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Encyclopedia > Connecticut
State of Connecticut
Flag of Connecticut
Flag of Connecticut Seal of Connecticut
Nickname(s): The Constitution State, The Nutmeg State[1]
Motto(s): Qui transtulit sustinet[1]
Latin meaning "He who transplanted still sustains"
Official language(s) none (de facto English)
Demonym Connecticuter or Connecticutian[2]
Capital Hartford
Largest city Bridgeport[3]
Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[4]
Area  Ranked 48th in the US
 - Total 5,543[5] sq mi
(14,356 km²)
 - Width 70 miles (113 km)
 - Length 110 miles (177 km)
 - % water 12.6
 - Latitude 40°58′ N to 42°03′ N
 - Longitude 71°47′ W to 73°44′ W
Population  Ranked 29th in the US
 - Total 3,405,565[5]
 - Density 702.9/sq mi 
271.40/km² (4th in the US)
 - Median income  $55,970 (4th)
Elevation  
 - Highest point South slope of Mount Frissell[6]
Note: The peak of Mount Frissell
is in Massachusetts
2,380 ft  ({{{HighestElev}}} m)
 - Mean 500 ft  (152 m)
 - Lowest point Long Island Sound[6]
0 ft  (0 m)
Admission to Union  January 9, 1788 (5th)
Governor M. Jodi Rell (R)
Lieutenant Governor Michael Fedele (R)
U.S. Senators Christopher Dodd (D)
Joe Lieberman (ID)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Abbreviations CT. Conn. US-CT
Website www.ct.gov

Connecticut (IPA: /kəˈnɛtɪkət/)[7] is an state located in the New England region of the northeastern United States of America. Portions of southwestern Connecticut are also considered part of the New York metropolitan area. Connecticut is the 29th most populous state with 3.4 million residents and ranked 48th in size by area, making it the 4th most densely populated state.[5] Called the "Constitution State," Connecticut has a long history dating from the early colonial times, and was influential in the development of early American government. Image File history File links Flag_of_Connecticut. ... This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... The flag of Connecticut consists of a white shield with three grapevines (each bearing three bunches of purple grapes) on an field of azure blue. ... A first version of the seal A second version A modern version Seal of Connecticut (also Connecticut State Seal, in full: Great Seal of the State of Connecticut) is a coat of arms of Connecticut. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Great Seal of Connecticut with the state motto Qui Transtulit Sustinet Qui transtulit sustinet (Latin He who transplanted sustains, also He Who Transplanted Still Sustains or He Who Transplanted Continues to Sustain) is a state motto of Connecticut depicted on a blue ribbon below the grapevines. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_CT.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Connecticut ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Hartford redirects here. ... Bridgeport redirects here. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Hartford redirects here. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Mount Frissells South Slope (2380 feet) is the highest point in Connecticut. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Connecticut welcome sign, updated with new governors name as Rell takes office on July 1, 2004 Mary Jodi Rell (born June 16, 1946) is a Republican politician who became the 72nd Governor of the U.S. state of Connecticut on July 1, 2004. ... GOP redirects here. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Michael Fedele, a Republican, is Connecticuts 107th Lieutenant Governor. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... For the Iraqi electoral formation led by Adnan Pachachi, see Assembly of Independent Democrats. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Connecticut to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... “Eastern Daylight Time” redirects here. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... ISO 3166-2 codes for the United States of America cover 50 states, 1 district, 6 outlying areas (including 9 minor outlying islands under separate ISO 3166-1 country code UM). ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Map of the US northeast. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island is the most populous metropolitan area in the United States and is also one of the most populous in the world . ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ...


While Connecticut's first European settlers were Dutch, the first major settlements were established in the 1630s by the English. Thomas Hooker led a band of followers overland from the Massachusetts Bay colony and founded what would become the Connecticut Colony; other settlers from Massachusetts founded the Saybrook Colony and the New Haven Colony. Both the Connecticut and New Haven Colonies established documents of Fundamental Orders, considered the first constitutions in North America. In 1662, the disparate colonies merged under a royal charter, making Connecticut a crown colony. This colony was one of the Thirteen Colonies that revolted against British rule in the American Revolution. The Dutch (Ethnonym: Nederlanders meaning Lowlanders) are the dominant ethnic group[1] of the Netherlands[2]. They are usually seen as a Germanic people. ... Great Migration (Puritan) Thirty Years War in full swing in Europe 1632 - Just a couple of months before his death in battle, Swedish king Gustav II Adolf The Great ratifies the establishment of University of Tartu, the second university in the Swedish Empire September 8, 1636 - A vote of the... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Hookers Company reach the Connecticut, publishers: Estes & Lauriat, 1879 Thomas Hooker (July 5, 1586 – July 7, 1647) was a prominent Puritan religious and colonial leader remembered as one of the founders of the Colony of Connecticut. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... A map of the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies. ... The Saybrook Colony was established in late 1635 at the mouth of the Connecticut River in what is today Old Saybrook, Connecticut and environs. ... The New Haven Colony was an English colonial venture in Connecticut in North America from 1637 to 1662. ... The Fundamental Orders were adopted by the Connecticut Colony council on January 14, 1638. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen...


Connecticut enjoys a temperate climate thanks to its long coastline on the Long Island Sound. This has given the state a strong maritime tradition. Modern Connecticut is also known for its wealth. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Connecticut had ready access to raw materials which helped to develop a strong manufacturing industry. In the 19th and 20th centuries, financial organizations flourished: first insurance companies in Hartford, then hedge funds along the Gold Coast. This prosperity has helped give Connecticut the highest per capita income and median household income in the country.[8][9] For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... New York City waterways: 1. ... The history of Connecticut Industry is a major part of the history of Connecticut. ... The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company is one of the largest New York based life insurance companies Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... The term hedge fund dates back to the first such fund founded by Alfred Winslow Jones in 1949. ... The Gold Coast is a region of the state of Connecticut roughly contiguous with the boundaries of Fairfield County; it derives its regional nickname from Fairfield County being ranked as one of the wealthiest counties in the United States and being the headquarters to most of the hedge funds in... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ...

Contents

Geography

Further information: Geology of Connecticut

Connecticut is bordered on the south by Long Island Sound, on the west by New York State, on the north by Massachusetts, and on the east by Rhode Island. The state capital is Hartford, and the other major cities include New Haven, New London, New Britain, Norwich, Milford, Norwalk, Stamford, Waterbury, Danbury and Bridgeport. There are 169 incorporated towns in Connecticut. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 395 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 1,390 pixels, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 395 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 1,390 pixels, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... New Haven redirects here. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x708, 164 KB) Original photo by OWL taken on 2004-07-22 at 11:04 A.M. I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x708, 164 KB) Original photo by OWL taken on 2004-07-22 at 11:04 A.M. I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 3. ... Hartford redirects here. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2502x650, 407 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2502x650, 407 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... As part of New England, Connecticut has undergone much geologic change shaped by plate tectonics, volcanism, and glacial activity. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Hartford redirects here. ... New Haven redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1850 Incorporated (city) 1870 Consolidated 1905 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Timothy T. Stewart Area  - Total 34. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Named 1640 Incorporated (city) 1959 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor James L. Richetelli, Jr. ... Norwalk is a city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... Nickname: Motto: Quid Aere Perennius (What Is More Lasting Than Brass) Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , Country U.S. State NECTA Waterbury Region Central Naugatuck Valley Incorporated (town) 1686 Incorporated (city) 1853 Consolidated 1902 Government  - Type Mayor-board of aldermen  - Mayor Michael J. Jarjura Area  - City  28. ... Nickname: Located in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1702 Incorporated (city) 1889 Consolidated 1965 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Mark D. Boughton (R) Area  - City 114. ... Bridgeport redirects here. ... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ...

Bear Mountain, highest peak in Connecticut
Bear Mountain, highest peak in Connecticut

The highest peak in Connecticut is Bear Mountain in Salisbury in the northwest corner of the state. The highest point is just east of where Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New York meet (42° 3' N; 73° 29' W), on the southern slope of Mount Frissell, whose peak lies nearby in Massachusetts.[10] Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 823 KB)Taken with digital camera in June, 2005. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 823 KB)Taken with digital camera in June, 2005. ... Bear Mountain is the tallest mountain with its peak in Connecticut, USA, at 2,316 feet (706 m). ... Salisbury is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the state. ... Mount Frissells South Slope (2380 feet) is the highest point in Connecticut. ...


The Connecticut River cuts through the center of the state, flowing into Long Island Sound, Connecticut's outlet to the Atlantic Ocean. The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ...

Further information: List of Connecticut rivers
Highest point in Connecticut on slope of Mount Frissell, as seen from Bear Mountain
Highest point in Connecticut on slope of Mount Frissell, as seen from Bear Mountain

Despite its size, the state has regional variations in its landscape and culture from the wealthy estates of Fairfield County's "Gold Coast" to the rolling mountains and horse-farms of the Litchfield Hills of northwestern Connecticut. Connecticut's rural areas and small towns in the northeast and northwest corners of the state contrast sharply with its industrial cities, located along the coastal highways from the New York border to New Haven, then northwards to Hartford, as well as further up the coast near New London. Many towns center around a "green," (such as the New Haven Green), Litchfield Green, Simsbury Green, New Milford Green (the largest in the state), and Wethersfield Green (the oldest in the state). Near the green typically stand historical visual symbols of New England towns, such as a small white church, a colonial meeting house, a colonial tavern or "inne", several colonial houses, etc., establishing a scenic historicity maintained for both historic preservation and the tourism trade. List of Connecticut rivers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 816 KB)Taken with digital camera in June, 2005. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 816 KB)Taken with digital camera in June, 2005. ... The Gold Coast is a region of the state of Connecticut roughly contiguous with the boundaries of Fairfield County; it derives its regional nickname from Fairfield County being ranked as one of the wealthiest counties in the United States and being the headquarters to most of the hedge funds in... The Litchfield Hills is a region of the state of Connecticut located in the northwestern corner of the state; it is a term that is semi-contiguous with the boundaries of Litchfield County, for which it is named. ... The village green in Comberton in Cambridgeshire, UK, with a pond, a village sign and a bench to enjoy the view For the community in New York, see Village Green, New York. ... The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Colonial house and street A colonial house, also called Georgian, is a style of house that was popular in America from 1690 to 1830. ... Historicity refers to the historical authenticity of a person, event, or place. ... Demolition of the former Penn Station concourse raised public awareness about preservation Historic preservation is the act of maintaining and repairing existing historic materials and the retention of a propertys form as it has evolved over time. ... Tourist redirects here. ...


Due to the climate, degree of urbanization, and economic status of the state, it offers easily accessed forests, rivers, lakes, waterfalls and a coastline, all developed for recreation. This article is about a community of trees. ... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Waterfall (disambiguation). ... A coastal image featured on a United States postal stamp. ...

Further information: List of Connecticut state forests

The northern boundary of the state with Massachusetts is marked by the distinctive Southwick Jog or Granby Notch, an approximately 2.5 mile (4.0 km) square detour into Connecticut slightly west of the center of the border. The actual origin of this anomaly is uncertain, with stories ranging from the original surveyors having been drunk, having attempted to avoid hostile Native Americans, or having taken a shortcut up the Connecticut River; Massachusetts residents having attempted to avoid Massachusetts' higher taxes for the lower taxes of Connecticut; Massachusetts' interest in the resources represented by the Congamond Lakes which lie on the border of the jog; and the need to compensate Massachusetts for an amount of land given to Connecticut due to inaccurate survey work.[11][12] Connecticut state forests This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ...

Windsor's Town Hall and Fountain on the Town Green
Windsor's Town Hall and Fountain on the Town Green

The southwestern border of Connecticut, where it abuts New York State, is marked by a panhandle in Fairfield County, containing the towns of Greenwich, Stamford, New Canaan and Darien. This irregularity in the boundary is the result of territorial disputes in the late 1600s, culminating with New York giving up its claim to the area, whose residents considered themselves part of Connecticut, in exchange for an equivalent area extending northwards from Ridgefield, Connecticut to the Massachusetts border as well as undisputed claim to Rye, New York.[13] Image File history File links WindsorCTtownhallfountain. ... Image File history File links WindsorCTtownhallfountain. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fairfield County is located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1640 Joined Connecticut 1656 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Peter Tesei  - Town administrator Edward Gomeau  - Town meeting moderator Thomas J. Byrne Area  - Total 174. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... New Canaan is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States, 8 miles (13 km) northeast of Stamford, on the Five Mile River. ... Darien is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... The History of Connecticut begins as a number of unrelated colonial villages. ... Ridgefield is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Rye, New York is the name of two places in Westchester County, New York. ...

Further information: Connecticut Panhandle

Areas maintained by the National Park Service include: Appalachian National Scenic Trail; Quinebaug & Shetucket Rivers Valley National Heritage Corridor; and Weir Farm National Historic Site. The Connecticut Panhandle is in southwestern Connecticut, where it abuts New York State. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail, is a 2,174 mile (3500 km) marked hiking trail in the eastern United States, running from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mt. ... Weir Farm National Historic Site is located in Wilton, Connecticut. ...


Climate

Connecticut has a Humid Continental Climate, with seasonal extremes tempered by its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean. Winters are cold, with average temperatures ranging from 31 °F (-1 °C) in the southeast to 23 °F (-5 °C) in the northwest in January. The average yearly snowfall is about 25–100" (64–254 cm) across the state, with higher totals in the northwest. Spring has variable temperatures with frequent rainfall. Summer is hot and humid throughout the state, with average highs in New London of 81 °F (27 °C) and 87 °F (31 °C) in Windsor Locks. Fall months are mild, and bring foliage across the state in October and November. During hurricane season, tropical cyclones occasionally affect the region. Thunderstorms are most frequent during the summer, occurring on average 30 times annually. These storms can be severe, though tornadoes are rare.[14] The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures For Various Connecticut Cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Bridgeport 37/23 39/25 47/32 57/41 67/51 76/60 82/66 81/65 74/58 63/46 53/38 42/28
Hartford 34/17 38/20 48/28 60/38 72/48 80/57 85/62 82/61 74/52 63/41 51/33 39/23
[1]

History

Main article: History of Connecticut
A map of the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies.
A map of the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies.

The Connecticut region was inhabited by the Mohegan tribe prior to European colonization. The first European explorer in Connecticut was the Dutch explorer Adriaen Block. After he explored this region in 1614, Dutch fur traders sailed up the Connecticut River (then known by the Dutch as Versche Rivier - " Fresh River") and built a fort at Dutch Point near present-day Hartford, which they called "House of Hope" (Dutch: Huis van Hoop). The History of Connecticut begins as a number of unrelated colonial villages. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x680, 189 KB) [edit] Summary This is a map showing the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies from 1636-1776. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x680, 189 KB) [edit] Summary This is a map showing the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies from 1636-1776. ... The Mohegan tribe is an Algonquian-speaking tribe living in eastern (upper Thames valley) Connecticut [1] that was jointly ruled by the Pequot tribe until 1637. ... Blocks map of his 1614 voyage, with the first appearance of the term New Netherland Adriaen Block (1567–1627) was a Dutch private fur trader and navigator who explored the coastal and river valley areas between present-day New Jersey and Massachusetts during four voyages from 1611 to 1614...


John Winthrop, then of Massachusetts, received permission to create a new colony at Old Saybrook at the mouth of the Connecticut River in 1635. This was the first of three distinct colonies that later would be combined to make up Connecticut. Saybrook Colony was a direct challenge to Dutch claims. The colony was not more than a small outpost and never matured. In 1644, the Saybrook Colony merged itself into the Connecticut Colony. Gov. ... The Saybrook Colony was established in late 1635 at the mouth of the Connecticut River in what is today Old Saybrook, Connecticut and environs. ...


The first English settlers came in 1633 and settled at Windsor and then Wethersfield in 1634. However, the main body of settlers came in one large group in 1636. The settlers were Puritans from Massachusetts, led by Thomas Hooker. Hooker had been prominent in England, and was a professor of theology at Cambridge. He was also an important political writer, and made a significant contribution to Constitutional theory. He broke with the political leadership in Massachusetts, and, just as Roger Williams created a new polity in Rhode Island, Hooker and his cohort did the same and established the Connecticut Colony at Hartford in 1636. This was the second of the three colonies. For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... Hookers Company reach the Connecticut, publishers: Estes & Lauriat, 1879 Thomas Hooker (July 5, 1586 – July 7, 1647) was a prominent Puritan religious and colonial leader remembered as one of the founders of the Colony of Connecticut. ... For other persons named Roger Williams, see Roger Williams (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A map of the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies. ...


In the 1637-38 bloody Pequot War the European settlers and allies officially destroyed the Pequot Indians. Lion Gardiner in the Pequot War from a Charles Stanley Reinhart drawing circa 1890 The Pequot War was an armed conflict in 1636-1638 between an alliance of Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies, with Native American allies (the Narragansett, and Mohegan tribe), against the Pequot tribe. ... See Main articles: Mashantucket Pequot Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation. ...


The third colony was founded in March of 1638. New Haven Colony, (originally known as the Quinnipiack Colony), was established by John Davenport, Theophilus Eaton and others at New Haven. The New Haven Colony had its own Constitution, 'The Fundamental Agreement of the New Haven Colony' which was signed on 4 June 1639. The New Haven Colony was an English colonial venture in Connecticut in North America from 1637 to 1662. ... Contemporary portrait of John Davenport John Davenport (April 9, 1597 – March 15, 1670) was a puritan clergyman and co-founder of the American colony of New Haven. ... Theophilus Eaton (1590 – January 7, 1658) was a merchant, farmer, and British colonial leader who was the co-founder and first governor of New Haven Colony, Connecticut. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ...


Because the Dutch were outnumbered by the flood of English settlers from Massachusetts, they left their fort in 1654.


Neither the establishment of the Connecticut Colony or the Quinnipiack Colony were done with the sanction of British imperial authorities, and were independent political entities. They naturally were presumptively English, but in a legal sense, they were only secessionist outposts of Massachusetts Bay. In 1662, Winthrop took advantage of this void in political affairs, and obtained in England the charter by which the colonies of Connecticut and Quinnipiack were united. Although Winthrop's charter favored the Connecticut colony, New Haven remained a seat of government with Hartford, until after the American Revolution.


Winthrop was very politically astute, and secured the charter from the newly restored Charles II; who granted the most liberal political terms. Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ...


Historically important colonial settlements included:

Windsor (1633),
Wethersfield (1634),
Saybrook (1635),
Hartford (1636),
New Haven (1638),
Fairfield (1639),
Stratford (1639),
Stamford (1640),
New London (1646),
Middletown (1647)

Its first constitution, the "Fundamental Orders," was adopted on January 14, 1639, while its current constitution, the third for Connecticut, was adopted in 1965. Connecticut is the fifth of the original thirteen states. The original constitutions influenced the US Constitution as one of the leading authors was Roger Sherman of New Haven. Motto: First in Connecticut, First for its Citizens Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford Region Capitol Region Settled 1633 Named 1637 Government  - Type Council-manager[1]  - Town manager Peter Souza  - Town council Donald S. Trinks, Mayor; Timothy Curtis, Deputy Mayor; Robert B. Gegetskas II... Wethersfield is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. ... Old Saybrook is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. ... Hartford redirects here. ... New Haven redirects here. ... Fairfield is a town located in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ... Nickname: Forest City Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Region Midstate Region Incorporated (town) 1651 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1923 Government type Mayor-council Mayor Sebastian N. Giuliano Area    - City 42. ... The Fundamental Orders were adopted by the Connecticut Colony council on January 14, 1638. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... The Connecticut Constitution is the basic governing document of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Shermans marble statue in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol. ...


The western boundaries of Connecticut have been subject to change over time. According to The Hartford Treaty with the Dutch, signed on 1650-09-19, but never ratified by the British, the western boundary of Connecticut ran north from Greenwich Bay for a distance of 20 Miles[15][16] "provided the said line come not within 10 miles (16 km) [16 km] of Hudson River. This agreement was observed by both sides until war erupted between England and The Netherlands in 1652. No other limits were specified. Conflict over uncertain colonial limits continued until the Duke of York captured New Netherland in 1664.[15][16] "... On the other hand, Connecticut's original Charter in 1662 granted it all the land to the "South Sea," i.e. the Pacific Ocean.[17][18] Most colonial royal grants were for long east-west strips. Connecticut took its grant seriously, and established a ninth county between the Susquehanna and Delaware Rivers, named Westmoreland County. This resulted in the brief Pennamite Wars with Pennsylvania. Year 1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1640 Joined Connecticut 1656 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Peter Tesei  - Town administrator Edward Gomeau  - Town meeting moderator Thomas J. Byrne Area  - Total 174. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... HRH The Prince Andrew, the current Duke of York For the nursery rhyme see The Grand Old Duke of York. ... States which were part of New Netherlands Map based on Adriaen Blocks 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. ... The Susquehanna River (originally Sasquesahanough per the 1612 John Smith map) is a river located in the northeastern United States. ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas). ... Westmoreland County was a county in Connecticut in the present day area of Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania, until it was ceded to Pennsylvania in 1784. ... The Pennamite Wars, fought between 1769 and 1799, were a series of military clashes for control of the Wyoming Valley in northeastern Pennsylvania. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Connecticut's lands also extended across northern Ohio, called the Western Reserve lands. The Western Reserve section was settled largely by people from Connecticut, and they brought Connecticut place names to Ohio. Agreements with Pennsylvania and New York extinguished the land claims by Connecticut within its neighbors, and the Western Reserve lands were relinquished to the federal government, which brought the state to its present boundaries. The Connecticut Western Reserve was land claimed by Connecticut in the Northwest Territory in what is now northeastern Ohio. ...


Names and symbols

Connecticut State Symbols
Living Symbols
 -Bird American Robin
 -Fish American shad
 -Flower Mountain Laurel
 -Insect European Mantis
 -Mammal Sperm whale
 -Tree Charter White oak
Dance Square dance
Fossil Dinosaur tracks
Mineral Garnet
Shell Eastern Oyster
Ship(s) USS Nautilus (SSN-571), Freedom Schooner Amistad
Slogan(s) Full of Surprises
Song(s) Yankee Doodle,
The Nutmeg
Tartan Connecticut State Tartan
Route Marker(s)
Connecticut Route Marker
Quarter
Connecticut quarter
1999
See Also

The name "Connecticut" originates from the Mohegan word quinnitukqut, meaning "place of long tidal river."[19] In fact, the exact spelling "connect I cut", was rendered by Whalley, Goffe, and Dixwell, the three "Regicide Judges" who came to New Haven in the 17th century, fleeing persecution by Charles II of England. [20] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1766 The American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name Alosa sapidissima (Wilson, 1811) The American shad or Atlantic Shad (Alosa sapidissima) is a species of anadromous fish in family Clupeidae of order Clupeiformes. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... Binomial name L. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Kalmia latifolia For the Texas Mountain laurel, see Sophora secundiflora Kalmia latifolia (Mountain-laurel, Spoonwood) is a flowering plant in the family Ericaceae, native to the eastern United States, from southern Maine south to northern Florida, and west to Indiana and... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state butterflies be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The European mantis, also known as the Praying mantis (Mantis religiosa), is one of the most common species of the order Mantodea. ... A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Sperm whale range (in blue) The sperm whale (Physeter catodon) is the largest of all toothed whales, making them the Earths largest living carnivore and largest living toothed animal. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... The Charter Oak on the Connecticut quarter The Charter Oak was an unusually large white oak tree growing, from around the 12th or 13th century until 1856, on what the English colonists named Wyllys Hill, in Hartford, Connecticut, USA. // Early history The Dutch explorer Adrian (or Adriaen) Block described, in... Binomial name Quercus alba L. The White oak (Quercus alba) is one of the most magnificent of oaks. ... This is a list of official U.S. state dances:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Square dance is often used as a general term for modern Western square dance. ... Though every state in the United States has a State Bird and a State Flower, not every state in the United States has a State Fossil. ... A fossilized dinosaur footprint at Clayton Lake State Park, New Mexico. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see Garnet (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official state shells:[1] References ^ List of all state shells http://www. ... Binomial name Gmelin, 1791 The Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, also known as the American oyster, Atlantic oyster, or the Virginia oyster, is a species of oyster that is native to the eastern seaboard of North America. ... This is a list of offical state ships as designated by each states legislature. ... USS Nautilus (SSN-571) was the worlds first operational nuclear-powered submarine and the first vessel to complete a submerged transit across the North Pole. ... La Amistad (Spanish: friendship) was a Spanish merchant ship on which a rebellion by the slaves it was carrying broke out in 1839 when the schooner was traveling along the coast of Cuba. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Yankee Doodle is a well-known US song, often sung patriotically today. ... This is a list of official U.S. state tartans: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Highways in the United States are split into at least four different types of systems. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program (Pub. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (771x768, 973 KB) Source http://www. ... These are lists of U.S. state insignia as designated by tradition or the respective state legislatures List of U.S. state amphibians List of U.S. state beverages List of U.S. state birds List of U.S. state butterflies List of U.S. state colors List of U... The Mohegan tribe is an Algonquian-speaking tribe living in eastern (upper Thames valley) Connecticut [1] that was jointly ruled by the Pequot tribe until 1637. ...


Connecticut's official nickname, adopted in 1959, is "The Constitution State," based on its colonial constitution of 1638–39.[1] Unofficially (but popularly) Connecticut is also known as "The Nutmeg State".[1] The origins of the nutmeg connection to Connecticut is unknown. It may have come from its sailors returning from voyages with nutmeg (which in the 18th and 19th centuries was a very valuable spice). It may have originated in the early machined sheet tin nutmeg grinders sold by early Connecticut peddlars. It is also facetiously said to come from Yankee peddlers from Connecticut who would sell small carved nobs of wood shaped to look like nutmeg to unsuspecting customers.[21] George Washington gave Connecticut the title of "The Provisions State"[1] because of the material aid the state rendered to the Revolutionary War effort. Connecticut is also known as "The Land of Steady Habits".[1] For other uses, see Nutmeg (disambiguation). ... For the Major League Baseball team, see New York Yankees. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ...


According to Webster's New International Dictionary, 1993, a person who is a native or resident of Connecticut is a "Connecticuter". There are numerous other terms coined in print, but not in use, such as: "Connecticotian" - Cotton Mather in 1702. "Connecticutensian" - Samuel Peters in 1781. "Nutmegger" is sometimes used,[22] as is "Yankee" (the official State Song is "Yankee Doodle"), though this usually refers someone from the wider New England region.[23] Linguist Allen Walker Read reports a more playful term, 'connecticutie.' The traditional abbreviation of the state's name is "Conn."; the official postal abbreviation is CT. This article is about the 17th century Puritan minister. ... Reverend Samuel Andrew Peters (1735–1826) was a Connecticut Anglican clergyman and historian. ... Yankee Doodle is a well-known US song, often sung patriotically today. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ...


Commemorative stamps issued by the United States Postal Service with Connecticut themes include Nathan Hale, Eugene O'Neill, Josiah Willard Gibbs, Noah Webster, Eli Whitney, the whaling ship the Charles W. Morgan which is docked in Mystic Seaport, and a decoy of a broadbill duck. This 1998 stamp of the Faroe Islands marks the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... For other persons named Nathan Hale, see Nathan Hale (disambiguation). ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... Josiah Willard Gibbs (February 11, 1839 New Haven – April 28, 1903 New Haven) was one of the very first American theoretical physicists and chemists. ... Noah Webster Noah Webster (October 16, 1758 – April 28, 1843) was an American lexicographer, textbook author, spelling reformer, political writer, word enthusiast, and editor. ... For other uses, see Eli Whitney (disambiguation). ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch. ... For other uses, see Ship (disambiguation). ... One of the s whaling boats, featuring models of crewmembers with oars and harpoons. ... Mystic Seaport is a maritime museum situated along the banks of the Mystic River in Mystic, Connecticut, USA. It is notable both for its collection of sailing ships and boats, and for the re-creation of an entire 19th century seaport, consisting of over 60 original buildings, most of them... For other uses, see Decoy (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies Dendrocygninae Oxyurinae Anatinae Aythyinae Merginae Duck is the common name for a number of species in the Anatidae family of birds. ...

The Charter Oak
The Charter Oak
The USS Nautilus
The USS Nautilus
Connecticut state insignia and historical figures[1], except where noted
State hero Nathan Hale
State heroine Prudence Crandall
State composer Charles Edward Ives
State statues in Statuary Hall Roger Sherman and Jonathan Trumbull[24]
State poet laureate John Hollander
Connecticut State Troubadour Pierce Campbell[25]
State composer laureate Jacob Druckman

Image File history File links Charter_Oak_in_Hartford_CT.jpg‎ Depiction of the Charter Oak in Hartford, CT File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Connecticut Charter Oak Flora of Connecticut ... Image File history File links Charter_Oak_in_Hartford_CT.jpg‎ Depiction of the Charter Oak in Hartford, CT File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Connecticut Charter Oak Flora of Connecticut ... Image File history File links SS-571-Nautilus-trials. ... Image File history File links SS-571-Nautilus-trials. ... For other persons named Nathan Hale, see Nathan Hale (disambiguation). ... Prudence Crandall, a schoolteacher raised as a Quaker, stirred controversy with her education of black girls in Canterbury, Connecticut. ... This photo from around 1913 shows Ives in his day job: he was the director of a successful insurance firm. ... Part of the National Statuary Hall Collection The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ... Shermans marble statue in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol. ... Gov. ... Many US states have posts occupied by prominent poets and entitled Poet Laureate of . ... John Hollander (born October 29, 1929) is an American poet and literary critic. ... Connecticut State Troubadour is an honorary position, established in 1991 by the Connecticut Legislature. ... Jacob Druckman (June 26, 1928 – May 24, 1996) was an American composer born in Philadelphia. ...

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 237,946
1800 251,002 5.5%
1810 261,942 4.4%
1820 275,248 5.1%
1830 297,675 8.1%
1840 309,978 4.1%
1850 370,792 19.6%
1860 460,147 24.1%
1870 537,454 16.8%
1880 622,700 15.9%
1890 746,258 19.8%
1900 908,420 21.7%
1910 1,114,756 22.7%
1920 1,380,631 23.9%
1930 1,606,903 16.4%
1940 1,709,242 6.4%
1950 2,007,280 17.4%
1960 2,535,234 26.3%
1970 3,031,709 19.6%
1980 3,107,576 2.5%
1990 3,287,116 5.8%
2000 3,405,565 3.6%
Est. 2006 3,504,809 2.9%
Sources:[26][27]
Connecticut Population Density Map
Connecticut Population Density Map

As of 2005, Connecticut has an estimated population of 3,510,297,[28] which is an increase of 11,331, or 0.3%, from the prior year and an increase of 104,695, or 3.1%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 67,427 people (that is 222,222 births minus 154,795 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 41,718 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 75,991 people, and migration within the country produced a net loss of 34,273 people. Based on the 2005 estimates, Connecticut moves from the 29th most populous state to 30th.[28] The United [[States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Image File history File links Connecticut_population_map. ... Image File history File links Connecticut_population_map. ... Net migration rates for 2006: positive (blue), negative (orange) and stable (green). ...


6.6% of its population was reported as being under 5 years old, 24.7% under 18 years old, and 13.8% were 65 years of age or older. Females made up approximately 51.6% of the population, with 48.4% male.


In 1790, 97% of the population in Connecticut were classified as "rural". The first census in which less than half the population was classified as rural was 1890. In the 2000 census, it was only 12.3%. Most of western and southern Connecticut is strongly associated with New York City; this area is the most affluent and populous region of the state. A portion of rural eastern Connecticut is somewhat culturally influenced by Boston. This split has caused a lack of more than a few professional sport teams. ie: NHL hockey since the mid 1990s, NFL football, MLS soccer and men's basketball. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


The center of population of Connecticut is located in the town of Cheshire.[29] Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated 1780 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager Michael A. Milone  - Council Matt Hall, Mayor Elizabeth Esty, D-1 Thomas Ruocco, R-2 Diane Visconti, D-3 Tim White, R-4 Matthew Altieri D-at large Michael Ecke D-at large David Orsini, R...


Race, ancestry, and language

Demographics of Connecticut (csv)
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 87.09% 10.46% 0.73% 2.83% 0.13%
2000 (Hispanic only) 8.31% 1.04% 0.14% 0.07% 0.04%
2005 (total population) 86.09% 10.88% 0.76% 3.56% 0.15%
2005 (Hispanic only) 9.74% 1.09% 0.16% 0.07% 0.05%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 1.89% 7.19% 6.59% 29.77% 15.41%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) -0.11% 7.16% 3.74% 30.12% 16.21%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 20.87% 7.40% 18.36% 14.98% 13.68%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

As of 2004, 11.4% of the population (400,000) was foreign-born, and 10% of the foreign-born in the state were illegal aliens (about 1.1% of the population). In 1870, native-born Americans had accounted for 75% of the state's population, but that had dropped to 35% by 1918. Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ...


As of 2000, 81.69% of Connecticut residents age 5 and older spoke English at home and 8.42% spoke Spanish, followed by Italian at 1.59%, French at 1.31% and Polish at 1.20%.[30] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


The five largest reported ancestries in the state are: Italian (18.6%), Irish (16.6%), English (10.3%), German (9.9%), and French/French Canadian (9.9%). English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... A French American or Franco-American is a citizen of the United States of America of French descent and heritage. ...


Connecticut has large Italian American, Irish American and English American populations, as well as German American and Portuguese American populations, second highest percentage of any state behind Rhode Island (19.3%). Italian is the largest ancestry group in five of the state's counties, while the Irish are the largest group in Tolland county, French Canadians the largest group in Windham county, and old stock New England Yankees are present throughout. African Americans and Hispanics (mostly Puerto Ricans) are numerous in the urban areas of the state. Like Ohio and New York, Connecticut is also known for its relatively large Hungarian American population, the majority of which live in and around Fairfield, Stamford, Naugatuck and Bridgeport. Connecticut also has a sizable Polish American population, with New Britain containing the largest Polish American population in the state. An Italian-American is an American of Italian descent either born in America or someone who has immigrated. ... Irish population density in the United States, 1872. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... German Americans are citizens of the United States of German ancestry. ... Portuguese Americans are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates in the southwest European nation of Portugal. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For the Major League Baseball team, see New York Yankees. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... Hungarian-American refers to American citizens with Hungarian ethnicity. ... Fairfield is a common place name in several English-speaking countries. ... There is more than one place named Stamford. ... Naugatuck is a borough located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ... Bridgeport is the name of a number of places in the United States of America: Bridgeport, Alabama Bridgeport, California Bridgeport, Chicago Bridgeport, Connecticut - by far the largest city with this name Bridgeport, Illinois Bridgeport, Michigan Bridgeport, Ohio Bridgeport, New Jersey Bridgeport, Pennsylvania Bridgeport, Washington Bridgeport, West Virginia See also: Bridgeport... Polish-American refers to American citizens of Polish descent. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1850 Incorporated (city) 1870 Consolidated 1905 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Timothy T. Stewart Area  - Total 34. ... Polish-American refers to American citizens of Polish descent. ...


More recent immigrant populations include those from Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, Panama, and former Soviet countries. CCCP redirects here. ...


Religion

A 2001 survey of Connecticut residents' religious self-identification showed the following distribution of affiliations:[31]

There is a significant Jewish population in the state, concentrated in the towns near Long Island Sound between Greenwich and New Haven, in Greater New Haven and in Greater Hartford, especially the suburb of West Hartford. Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... -1... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... -1... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... For more general information about religious denominations that follow the teachings of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Alternate meanings: see Church of Christ (disambiguation). ... The Assemblies of God is the worlds largest Pentecostal Christian denomination. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1640 Joined Connecticut 1656 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Peter Tesei  - Town administrator Edward Gomeau  - Town meeting moderator Thomas J. Byrne Area  - Total 174. ... New Haven redirects here. ... The Greater New Haven area is the metropolitan area whose extent includes those towns in Connecticut that share an economic, social, political, and historical focus on New Haven, Connecticut. ... The Greater Hartford region is a region located in the state of Connecticut centered around the states capital of Hartford. ... Motto: Where City Style meets Village Charm Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated 1854 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager James Francis   - Town council Scott Slifka, Mayor Art Spada, Deputy Mayor Shari Cantor Barbara Carpenter Charles Coursey Maureen K. McClay Mark C. Sinatro Carolyn Thornberry Joseph Verrengia Area  - Total 58. ...


Recent immigration has brought other non-Christian religions to the state, but the numbers of adherents of other religions are still low.


Connecticut is also home to New England's Largest Protestant Church The First Cathedral in Bloomfield, Connecticut located in Hartford County. The First Cathedral, is a Christian ministry based in Bloomfield, Connecticut. ... Bloomfield is a town located in Hartford County, Connecticut. ... Hartford County is located in the north central part of the state of Connecticut. ...


Economy

Connecticut welcome sign being updated as Rell takes office on July 1, 2004.
Connecticut welcome sign being updated as Rell takes office on July 1, 2004.
Connecticut state welcome sign
Connecticut state welcome sign

The total gross state product for 2006 was $204 billion. The per capita income for 2007 was $54,117, ranking first among the states.[32] There is, however, a great disparity in incomes through the state; although New Canaan has one of the highest per capita incomes in America, Hartford is one of the ten cities with the lowest per capita incomes in America. Should Hartford (or similar cities New Haven and Bridgeport) be combined with its immediate suburbs, it would rank as one of the richest cities in the country. Image File history File links RellTakesOver. ... Image File history File links RellTakesOver. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (787x786, 139 KB) The reverse side of the Connecticut State Quarter. ... Gross state product is a measurment of the economic output of a U.S. state or an Australian state. ... Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... Connecticut is the second richest state in the United States of America, with a per capita income of $28,766 (2000) and a personal per capita income of $43,173 (2003). ...


New Canaan is the wealthiest town in Connecticut, with a per capita income of $85,459. Darien, Greenwich, Weston, Westport and Wilton also have per capita incomes over $65,000. Hartford is the poorest town in Connecticut, with a per capita income of $13,428 in 2000.[33] There are other lower-income and blue-collar towns, mostly parts of towns, in the eastern part of the State. New Canaan is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States, 8 miles (13 km) northeast of Stamford, on the Five Mile River. ... Connecticut is the second richest state in the United States of America, with a per capita income of $28,766 (2000) and a personal per capita income of $43,173 (2003). ... Darien is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1640 Joined Connecticut 1656 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Peter Tesei  - Town administrator Edward Gomeau  - Town meeting moderator Thomas J. Byrne Area  - Total 174. ... Weston is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Incorporated 1835 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Gordon F. Joseloff  - Town meeting moderator Alice H. Shelton Area  - City 86. ... Wilton is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, in the United States. ...


Taxation

Prior to 1991, Connecticut had a highly populist income tax system. Income from employment was untaxed, but income from investments was taxed at the highest rate in the United States: 13%. And this burden was further increased by the method of calculation: no deductions were allowed for the cost (for example, interest on borrowing) of producing the investment income. Under Governor Lowell P. Weicker, Jr., an Independent, this was reformed to the present system. Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


This system prior to 1991 made it an attractive haven for high-salaried earners fleeing the heavy taxes of New York State, but highly unattractive for members of Wall Street partnerships. It put an enormous burden on Connecticut property tax payers, particularly in the cities with their more extensive municipal services. State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ... This article needs to be wikified. ...


With Weicker's 1991 tax reform, the tax on employment and investment income was equalized at a then-maximum of 4%. Since then, Greenwich, Connecticut, has become the headquarters of choice for a large number of America's largest hedge funds, and Connecticut income from that industry has soared. Today the income tax rate on Connecticut individuals is divided into two tax brackets of 3% and 5%.[34] All wages of a Connecticut resident are subject to the state's income tax, even when the resident works outside of the state. However, in those cases, Connecticut income tax must be withheld only to the extent the Connecticut tax exceeds the amount withheld by the other jurisdiction. Since New York state has higher tax rates than Connecticut, this effectively means that Connecticut residents that work in New York state pay no income tax to Connecticut. A hedge fund is a private investment fund that charges a performance fee and a management fee. ... A wage is a compensation which workers receive in exchange for their labor. ...


Connecticut levies a 6% state sales tax on the retail sale, lease, or rental of most goods. Some items and services in general are not subject to sales and use taxes unless specifically enumerated as taxable by statute. There are no additional sales taxes imposed by local jurisdictions. During the summer there is one week of duty free buying to spur retail sales. A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... The Statute of Grand Duchy of Lithuania A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ...


All real and personal property located within the state of Connecticut is taxable unless specifically exempted by statute. All assessments are at 70% of fair market value. Another 20% of the value may be taxed by the local government though. The maximum property tax credit is $500 per return and any excess may not be refunded or carried forward.[34] Connecticut does not levy an intangible personal property tax. Fair Market Value is a term in both law and accounting to describe an appraisal based on an estimate of what a buyer would pay a seller for any piece of property. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ...


Real estate

Homes in southwestern Connecticut on the fringes of the New York City metropolitan area are quite expensive. Many towns have median home prices over $500,000, with some more desirable homes exceeding $1 million. Fairfield County has the most expensive real estate market in Connecticut, with most houses selling at over $1.5 million and many costing several million. Connecticut has the most multi-million dollar homes in the northeast, and the second most in the nation after California, with 3.3% of homes in Connecticut priced over one million dollars in 2003.[35] In 2007, the median price for a house in Connecticut passed $300,000 for the first time, even though most of the country was mired in a real estate slump.[36] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Industries

The agricultural output for the state is nursery stock, eggs clams and lobster, dairy products, cattle, and tobacco. Its industrial outputs are transportation equipment (especially helicopters, aircraft parts, and nuclear submarines), heavy industrial machinery and electrical equipment, military weaponry and fabricated metal products, chemical and pharmaceutical products, and scientific instruments. A nursery is a place where plants are propagated, usually for sale as a business, though some gardeners and farmers keep private nurseries. ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... Dairy products are generally defined as foodstuffs produced from milk. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... Flying machine redirects here. ... USS Los Angeles A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate underwater. ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ... Captain Nemo and Professor Aronnax contemplating measuring instruments in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea A Love Meter at a Framingham, Massachusetts Rest Stop. ...


Due to the prominence of the aircraft industry in the state, Connecticut has an official state aircraft, the F4U Corsair, and an official Connecticut Aviation Pioneer, Igor Sikorsky. The state officially recognizes aircraft designer Gustav Whitehead as "Father of Connecticut Aviation" for his research into powered flight in Bridgeport, Connecticut in 1901, two years before the Wright brothers at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.[37] Governor John Dempsey also declared August 15 to be "Gustave Whitehead Day".[38] The Chance Vought F4U Corsair was an American fighter aircraft that saw service in World War II and the Korean War (and in isolated local conflicts). ... For another meanings and similar spellings, see Sikorsky. ... Gustave Whitehead with an early engine. ... Bridgeport redirects here. ... The Wright brothers, Orville (19 August 1871 – 30 January 1948) and Wilbur (16 April 1867 – 30 May 1912), were two Americans who are generally credited[1][2][3] with inventing and building the worlds first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human... Kitty Hawk is a town located in Dare County, North Carolina. ...


A report issued by the Connecticut Commission on Culture & Tourism on December 7, 2006 demonstrated that the economic impact of the arts, film, history and tourism generated more than $14 billion in economic activity and 170,000 jobs annually. This provides $9 billion in personal income for Connecticut residents and $1.7 billion in state and local revenue.[39] is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Transportation

Map of Connecticut showing major highways
Map of Connecticut showing major highways

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1588x1288, 1826 KB) Template:Pd-USGov-Atlas File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Connecticut ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1588x1288, 1826 KB) Template:Pd-USGov-Atlas File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Connecticut ...

Roads

The Interstate highways in the state are I-95 (the Connecticut Turnpike) running southwest to northeast along the coast, I-84 running southwest to northeast in the center of the state, I-91 running north to south in the center of the state, and I-395 running north to south near the eastern border of the state. The other major highways in Connecticut are the Merritt Parkway and Wilbur Cross Parkway, which together form State Route 15, running from the Hutchinson River Parkway in New York State parallel to I-95 before turning north of New Haven and running parallel to I-91, finally becoming a surface road in Berlin, Connecticut. Route 15 and I-95 were originally toll roads; they relied on a system of toll plazas at which all traffic stopped and paid fixed tolls. A series of terrible crashes at these plazas eventually contributed to the decision to remove the tolls in 1988.[40] Other major arteries in the state include U.S. Route 7 in the west running parallel to the NY border, State Route 8 farther east near the industrial city of Waterbury and running north-south along the Naugatuck River Valley nearly parallel with U.S. 7, and State Route 9 in the east. See List of State Routes in Connecticut for an overview of the state's highway system. Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ... Interstate 95, the main north-south Interstate Highway on the East Coast of the United States, runs in a general east-west compass direction for 111. ... The Connecticut Turnpike, more currently known as the Governor John Davis Lodge Turnpike, is a freeway in Connecticut that runs from Byram to South Killingly. ... Interstate 84 (abbreviated I-84) is an interstate highway extending from Dunmore, Pennsylvania (near Scranton, Pennsylvania) at an intersection with Interstate 81 to Sturbridge, Massachusetts at an intersection with the Massachusetts Turnpike (Interstate 90). ... Interstate 91 is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ... Interstate 395 (abbreviated I-395) is a 67-mile-long north-south interstate highway that begins at Interstate 95 in East Lyme, Connecticut and ends at Interstate 90 in Auburn, Massachusetts, where it becomes Interstate 290. ... Merritt Parkway in autumn. ... The Wilbur Cross Parkway is a limited access highway in Connecticut, comprising the portion of Route 15 between Milford and Meriden. ... Route 15 (CT-15) is a highway in Connecticut that runs 83. ... The Hutchinson Parkway from Mamaroneck Avenue. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... Berlin is a town located in Hartford County, Connecticut. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A toll road, turnpike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a fee for use. ... Original-style Vermont US 7 shield with embossed features United States Highway 7 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 309 miles (497 km) from northern Vermont to Norwalk, Connecticut. ... Route 8 is a 67. ... Route 9 is a 40. ... Below is a list of Connecticut state highways. ...


Between New Haven and the New York City, I-95 is one of the most congested highways in the United States. Many people now drive longer distances to work in the New York City area. This strains the three lanes of traffic capacity, resulting in lengthy rush hour delays. Frequently, the congestion spills over to clog the parallel Merritt Parkway. The state has encouraged traffic reduction schemes, including rail use and ride-sharing.[41] For other uses, see Rush hour (disambiguation). ... Carpooling is shared use of a car, in particular for commuting to work, often by people who each have a car but travel together to save costs. ...


Connecticut also has a very active bicycling community, with one of the highest rates of bicycling ownership and use in the United States. New Haven's cycling community, organized in a local advocacy group called ElmCityCycling, is particularly active. According to the U.S. Census 2006 American Community Survey, New Haven has the highest percentage of commuters who bicycle to work of any major metropolitan center on the East Coast. Founded in 2001, ElmCityCycling is a cycling advocacy group based in New Haven, Connecticut. ...


Public transportation

Rail

Since many Connecticut residents commute to New York City, there is an extensive commuter railway network connecting New York City to New Haven on Metro North Railroad (a commuter railroad based in New York and operated by the Metropolitan Transit Authority) with spurs servicing Waterbury, Danbury, and New Canaan. Rail service does not end with New Haven, however. Connecticut is in the heart of Amtrak's Northeast Corridor and the Amtrak Regional line makes stops in New Haven-State Street, Old Saybrook, New London, and Mystic. Smaller town stops between New Haven and New London are served by Shore Line East, which takes commuters to those stations to catch a main train. These commuter services are heavily utilized during weekday rush hours. Regional rail service is provided by Amtrak, which makes regular stops in Stamford, Bridgeport, New Haven, and Hartford, as well as in Wallingford, Meriden, Berlin, Windsor, and Windsor Locks. Operation of commuter trains from New Haven to Springfield on Amtrak's New Haven-Springfield Line is scheduled to begin in 2010.[42] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... New Haven redirects here. ... Metro-North (officially MTA Metro-North Railroad) is a suburban commuter railroad running service from New York City to the northern suburbs in New York State and Connecticut. ... Most of the NEC (those sections shown in red, except Boston to the Rhode Island state line) is owned by Amtrak. ... Shore Line East (SLE) is a commuter rail service operating in southern Connecticut, USA. A fully owned subsidiary of the Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT), SLE provides weekday service along the Northeast Corridor from New London west to New Haven, with continuing service to Bridgeport and Stamford, and connecting service... Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... The New Haven-Springfield Line is a railroad line owned by Amtrak from New Haven, Connecticut north to Springfield, Massachusetts. ...


Bus

Statewide bus service is supplied by Connecticut Transit, owned by the Connecticut Department of Transportation, with smaller municipal authorities providing local service. Bus networks are an important part of the transportation system in Connecticut, especially in urban areas like Hartford, Stamford, Norwalk, Bridgeport and New Haven. A three-year construction project to build a busway from New Britain to Hartford will begin in August 2009.[43][44] Autobus redirects here. ... Connecticut Transit (CT Transit) is a bus system serving much of the U.S. state of Connecticut and is a division of that states Department of Transportation[1]. CT Transit provides bus service via contract providers for seven different metropolitan areas in the state, mostly concentrated in Hartford and... The Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT) is responsible for the development and operation of highways, railroads, mass transit systems, ports, waterways and aviation facilities in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ...


Air

Bradley International Airport, which became truly 'International' in the summer of 2007 beginning service to Europe, is located in Windsor Locks, 15 miles (24 km) north of Hartford. Regional air service is provided at Tweed-New Haven Airport. Larger civil airports include Danbury Municipal Airport and Waterbury-Oxford Airport in western Connecticut. The Westchester County Airport in Harrison, New York serves part of southwestern Connecticut. BDL redirects here. ... Windsor Locks is a town located in Hartford County, Connecticut. ... Hartford redirects here. ... Tweed-New Haven Airport (IATA Airport Code HVN) is a municipal airport offering commercial and general service in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Danbury Municipal Airport (IATA:DXR, ICAO:KDXR) is a small general aviation airport in Danbury, Connecticut. ... Waterbury-Oxford Airport (IATA: OXC, ICAO: KOXC) is a public airport located three miles (5 km) north of the town of Oxford, in New Haven County, Connecticut, USA. It is operated by the Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT). ... HPN redirects here. ... Harrison is a town/village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ...


Law and government

See also: Administrative divisions of Connecticut
The Connecticut State Capitol in downtown Hartford
The Connecticut State Capitol in downtown Hartford

Hartford has been the sole capital of Connecticut since 1875. Before then, New Haven and Hartford alternated as capitals.[19] The primary political subdivisions of the state of Connecticut are its towns. ... The Connecticut State House The Connecticut State House is located in the capital of Hartford, Connecticut and houses the State Senate and House of Representatives. ... Hartford redirects here. ... New Haven redirects here. ...


Constitutional history

Connecticut is known as the “Constitution State.” While the origin on this title is uncertain, the nickname is assumed to reference the Fundamental Orders of 1638–39. These Fundamental Orders represent the framework for the first formal government written by a representative body in Connecticut. The government has operated under the direction of four separate documents in the course of Connecticut Constitutional History. After the Fundamental Orders, Connecticut was granted governmental authority by King Charles II of England through the Connecticut Charter of 1662. While these two documents acted to lay the ground work for the state’s government, both lacked essential characteristics of a constitution. The Fundamental Orders and the Connecticut Charter could both be altered simply by a majority vote of the General Assembly. Separate branches of government did not exist during this period, and the General Assembly acted as the supreme authority. A true constitution was not adopted in Connecticut until 1818. Finally, the current state constitution was implemented in 1965. The 1965 constitution absorbed a majority of its 1818 predecessor, but incorporated a handful of important modifications. Another possible source of the nickname "constitution state" comes from Connecticut's pivotal role in the federal constitutional convention of 1787, during which Roger Sherman and Oliver Ellsworth helped to orchestrate what became known as the Connecticut Compromise, or the Great Compromise. This plan combined the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan to form a bicameral legislature, a form copied by almost every state constitution since the adoption of the federal constitution. The Fundamental Orders were adopted by the Connecticut Colony council on January 14, 1638. ... Connecticut is known as the “constitution state. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Michael Fedele, (R) since January 3, 2007 Speaker of the House James Amann, (D) since January 5, 2005 Members 187 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Connecticut State Capitol, Hartford, Connecticut Web... Oliver Ellsworth (April 29, 1745 – November 26, 1807), an American lawyer and politician, was a revolutionary against British rule, a drafter of the United States Constitution, and third Chief Justice of the United States. ... The Connecticut Compromise, also known as the Great Compromise, was an essential agreement between large and small states reached during the Philadelphia Convention of 1787 that in part defined the legislative structure and representation that each state would have under the United States Constitution. ... The Virginia Plan (also known as the Randolph Plan, after its sponsor, or Large-State Plan) was a proposal by Virginia delegates, drafted by James Madison while he waited for a quorum to assemble at the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. ... The New Jersey Plan was a proposal for the structure of the United States Government proposed by William Paterson on June 15, 1787. ...


Executive

The governor heads the executive branch. The current Governor of Connecticut is M. Jodi Rell (Republican). The current Lieutenant Governor is Michael Fedele. From 1639 until the adoption of the 1818 constitution, the governor presided over the General Assembly. Connecticut was the first state in the United States to elect a woman as governor without electing her husband first, Ella Grasso in 1974. // Further information: List of colonial governors of Connecticut Home of Governor Frank Weeks, Middletown, Connecticut, 1909 ^ According to the Connecticut State Library, governors are numbered started with John Haynes, the first governor of Connecticut Colony. ... Connecticut welcome sign, updated with new governors name as Rell takes office on July 1, 2004 Mary Jodi Rell (born June 16, 1946) is a Republican politician who became the 72nd Governor of the U.S. state of Connecticut on July 1, 2004. ... The following is a list of Deputy or Lieutenant Governors of the State of Connecticut, from the Colonial period through present day. ... Michael Fedele, a Republican, is Connecticuts 107th Lieutenant Governor. ... Ella Rose Tambussi Grasso (May 10, 1919 - February 5, 1981) was an American politician. ...


There are several executive departments: Administrative Services, Agriculture, Banking, Children and Families, Consumer Protection, Correction, Economic and Community Development, Developmental Services, Education, Environmental Protection, Higher Education, Information Technology, Insurance, Labor, Mental Health and Addiction Services, Military, Motor Vehicles, Public Health, Public Safety, Public Utility Control, Public Works, Revenue Services, Social Services, Transportation, Veterans Affairs. In addition to these departments, there are other independent bureaus, offices and commissions.[45]


In addition to the Governor and Lieutenant Governor, there are four other executive officers named in the state constitution that are elected directly by voters: Secretary of State, Treasurer, Comptroller and Attorney General. All executive officers are elected to four year terms.[19]


Legislative

The legislature is the General Assembly. The General Assembly is a bicameral body consisting of an upper body, the State Senate (36 senators); and a lower body, the House of Representatives (151 representatives).[19] Bills must pass each house in order to become law. The governor can veto the bill, but this veto can be overridden by a two-thirds majority in each house. Senators and representatives, all of whom must be at least eighteen years of age, are elected to two-year terms in November on even-numbered years. The Lieutenant Governor presides over the senate, except when absent from the chamber, when the President Pro Tempore presides. The Speaker of the House presides over the House; James A. Amann is the current Speaker of the House of Connecticut. The Democrats currently hold the majority in both houses of the General Assembly. A Legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to create, amend and ratify laws. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Michael Fedele, (R) since January 3, 2007 Speaker of the House James Amann, (D) since January 5, 2005 Members 187 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Connecticut State Capitol, Hartford, Connecticut Web... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The Connecticut State Senate is the upper house of the Connecticut General Assembly. ... The Hall of the Connecticut House of Representatives. ... James A. Amann (born 1956, in Bridgeport, Connecticut) is a Connecticut State Representative. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


Connecticut's U.S. senators are Christopher J. Dodd (Democrat) and Joseph I. Lieberman (Connecticut for Lieberman, Independent Democrat) who is part of the Democratic Caucus. Connecticut currently has five representatives in the U.S. House, four of whom are Democrats. Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944), is an American politician. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a Jewish-American Democratic politician and a current U.S. senator from Connecticut. ... Connecticut for Lieberman is the Connecticut political party created by twenty-five supporters of Senator Joe Lieberman, its sole candidate for office. ... For the Iraqi electoral formation led by Adnan Pachachi, see Assembly of Independent Democrats. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Connecticut to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ...


Judicial

The highest court of Connecticut's judicial branch is the Supreme Court, headed by the Chief Justice of Connecticut. The Supreme Court is responsible for deciding on the constitutionality of the law or cases as they relate to the law. Its proceedings are similar to those of the United States Supreme Court, with no testimony given by witnesses, and the lawyers of the two sides each present oral arguments no longer than thirty minutes. Following a court proceeding, the court may take several months to arrive at a judgment. The current Chief Justice is Chase T. Rogers. A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... -1...


In 1818, the court became a separate entity, independent of the legislative and executive branches.[46] The Appellate Court is a lesser state-wide court and the Superior Courts are lower courts that resemble county courts of other states.


Local government

See also: Administrative divisions of Connecticut and several lists: List of municipalities of Connecticut by population, List of towns in Connecticut, List of cities in Connecticut, Borough (Connecticut), List of counties in Connecticut

Connecticut has 169 towns, which serve as the fundamental local political subdivision of the state; the entire state is divided into towns.[19] Connecticut shares a local form of government with the rest of New England called the New England town. There are also 21 cities,[19] most of which are coterminous with their namesake towns and have a merged city-town government. There are two exceptions: City of Groton, which is a subsection of the Town of Groton and the City of Winsted in the Town of Winchester. There are also nine incorporated boroughs which may provide additional services to a section of town.[19][47] One, Naugatuck, is a consolidated town and borough. The primary political subdivisions of the state of Connecticut are its towns. ... This is a list of municipalities in Connecticut in order of population from highest to lowest. ... The U.S. state of Connecticut is divided into 169 towns. ... This page lists all municipalities incorporated as cities in the state of Connecticut. ... In the U.S. state of Connecticut, a borough is an incorporated area that typically provides services to a section (usually urban in nature) of a town. ... List of Connecticut counties: Connecticut counties Fairfield County: one of four original counties created in Connecticut in 1666. ... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ... Groton is a city located in New London County, Connecticut. ... Waterfront of Groton, Connecticut looking upriver Groton is a town located on the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. ... Winsted is a census-designated place and an incorporated city in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Winchester is a town located in Litchfield County, Connecticut. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Naugatuck is a borough located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ...


Unlike most other states, Connecticut does not have county government. Connecticut county governments were mostly eliminated in 1960, with the exception of the sheriff system.[48] In 2000, the county sheriff was abolished and replaced with the state marshal system, which has districts that follow the old county territories. The judicial system is divided, at the trial court level, into judicial districts which largely follow the old county lines.[49] The eight counties are still widely used for purely geographical and statistical purposes, such as weather reports, and census reporting. A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... List of Connecticut counties: Connecticut counties Fairfield County: one of four original counties created in Connecticut in 1666. ... Modern weather predictions aid in timely evacuations and potentially save lives and property damage Human beings have attempted to predict the weather since time immemorial. ...


The state is divided into 15 planning regions defined by the state Office of Planning and Management.[50] The Intragovernmental Policy Division of this Office coordinates regional planning with the administrative bodies of these regions. Each region has an administrative body known as either a regional council of governments, a regional council of elected officials, or a regional planning agency. The regions are established for the purpose of planning "coordination of regional and state planning activities; designation or redesignation of logical planning regions and promotion of the continuation of regional planning organizations within the state; and provision for technical aid and the administration of financial assistance to regional planning organizations."[50] The primary political subdivisions of the state of Connecticut are its towns. ...


Politics

Presidential elections results[51]
Year Republican Democratic
2004 43.95% 693,826 54.31% 857,488
2000 38.44% 561,094 55.91% 816,015
1996 34.69% 483,109 52.83% 735,740
1992 35.78% 578,313 42.21% 682,318
1988 51.98% 750,241 46.87% 676,584
1984 60.73% 890,877 38.83% 569,597
1980 48.16% 677,210 38.52% 541,732
1976 52.06% 719,261 46.90% 647,895
1972 58.57% 810,763 40.13% 555,498
1968 44.32% 556,721 49.48% 621,561
1964 32.09% 390,996 67.81% 826,269
1960 46.27% 565,813 53.73% 657,055

Connecticut leans strongly towards the Democratic Party. However, Connecticut has a high number of voters who are not registered with a major party. As of 2004, 33.7% of registered voters were registered Democratic, 22.0% were registered Republican, and 44.0% were unaffiliated with any party, with 0.2% registered with a minor party.[52] GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


Many Connecticut towns show a marked preference for moderate candidates of either party. Democrats hold a registration edge especially in the cities of Hartford; New Haven; and Bridgeport, where Democratic machines have held power since the great immigration waves of the 1800s. The state's Republican-leaning areas are the rural Litchfield County and adjoining towns in the west of Hartford County, the industrial towns of the Naugatuck River Valley, and some of the affluent Fairfield County towns near the New York border. The suburban towns of New Canaan and Darien in Fairfield County are considered the most Republican areas in the state, the former being the hometown of conservative activist Ann Coulter. Westport, a wealthy town a few miles to the east, is often considered one of the most loyally-Democratic, liberal towns in Fairfield County. Norwalk and Stamford, two larger, affluent communities in Fairfield County, have in many elections favored moderate Republicans including former Governor John G. Rowland and Congressman Chris Shays, however they have favored Democrats in recent US presidential candidates. Waterbury has a Democratic registration edge, but usually favors conservative candidates in both parties. In Danbury unaffiliated voters outnumber voters registered with either major party. Other smaller cities including Meriden, New Britain, and Middletown favor Democratic candidates. Hartford redirects here. ... New Haven redirects here. ... Bridgeport redirects here. ... Litchfield County is located in the northwestern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Hartford County is located in the north central part of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... The Naugatuck River Valley is a region of the state of Connecticut located in the central-southwest of the state, and is focused around the southern reaches of the Naugatuck and Housatonic Rivers. ... Fairfield County is located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... This article is about the state. ... New Canaan is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States, 8 miles (13 km) northeast of Stamford, on the Five Mile River. ... Darien is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Incorporated 1835 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Gordon F. Joseloff  - Town meeting moderator Alice H. Shelton Area  - City 86. ... Norwalk is a city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... John Rowland redirects here. ... Christopher H. Shays, usually known as Chris Shays (born October 18, 1945), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1987, representing the 4th District of Connecticut, which includes 17 towns in Southwest Connecticut. ... Nickname: Motto: Quid Aere Perennius (What Is More Lasting Than Brass) Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , Country U.S. State NECTA Waterbury Region Central Naugatuck Valley Incorporated (town) 1686 Incorporated (city) 1853 Consolidated 1902 Government  - Type Mayor-board of aldermen  - Mayor Michael J. Jarjura Area  - City  28. ... Nickname: Located in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1702 Incorporated (city) 1889 Consolidated 1965 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Mark D. Boughton (R) Area  - City 114. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1806 Incorporated (city) 1867 Consolidated 1922 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Council leaders Mark Benigni, Mayor Matthew C. Dominello, Deputy Mayor Stephen T. Zerio, Council Leader Keith Gordon, Deputy Leader Patricia D. Lynes, Deputy Leader  - City manager Lawrence J. Kendzior Area  - City... Nickname: Location within the state of Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1850 Incorporated (city) 1870 Consolidated 1905 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Timothy T. Stewart Area  - Total 34. ... Nickname: Forest City Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Region Midstate Region Incorporated (town) 1651 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1923 Government type Mayor-council Mayor Sebastian N. Giuliano Area    - City 42. ...


Democrats hold veto-proof majorities in both houses of the Connecticut General Assembly. In 2006, Republicans were reduced from three out of five to one out of five federal congressional seats. The remaining Republican, Chris Shays, is the only Republican from New England in the U.S. House of Representatives in the current Congress and is also one of the most liberal Republicans in the House. Christopher Dodd and Joseph Lieberman are Connecticut's U.S. senators. The senior Dodd is a Democrat while the junior Lieberman serves as an Independent Democrat caucusing with Senate Democrats after his victory on the Connecticut for Lieberman ballot line in the 2006 general election. Lieberman's predecessor, Lowell P. Weicker, Jr., was the last Connecticut Republican to serve as Senator. Weicker was known as a liberal Republican. He broke with President Richard Nixon during Watergate and successfully ran for governor in 1990 as an independent, creating A Connecticut Party as his election vehicle. Before Weicker, the last Republican to represent Connecticut in the Senate was Prescott Bush, the father of former President George H.W. Bush and the grandfather of President George W. Bush. He served from 1953–1963. Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Michael Fedele, (R) since January 3, 2007 Speaker of the House James Amann, (D) since January 5, 2005 Members 187 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Connecticut State Capitol, Hartford, Connecticut Web... Christopher H. Shays, usually known as Chris Shays (born October 18, 1945), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1987, representing the 4th District of Connecticut, which includes 17 towns in Southwest Connecticut. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... The 110th United States Congress will be in session from noon on January 3, 2007 until noon on January 3, 2009. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a Jewish-American Democratic politician and a current U.S. senator from Connecticut. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... For the Iraqi electoral formation led by Adnan Pachachi, see Assembly of Independent Democrats. ... Connecticut for Lieberman is the Connecticut political party created by twenty-five supporters of Senator Joe Lieberman, its sole candidate for office. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Watergate redirects here. ... The A Connecticut Party was a party formed by former Republican Senator and gubenatorial candidate Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. ... GOP redirects here. ... Prescott Sheldon Bush (May 15, 1895 – October 8, 1972) was a United States Senator from Connecticut and a Wall Street executive banker with Brown Brothers Harriman. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...

Further information: U.S. presidential election, 2004, in Connecticut

In 2004, New Englands state of Connecticut was easily won by the challenger John Kerry by a margin of 10. ...

Political corruption

Several mayors, state legislators, and government employees have been convicted and imprisoned for crimes ranging from bribery to racketeering. In 2004, Governor John G. Rowland, a Republican, was forced to resign when it was discovered he helped steer state contracts to firms that offered him gifts and free vacations.[53] Following his resignation, he pled guilty to corruption charges and served ten months in federal prison. Former Waterbury Mayor and 2000 GOP Senate candidate Philip Giordano was stripped of power in 2001 after a corruption investigation had to be cut short when phone taps unexpectedly revealed alleged sexual acts with 8- and 10-year-old minor girls and other possible child sex offenses.[54] In 2003, he was convicted and sentenced to 37 years in federal prison.[55] Democrats have been convicted of corruption as well, most notably former Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim. The current Mayor of Bridgeport, John Fabrizi admitted to using cocaine while in office, but has stayed on while not running for re-election.[56][57] In August 2007 Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez announced he had been investigated for ties to a city contractor. [2] And in December 2007 in Enfield, former Mayor Patrick L. Tallarita (D) has been named in a lawsuit over an alleged threatening confrontation with a man at a grocery store.[3] John Rowland redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Quid Aere Perennius (What Is More Lasting Than Brass) Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , Country U.S. State NECTA Waterbury Region Central Naugatuck Valley Incorporated (town) 1686 Incorporated (city) 1853 Consolidated 1902 Government  - Type Mayor-board of aldermen  - Mayor Michael J. Jarjura Area  - City  28. ... Philip Giordano (1963-) is the former Republican mayor of Waterbury, Connecticut and a convicted sex offender. ... John Michael Fabrizi is the mayor of Bridgeport, Connecticut and a member of the U.S. Democratic Party. ... Eddie Pérez, born Eduardo Rafael Pérez (May 4, 1968 in Ciudad Ojeda, Zulia State, Venezuela), is a Major League Baseball catcher who plays for the Atlanta Braves (2004-present). ...


Several state agencies, including the Department of Transportation (DOT), Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), and Department of Children and Families (DCF) have been rocked by scandals over the past decade. The Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT) is responsible for the development and operation of highways, railroads, mass transit systems, ports, waterways and aviation facilities in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ...


A more recent scandal involved a botched construction project on Interstate 84 near Waterbury. An independent audit of the project in late 2006 revealed that over 300 storm drains installed by the now-defunct L.G. DeFelice Construction Company, were either filled with sand, were improperly installed, or were connected with pipes that led to nowhere. In addition to the faulty storm drains, officials discovered light fixtures with defective mounting brackets when one of the fixtures fell off of its support pole and onto the highway. Inspectors also discovered the structural steel for an overpass was not properly installed, raising serious questions about the bridge's structural integrity. Following the uncovering of this scandal, Attorney-General Richard Blumenthal filed suit against L.G. DeFelice, its bonding company USF&G, and the consultants (the Maguire Group) hired by CONNDOT to oversee the project, resulting in a $17.5 million settlement to fix the problems. A federal grand jury and FBI investigation were also launched into the operations of L.G. DeFelice before the company ceased operations in 2004. Several CONNDOT employees were fired after being implicated in the scandal, and are also subjects of state and federal investigations for allegedly taking bribes in exchange for covering up substandard work on the I-84 project. Finally, the scandal prompted the Connecticut General Assembly to consider contract reform legislation and Governor M. Jodi Rell to order a complete reorganization of CONNDOT. Interstate 84 (abbreviated I-84) is an interstate highway extending from Dunmore, Pennsylvania (near Scranton, Pennsylvania) at an intersection with Interstate 81 to Sturbridge, Massachusetts at an intersection with the Massachusetts Turnpike (Interstate 90). ... Richard Blumenthal, Connecticut Attorney General was awarded the Raymond E. Baldwin Award for Public Service by the Quinnipiac University School of Law in 2002 Richard Blumenthal is the 23rd elected Attorney General of Connecticut. ... USF&G was a Baltimore, Maryland based insurance company that was acquired by the Saint Paul Companies in 1998. ... In the American common law legal system, a grand jury is a type of jury which determines if there is enough evidence for a trial. ... Bribery is a crime implying a sum or gift given alters the behaviour of the person in ways not consistent with the duties of that person. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Michael Fedele, (R) since January 3, 2007 Speaker of the House James Amann, (D) since January 5, 2005 Members 187 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Connecticut State Capitol, Hartford, Connecticut Web... Connecticut welcome sign, updated with new governors name as Rell takes office on July 1, 2004 Mary Jodi Rell (born June 16, 1946) is a Republican politician who became the 72nd Governor of the U.S. state of Connecticut on July 1, 2004. ...


On June 1, 2007 Connecticut Senate Minority Leader Louis DeLuca (R-Woodbury) was arrested on conspiracy charges after it was discovered he was dealing with a local Mafia boss who is currently facing federal charges stemming from his trash-hauling operations,[58] and allegations that he tried to use these same ties to intimidate the husband of his granddaughter, whom he claimed was abusing her. is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Connecticut State Senate is the upper house of the Connecticut General Assembly. ... Louis DeLuca is a Republican Party politician in the United States. ...


Following Rowland's resignation, the state legislature passed a campaign finance reform bill that bans contributions from lobbyists and state contractors in future campaigns.[59]


Education

Connecticut is well-known as the home of Yale University, which maintains a consistent ranking as one of the world's most renowned universities, and has one of the most selective undergraduate programs of any university in the United States (an 8.6% acceptance rate in 2006).[60][61] Yale is one of the largest employers in the state, and its research activity has recently spun off dozens of growing biotechnology companies. Yale redirects here. ...


Connecticut is also the host of many other academic institutions, including Sacred Heart University (1964),Quinnipiac University (1929), Trinity College (1823) and Wesleyan University (1832). The University of Connecticut has been the highest ranked public university in New England for eight years running, according to U.S. News and World Report. Sacred Heart University, the second-largest Catholic university in New England, offers more than 50 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs. ... Quinnipiac University is a private four-year university in Hamden, Connecticut, located on about 500 acres (2 km²), just north of New Haven. ... Trinity College is a private liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Wesleyan University is a private liberal arts college founded in 1831 and located in Middletown, Connecticut. ... The University of Connecticut is the State of Connecticuts land-grant university. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Additionally, the State has many noted boarding schools, including Miss Porter's School, Choate Rosemary Hall, Hotchkiss, Westminster School, Pomfret School, Avon Old Farms, Loomis Chaffee, Salisbury School and The Taft School which draw students from all over the world. Also Connecticut has many noted private day schools such as Holy Cross High School located in Waterbury, Kingswood-Oxford School located in West Hartford, the Hopkins School in New Haven, St. Lukes School in New Canaan and the Williams School in New London. A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... Miss Porters School, sometimes simply referred to as Farmington, is a preparatory school for girls, located in Farmington, Connecticut. ... Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall (commonly referred to as Choate) is a New England preparatory school for students in grades 9-12, known as the third through sixth forms at the school. ... Hotchkiss may refer to: Benjamin B. Hotchkiss - a 19th century American engineer Hotchkiss et Cie - Hotchkiss Company, a French arms and car manufacturer set up by Benjamin Hotchkiss; full name: Société Anonyme des Anciens Etablissements Hotchkiss et Cie Hotchkiss gun - a product of the Hotchkiss company Hotchkiss machine gun... Westminster School was founded by William Lee Cushing in 1888 as a boys’ school in Dobbs Ferry, New York. ... Pomfret School was founded by William E. Peck in 1894 on the principles of intellectual rigor and the development of character. ... Avon Old Farms is a single-sex boarding school for boys located in Avon, Connecticut. ... The Loomis Chaffee School is a college preparatory school for grades 9 through 12 located in historic Windsor, Connecticut, U.S. It has a total enrollment of 720, 400 boarding and 320 day students, and 150 faculty members. ... Salisbury School is an all-boys, private college-preparatory school founded in 1901 and located in Salisbury, Connecticut. ... The Taft School is a private coeducational prep school located in Watertown, Connecticut, USA. The School was founded by Horace Dutton Taft in 1890. ... Holy Cross High School Holy Cross High School is a Catholic secondary school founded in Waterbury, Connecticut in 1968 by the Congregation of Holy Cross. ... Waterbury is the name of some places in the United States of America: Waterbury, Connecticut Waterbury, Vermont This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Kingswood-Oxford School is a private day school located on Trout Brook Drive in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... West Hartford is the name of some places in the United States of America: West Hartford, Connecticut West Hartford, Vermont (See also Hartford. ... For the Minnesota school, see Hopkins Senior High School; for the university, see Johns Hopkins University. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... New Canaan is a town located in Fairfield County, Connecticut. ... The Williams School is a coeducational independent high school located on the campus of Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut. ...

See also: List of colleges and universities in Connecticut for a comprehensive listing.
See also: List of school districts in Connecticut

The following is a list of colleges and universities in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... List of school districts in Connecticut by county, and (below that) list of district reference groups used by the state Department of Education to compare similar districts for purposes of assessing achievement. ...

Sports

Club Sport League
Bridgeport Sound Tigers Ice hockey American Hockey League
Danbury Mad Hatters Ice hockey Eastern Professional Hockey League
Hartford Wolf Pack Ice hockey American Hockey League
Connecticut Defenders Baseball Minor League Baseball (AA)
New Britain Rock Cats Baseball Minor League Baseball (AA)
Bridgeport Bluefish Baseball Atlantic League
Manchester Silkworms Baseball New England Collegiate Baseball League
Danbury Westerners Baseball New England Collegiate Baseball League
Stamford Robins Baseball Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League
Torrington Twisters Baseball New England Collegiate Baseball League
Connecticut Sun Basketball Women's National Basketball Association
Connecticut Roller Girls Flat Track Roller Derby Women's Flat Track Roller Derby Association
New Haven Warriors Rugby American National Rugby League
Connecticut Wildcats Rugby American National Rugby League
  • Since 1952, a PGA Tour golf tournament has been played in the Hartford area. Originally called the "Insurance City Open" and later the "Greater Hartford Open," the event is now know as the Travelers Championship.

The Pilot Pen Tennis Tournament is held annually at the Connecticut Tennis Center at Yale University. The Bridgeport Sound Tigers are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is a professional ice hockey league in North America, that serves as the primary developmental circuit for the National Hockey League (NHL). ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Eastern Professional Hockey League (EPHL) was a minor professional ice hockey league which operated primarily in Ontario and Quebec from 1959 to 1963. ... The Hartford Wolf Pack are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is a professional ice hockey league in North America, that serves as the primary developmental circuit for the National Hockey League (NHL). ... League Eastern League Division Northern Division Year founded 1995 Major League affiliation San Francisco Giants Home ballpark Thomas J. Dodd Memorial Stadium Previous home ballparks City Norwich, Connecticut Current uniform colors black, blue, silver Previous uniform colors black, orange Logo design the wordmark Defenders superimposed over a black ring and... This article is about the sport. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... League Eastern League Division Northern Division Year founded 1995 Major League affiliation Minnesota Twins Home ballpark New Britain Stadium Previous home ballparks Beehive Field City New Britain, Connecticut Current uniform colors red, black Previous uniform colors {{{previous colors}}} Logo design The wordmark Rock Cats in red outlined in black with... This article is about the sport. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... League affiliations Atlantic League of Professional Baseball Liberty Division  Name Bridgeport Bluefish (1998-present) Team Colors navy blue, aqua, silver Ballpark The Ballpark at Harbor Yard Championships League titles: 1 (1999) Division titles: 4 (1998, 1999, 2002, 2006)  Owner(s)/Operated By: Get Hooked LLC General Manager: Todd Marlin Manager... This article is about the sport. ... The Atlantic League has operated since 1998 The Atlantic League of Professional Baseball Clubs, Inc. ... The Manchester Silkworms are a baseball team located in Manchester, Connecticut playing in the NECBL. The team plays at the Northwest Park. ... This article is about the sport. ... The New England Collegiate Baseball League (NECBL) is a 12-team amateur summer baseball league founded in 1993 and sanctioned by the NCAA and Major League Baseball. ... This article is about the sport. ... The New England Collegiate Baseball League (NECBL) is a 12-team amateur summer baseball league founded in 1993 and sanctioned by the NCAA and Major League Baseball. ... The Stamford Robins are a baseball team that plays in the Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League, an NCAA summer baseball league. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League (ACBL) is a baseball league located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... The New England Collegiate Baseball League (NECBL) is a 12-team amateur summer baseball league founded in 1993 and sanctioned by the NCAA and Major League Baseball. ... The Connecticut Sun are a Womens National Basketball Association team based in Uncasville, Connecticut. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... The New Haven Warriors (also often known as simply The Warriors) are a semi-professional rugby league club located in New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... The American National Rugby League (sometimes referred to as the AMNRL) is the major rugby league tournament for semi-professional clubs in the United States; currently there are eleven teams predominantly based on the north-east coast competing annually in this competition. ... The Connecticut Wildcats is an American semi-professional rugby league football team based in Norwalk, Connecticut. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... The American National Rugby League (sometimes referred to as the AMNRL) is the major rugby league tournament for semi-professional clubs in the United States; currently there are eleven teams predominantly based on the north-east coast competing annually in this competition. ... The Hartford Whalers were an American professional ice hockey team based in Hartford, Connecticut. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... The Carolina Hurricanes are a professional ice hockey team based in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42, Shea Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964-present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... National league can refer to: National Basketball League, in the United States and Canada, which merged with the rival Basketball Association of America to form the National Basketball Association National Football League, the major American football league in the United States National Hockey League, the major ice hockey league in... The Hartford Dark Blues were a 19th century baseball team. ... NFL redirects here. ... Hartford Blues of the National Football League played only in 1926. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Hartford Civic Center is a sports and convention complex located in Hartford, Connecticut, USA owned by the City of Hartford and operated by Madison Square Garden Connecticut under contract with the Connecticut Development Authority. ... The PGA Tour is an organization that operates the USAs main professional golf tours. ... The Travelers Championship is a golf tournament on the PGA Tour. ...


The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC) is the state's sanctioning body for high school sports. Xavier High School (Middletown, CT) claimed the 2005 Class LL football championship. Other state champions in football include Staples (in Westport), Greenwich High School (Greenwich, CT) 2006 state LL champions, Branford, Daniel Hand (in Madison), Woodland Regional (in Beacon Falls), East Lyme High School (in East Lyme), Hyde Leadership (in Hamden), Southington High School (in Southington). The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC) is the governing body of secondary school athletics in the state of Connecticut. ... Xavier High School is an all-boys Catholic high school run by the Xaverian Brothers. ...


Famous residents

George Walker Bush, President of the United States, was born in Connecticut. He is a member of the Bush political family, with roots in the state extending three generations. Other notable figures from the state span American political and cultural history, including Ralph Nader, Eli Whitney, Benedict Arnold, Nathan Hale, Harriet Beecher Stowe, John Brown, Eugene O'Neill, Charles Ives, Katharine Hepburn, and Roger Sherman. The state is often associated with American author Mark Twain, who resided there for a short period of time, although he felt more of a connection to his native Missouri, as demonstrated by his frequent mention of Missouri in his writing. This list includes Connecticut natives and other notable individuals who have established a residence in the state. ... For other persons of the same name, see George Bush. ... Barbara Bush, Jeb Bush, George H.W. Bush, Laura Bush, and George W. Bush watch tee ball on the White House lawn. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney, author, lecturer, political activist, and candidate for President of the United States in five elections. ... For other uses, see Eli Whitney (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Benedict Arnold, see Benedict Arnold (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Nathan Hale, see Nathan Hale (disambiguation). ... Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American author and abolitionist, whose novel Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) attacked the cruelty of slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential, even in Britain. ... John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was a white American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection as a means to abolish all slavery. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... This photo from around 1913 shows Ives in his day job. He was the director of a successful insurance agency. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Shermans marble statue in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


See also

  • List of Connecticut-related topics

References

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  2. ^ Q. What Do You Call Someone From Connecticut? About.com: Hartford. Accessed 2008-4-24
  3. ^ Population Estimates for All Places: 2000 to 2006: Connecticut SUB-EST2006-04-09.xls. United States Census Bureau. Last accessed 2007-10-16.
  4. ^ State Data from the State and Metropolitan Area Data Book: 2006. United States Census Bureau. Last accessed 2007-10-16.
  5. ^ a b c GCT-PH1-R. Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density (geographies ranked by total population): 2000. United States Census Bureau. Last accessed 2007-02-20.
  6. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on 2006-11-03.
  7. ^ Connecticut - Definitions from Dictionary.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  8. ^ Highest wages in East, lowest in South. USA Today (29 November 2005).
  9. ^ Census 2000. United States Census Bureau (18 March 2000).
  10. ^ Mount Frissell-South Slope. peakbagger.com.
  11. ^ The Southwick Jog.
  12. ^ Connecticut's Southwick Jog. Connecticut State Library.
  13. ^ Connecticut's "Panhandle". Connecticut State Library.
  14. ^ Annual average number of tornadoes. NOAA National Climatic Data Center. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  15. ^ a b Bowen, Clarence Winthrop: Boundary Disputes of Connecticut: Boston, Massachusetts: 1882. P. 17-18.
  16. ^ a b Flick, Alexander C., Editor: History of the State of New York. Volume 2: New York, New York: Columbia University Press, 1933-1937: P. 50-57
  17. ^ Connecticut Colony Charter of 1662
  18. ^ Migration from Connecticut By Barbara Lacey, Connecticut's Heritage Gateway website.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g CT.gov: About Connecticut. Retrieved on 2005-12-18.
  20. ^ The Regicides in New England, by Frederick Hull Cogswell.
  21. ^ roadscape.com/nutmeg.html.
  22. ^ Connecticut's Nicknames. Connecticut State Library.
  23. ^ See Yankee main article.
  24. ^ See National Statuary Hall Collection
  25. ^ Connecticut State Troubadour; CT Commission on Culture & Tourism Arts Division website; retrieved January 4, 2007
  26. ^ Population: 1790 to 1990 census.gov
  27. ^ Resident Population of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico: Census 2000 census.gov
  28. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto Rico: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2005 (CSV). 2005 Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division (June 21, 2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-17.
  29. ^ Population and Population Centers by State: 2000. US Census Bureau.
  30. ^ Most spoken languages in Connecticut. MLA Language Map. The Modern Language Association. Retrieved on 2007-01-16.
  31. ^ Mayer, Egon; Kosmin, Barry A., Keysar, Ariela (2001). American Religious Identification Survey, Key Findings, Exhibit 15. City University of New York. Retrieved on 2007-01-04.
  32. ^ CT Named Richest State (HTML). The Hartford Courant (2008-03-26).
  33. ^ Connecticut per capita income, median household income, and median family income at State, County and Town level: Census 2000 data
  34. ^ a b Connecticut income tax instructions
  35. ^ Christie, Les. "Million Dollar Homes", CNN.com, 23 February 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-23. 
  36. ^ UConn in the News: August 2007
  37. ^ O'Dwyer, Maj. William J. (October 1998). "The "Who Flew First" Debate". Flight Journal. Air Age Media. 
  38. ^ Delear, Frank (March 1996). "Gustave Whitehead and the First-Flight Controversy". Aviation History. 
  39. ^ The Economic Impact of the Arts, Film, History, and Tourism Industries in Connecticut (Highlights) Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism
  40. ^ Connecticut Turnpike (I-95) nycroads.com
  41. ^ ctrides.com
  42. ^ Reitz, Stephanie. "Conn. looks into building rail line from Springfield to New Haven", The Boston Globe, The New York Times Company, 2006-07-30. Retrieved on 2007-01-29. 
  43. ^ State of Connecticut (2006-10-31). "New Britain-to-Hartford ‘Busway’ Receives Final Federal Design Approval". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-01-29.
  44. ^ New Britain-Hartford Rapid Transit Project Schedule
  45. ^ Connecticut's Executive Branch of Government. ct.gov.
  46. ^ History of the Connecticut Courts. Last retrieved 2007-02-20.
  47. ^ Connecticut's Boroughs and Cities. Connecticut State Library. Accessed 20 January 2007.
  48. ^ Connecticut State Register and Manual: Counties. Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  49. ^ State of Connecticut Judicial Branch
  50. ^ a b Regional Planning Coordination at the CT Office of Planning and Management
  51. ^ Presidential General Election Results Comparison - Connecticut. Dave Leip's Atlas of United States Presidential Elections (2005). Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  52. ^ Party Enrollment in Connecticut. Connecticut Office of the Secretary of State. Last retrieved 2007-02-22.
  53. ^ "Connecticut governor announces resignation", CNN.com, 1 July 2004. Retrieved on 2007-01-20. 
  54. ^ "Federal Child Sex Charges Against Republican Mayor Giordano", New York Daily News, 23 November 2001. Retrieved on 2007-01-20. 
  55. ^ "Ex-Republican Mayor in Connecticut Is Sentenced to 37 Years for Sex Abuse", New York Times (AP), 14 June 2003. Retrieved on 2007-01-20. 
  56. ^ "Politics top state stories of 2006", The Stamford Times (AP). Retrieved on 2007-01-20. 
  57. ^ Cummings, Bill. "Fabrizi: I used coke", Connecticut Post, 21 June 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-20. 
  58. ^ State Sen. DeLuca arrested. WTNH Channel 8 New Haven, June 1, 2007
  59. ^ Brennan Center for Justice (1 December 2005). "Connecticut Legislature Passes Sweeping Campaign Finance Reform Bill". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  60. ^ "College acceptance rates: How many get in?", USA Today, 8 November 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-20. 
  61. ^ Lutts, Chloe. "Class of 2010 acceptance rate lowest in University history", The Brown Daily Herald, 4 April 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-20. 

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Boston redirects here. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Major League Baseball team, see New York Yankees. ... Part of the National Statuary Hall Collection The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The comma-separated values (or CSV; also known as a comma-separated list or comma-separated variables) file format is a file type that stores tabular data. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym pronounced ), is the public university system of New York City. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) is an American media company best known as the publisher of its namesake, The New York Times. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Connecticut Post is a daily newspaper, serving the area of Southwestern Connecticut around Bridgeport, Connecticut. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Government

  • State of Connecticut - Official state website
  • Connecticut State Databases - Annotated list of searchable databases produced by Connecticut state agencies and compiled by the Government Documents Roundtable of the American Library Association.
  • Connecticut State Register & Manual - updated annually
  • Directory of Web sites of Connecticut towns and cities

Tourism

  • CTVisit.com - Official state tourism website
  • Connecticut travel guide from Wikitravel

Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...

History

  • Connecticut Society of Genealogists (Est. 1968)
  • Connecticut Historical Society
  • USGS real-time, geographic, and other scientific resources of Connecticut
  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • Connecticut State Facts
  • History topics timeline of Connecticut 1738-1838

Civic and business organizations

  • Connecticut Junior Chamber (Jaycees)
  • Connecticut Newspapers
  • Connecticut Business & Industry Association
  • The Connecticut Business Hall Of Fame


Preceded by
Georgia
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Ratified Constitution on January 9, 1788 (5th)
Succeeded by
Massachusetts

Coordinates: 41.6° N 72.7° W Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... -1... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands Map showing the location of the islands in the Pacific Ocean (highlighted with red boxes) The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America and is... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Connecticut: History, Geography, Population, and State Facts — Infoplease.com (426 words)
Connecticut leads New England in the production of eggs, pears, peaches, and mushrooms, and its oyster crop is the nation's second largest.
University of Connecticut - Connecticut, University of Connecticut, University of, mainly at Storrs; coeducational; land grant...
Connecticut's fuel cell industry maintains dominance: state now home to almost half of U.S. fuel cell jobs; future looks bright.(Techcetera)...
Connecticut - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5608 words)
Connecticut is bordered on the south by Long Island Sound, on the west by New York State, on the north by Massachusetts, and on the east by Rhode Island.
The Interstate highways in the state are I-95 (the Connecticut Turnpike) running southwest to northeast along the coast, I-84 running southwest to northeast in the center of the state, I-91 running north to south in the center of the state, and I-395 running north to south near the eastern border of the state.
Connecticut is well-known as the home of Yale University, which maintains a consistent ranking as one of the world's greatest and richest universities, and has the most selective undergraduate program of any university in the United States (an 8.6% acceptance rate in 2006).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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