger Wolcott (1679 - 1767) was an American political figure. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... Oliver Wolcott (December 1, 1726–December 1, 1797), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Connecticut. ... Thomas Fitch (c. ... Norwalk is a city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of Great Britain and its American Colonies Electorate of Hanover Iroquois Confederacy Kingdom of Portugal Electorate of Brunswick Electorate of Hesse-Kassel Philippines Archduchy of Austria Kingdom of France Empire of Russia Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and... A stamp act is a law enacted by a government that requires a tax to be paid on the transfer of certain documents. ... East Hartford (41n47, 72w37 EST) is a census-designated place located in Hartford County, Connecticut. ... This article discusses the early American patriot group. ... Gov. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Painting by Benjamin West depicting (from left to right) John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ...


Reasons for founding

Thomas Hooker led settlers to the Connecticut valley to help satisfy New England's increasing demand for farm land. He may have also left because of a squabble he got into with John Cotton. Although the two ministers argued over whether or not one could prepare for salvation, the argument may have actually been personal in nature. Hooker had been a prominent minister back in England, but, in Cambridge, he found his prominence was being overshadowed by Cotton. By withdrawing from the Bay Colony and moving west to the Connecticut River, Hooker was diffusing the conflict. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... John Cotton (1585–1652) The Reverend John Cotton (December 4, 1585 – December 23, 1652) was a highly regarded principal among the New England Puritan ministers, who also included John Winthrop, Thomas Hooker, Increase Mather (who became his son-in-law), John Davenport, and Thomas Shepard. ...


Role of religion

Like Massachusetts Bay Colony, Connecticut was founded by Puritans who made the Congregational Church the established church in the colony. Tax dollars supported the local ministers, and colonists who failed to attend Sunday services were subject to fines. Until 1708, the Congregational Church was the only legal religion in Connecticut. That year, however, the colony recognized "sober dissent," and excused certain dissenters, notably Anglicans and Baptists, from paying taxes to support the state church, provided, of course, that they contributed to their own lawful dissenting church. Also in 1708, the colony adopted the Saybrook Platform, which took church sovereignty away from the local congregations and placed it in the hands of a colony-wide consociation controlled by ministers. Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Saybrook Platform refers to conservative religious proposals adopted at Saybrook, Connecticut, in September, 1708, which attempted to stem the tide of disunity among the established Congregational churches and restore discipline among both the clergy and their congregations. ...


In 1701, the General Assembly authorized the formation of the Collegiate School, with the mission of training new Congregational ministers in the colony. After locating in Killingworth, Saybrook, and Wethersfield, the school found a permanent home in New Haven in 1716. In 1718, following a substantial gift from Elihu Yale, a wealthy English businessman who had been born in Boston, the institution's name was changed to Yale College. In the early 1720s, religious controversy gripped Yale, as the school's rector, Rev. Timothy Cutler, along with one of the tutors and two neighboring ministers were accused of converting to Anglicanism. Determined to enforce orthodoxy at the instution, in 1722 the school's trustees dismissed Rev. Cutler and the offending tutor, and adopted a resolution requiring that, in the future, all rectors and tutors must declare their assent to the Saybrook Platform. For other uses, see Killingworth (disambiguation). ... Old Saybrook is a town located in Middlesex County, Connecticut. ... Wethersfield is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... Elihu Yale Elihu Yale, (April 5, 1649 – July 8, 1721), was the first benefactor of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Yale redirects here. ... Timothy Cutler (1684 - 1765) was an American Congregational clergyman and educator. ...


The Great Awakening sent shock waves through the colony in the middle of the eighteenth century, ripping the Congregational Church apart. Those who embraced the Awakening were known as New Lights, while those opposed to it became known as Old Lights. Unhappy with the often unemotional services of their regular ministers, New Lights in many towns petitioned to form separate religious societies or churches. Often Old Lights would oppose these attempts, arguing that the New Lights were neither sober (because of the emotional nature of their services) nor dissenting (because they continued to be Congregationalists). In 1741, Old Lights who tried to suppress the Awakening succeeded in convincing the General Assembly to pass an Itineracy Law, which prohibited traveling ministers from preaching in a Connecticut town without an invitation from the town's minister. Many historians believe that this law was the spark that led to the creation of issue politics in the colony. The Great Awakenings refer to several periods of dramatic religious revival in Anglo-American religious history. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


During the American Revolution many of the colony's Anglicans, most of which were concentrated in Fairfield County, remained Loyalists. One Anglican, Moses Dunbar of Bristol, was convicted of treason and hanged for being a Loyalist. John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Fairfield County is located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Britannia gives a heros welcome to returning American Loyalists. ... Nickname: Mum City Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Region Central Connecticut Incorporated (town) 1785 Incorporated (city) 1911 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor William T. Stortz Area  - City 69. ... For other uses, see Treason (disambiguation) or Traitor (disambiguation). ...


Congregationalism remained the established church in Connecticut throughout the Revolutionary Period, although, with time, more dominations were exempted as "sober dissenting" churches. With the adoption of Connecticut's 1818 state constitution, the Congregational Church was disestablished and separation of church and state finally came to Connecticut.


See also

The History of Connecticut begins as a number of unrelated colonial villages. ... The Pequot War was an armed conflict in 1637 between an alliance of Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies, with American Indian allies (the Narragansett, and Mohegan Indians), against the Pequot Indians. ... Attack King Philips War, sometimes called Metacoms War or Metacoms Rebellion,[1] was an armed conflict between Indian inhabitants of present-day southern New England and English colonists and their Indian allies from 1675 – 1676. ... The following is a list of governors of the Connecticut Colony, from 1639 to 1776. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Connecticut - LoveToKnow 1911 (5914 words)
In 1727 the Church of England was permitted to organize in the colony, and in 1729 a similar privilege was granted to the Baptists and Quakers.
Connecticut volunteers were among the first to go to Boston after the battle of Lexington and more than one-half of Washington's army at New York in 1776 was composed of Connecticut soldiers.
Governors Of Connecticut 1 The Colony of Connecticut.
Connecticut, state, United States. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (1812 words)
Connecticut’s population expanded gradually, and by 1662 the colony included over a dozen towns, including Saybrook, New London, Fairfield, and Norwalk, as well as East Hampton and Southampton on Long Island.
In 1643, New Haven and Connecticut colonies joined with Massachusetts Bay colony and Plymouth colony to form the New England Confederation, a loose union for mutual defense.
Connecticut was one of the first states to approve the U.S. Constitution (see Constitutional Convention).
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