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Encyclopedia > Conn of the Hundred Battles

Conn Cétchathach (Conn of the Hundred Battles) was a legendary High King of Ireland. He was the ancestor of the Connachta, and, through his descendant Niall Noígiallach, the Uí Néill dynasties. His father was either Fedlimid Rechtmar or Óenlám Gaba, and his mother is sometimes given as Medb Lethderg. His son was Art mac Cuinn. Some stories of the Fenian Cycle are set in his time. Although the traditional list of those bearing the title High King of Ireland (Irish: Ard Rí Éirinn) goes back thousands of years, into the second millennium BC, most scholars believe that the earlier parts of the list, at least, are largely mythical. ... The Connachta were a group of dynasties who claimed descent from the three eldest sons of Eochaid Mugmedon: Brion, Ailill and Fiachrae. ... Niall of the Nine Hostages (Irish: Niall Noigíallach) was a High King of Ireland who was active early-to-mid 5th century, dying - according to the latest estimates - around 450/455. ... The Uí Néill (Irish for of the grandson (descendant) of Niall) were an Irish dynasty who claimed descent from Niall Noigiallach (Niall of the Nine Hostages), a semi-historical High King of Ireland who died about 405. ... Fedlimid Rechtmar (Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar), son of Tuathal Teachtmhar, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 2nd century. ... In Irish mythology Medb Lethderg (red-side) (not to be confused with queen Medb of Connacht) was a goddess of sovereignty associated with Tara. ... Art mac Cuinn, aka Art Óenfer (the lone or solitary - he was the only one of his fathers many children to survive to adulthood), was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 2nd century. ... The Fenian Cycle also known as the Fionn Cycle, Finn Cycle, Fianna Cycle, Finnian Tales, Fian Tales, Féinne Cycle, Feinné Cycle, Ossianic Cycle and Fianaigecht, is a body of prose and verse centering on the exploits of the mythic hero Fionn mac Cumhaill and his warriors the Fianna Éireann. ...


He gained the throne by overthrowing Mal, who had killed his father. He earned his epithet Cétchathach in his wars with the Dál nAraide. MAL stands for Mobile Allocation Lists and is a term used in GSM. MAL also stands for Mobile Application Link, an API for synchronizing data between mobile devices and central servers, originally developed by AvantGo. ...


His rival for the kingship of Ireland was the king of Munster, Éogan Mór, also known as Mug Nuadat, who beat him in ten battles and took half of Ireland from his control. Mug was able to gain such power because his druid predicted a famine, which he prepared for by storing grain. Ireland is sometimes seen as divided between Leth Cuinn, Conn's Half, in the north, and Leth Moga, Mug's Half, in the south. Munster (Irish: An Mhumhain, IPA: ) is the southernmost province of Ireland, comprising the counties of Clare, Cork, Kerry, Limerick, Tipperary and Waterford. ... In Irish traditional history Mug Nuadat (or Mogha Nuadhad) meaning slave of Nuada, whose given name was Éogan Mór (Eoghan the Great), was a king of Munster in the 2nd century A.D. He was a rival of the High King, Conn of the Hundred Battles and for a... Arch-Druid in his full Judicial Costume (1845 etching) In Celtic polytheism the word Druid denotes the priestly class in ancient Celtic societies, which existed through much of Western Europe north of the Alps and in the British Isles. ...


Mug was killed when Conn led a night attack against his forces with all of his tribal leaders save one behind him. Conn's forces ultimately overwhelmed Mug's army, and Mug was killed in the process.


Mal's son Tibride Tirech killed Conn at Tara, having sent fifty warrior dressed as women against him from Emain Macha. The Hill of Tara, located near the River Boyne, is today a mound in County Meath, Leinster, Ireland, on which the grass has veiled the rich heritage of the country. ... Categories: Ireland-place stubs | Ulster cycle ...

Preceded by:
Cathair Mor
High King of Ireland
AFM 122-157
FFE 116-136
Succeeded by:
Conaire

Cathair Mor was a second-century Irish monarch who ruled for only two or three years, principally by conducting bloody wars. ... The High Kingship of Ireland was a pseudohistorical construct of the eighth century AD, a projection into the distant past of a political entity that did not become reality until the ninth century. ... Signature page from the Annals of the Four Masters Entry for A.D. 432 The Annals of the Four Masters or the Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters are a chronicle of medieval Irish history. ... Seathrún Céitinn, known in English as Geoffrey Keating, was a 17th century Irish clergyman, poet and historian. ... Conaire, son of Mug Láma, was a legendary High King of Ireland, said to have ruled in the 2nd century. ...

Family tree

 Conn Cétchathach | | Art mac Cuinn | | Cormac mac Airt | | Cairbre Lifechair | | Fiachu Sraibtine | | Muiredach Tirech | | Eochaid Mugmedon + Mongfind + Cairenn | | _________|_________ | | | | | | | | | Brion Fiachrae Ailill Niall (The Connachta) | __________________________|_______________________________________________________ | | | . | | | | | | | | . | | | | | Conall Gulban Endae Eogan . Coirpre Lóegaire Maine Conall Cremthainne Fiachu | . | | ________|________ | . | | | | Muirdeach . Cormac Caech Lughaid Fergus Cerrbel Ardgal | . | (d.507) | | . | | Muirchertach . Tuathal Diarmaid mac Ercae . Maelgarb mac Cearbhaill (d.536) . (d.544) (d.565) . (Northern Uí Néill) . (Southern Uí Néill) 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Conn of the Hundred Battles. Conn Cead Chath, or Ced-Cathach. King of Ireland. Irish Mythology; Celtic Hero. (1085 words)
Conn was slain in 157 A. by Tiobraide Tireach, king of Uladh, at Tuath Amrois, near Tara, while preparing to celebrate the feis (festival) of Tara.
Conn of the Hundred Battles was the ancestor of the families of O'Neill, O'Donnell, O'Kelly, O'Malley, O'Flaherty, Maguire, etc. He was succeeded by King Conaire II.
The first of these was Conn of the Hundred Battles, a huge and fierce warrior, red-haired, with mighty limbs, headlong and impetuous, a man blazing with ceaseless energy, who seldom or never was out of his battle harness.
Conn of the Hundred Battles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (260 words)
Conn Cétchathach (Conn of the Hundred Battles) was a legendary High King of Ireland.
Mug was killed when Conn led a night attack against his forces with all of his tribal leaders save one behind him.
Conn's forces ultimately overwhelmed Mug's army, and Mug was killed in the process.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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