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Encyclopedia > Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith

The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) (Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei) is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. Among the most active of these major Curial departments, it oversees Catholic doctrine. It is related to the Roman Inquisition both historically and in their goal: to protect and advocate faithful Catholic teaching on matters of faith and morals. A congregation is a type of dicastery of the Roman Curia, the central administrative organism of the Catholic Church. ... The Roman Curia - usually (though inaccurately) called the Vatican - is the administrative apparatus of the Holy See, coordinating and providing the necessary organisation for the correct functioning of the Roman Catholic Church and the achievement of its goals. ... Doctrine, from Latin doctrina, (compare doctor), means a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the body of teachings in a branch of knowledge or belief system. ... The Roman Inquisition began in 1542 when Pope Paul III established the Holy Office as the final court of appeal in trials of heresy and served as an important part of the Counter-Reformation. ... The word faith has various uses; its central meaning is similar to belief, trust or confidence, but unlike these terms, faith tends to imply a transpersonal rather than interpersonal relationship – with God or a higher power. ...

Contents


Role

According to Article 48 of the Apostolic Constitution on the Roman Curia, Pastor Bonus, promulgated by Pope John Paul II on June 28, 1988: "the duty proper to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith is to promote and safeguard the doctrine on the faith and morals throughout the Catholic world: for this reason everything which in any way touches such matter falls within its competence." An Apostolic constitution (Latin constitutio apostolica) is a very solemn decree issued by the Pope of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from October 16, 1978 until his death, making his the second-longest pontificate, with the exception of St. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


History

On July 21, 1542 Pope Paul III, with the Constitution Licet ab initio, established the Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Roman and Universal Inquisition, staffed by cardinals and other officials whose task it was "to maintain and defend the integrity of the faith and to examine and proscribe errors and false doctrines". It served as the final court of appeal in trials of heresy and served as an important part of the Counter-Reformation. In reaction to the excesses of the Spanish Inquisition, it was tightly controlled by strict procedural rules under the administration of Francisco Peña. July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... Paul III, né Alessandro Farnese (February 29, 1468 – November 10, 1549) was pope from 1534 to 1549. ... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official in the Roman Catholic Church, ranking just below the Pope and appointed by him as a member of the College of Cardinals during a consistory. ... The word faith has various uses; its central meaning is similar to belief, trust or confidence, but unlike these terms, faith tends to imply a transpersonal rather than interpersonal relationship – with God or a higher power. ... The supreme court in some countries, provinces, and states, is the highest court in that jurisdiction and functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be appealed. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the Catholic or Orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... The Counter-Reformation or the Catholic Reformation was a strong reaffirmation of the doctrine and structure of the Catholic Church, climaxing at the Council of Trent, partly in reaction to the growth of Protestantism. ... // Pedro Berruguete. ...


This body was renamed the Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Holy Office in 1908 by Pope Saint Pius X. It was changed to Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith on December 7, 1965, at the end of the Second Vatican Council. In 1983, with the new code of Canon law, "Sacred" was dropped from the names of Vatican Congregations. 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Pope Saint Pius X, born Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto (2 June 1835 – 20 August 1914), was Pope from 1903 to 1914, succeeding Pope Leo XIII. He was the first pope since the Counter-Reformation Pope St. ... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, (Vatican two) was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Organization

Until 1968, the Pope himself held the title of prefect but never exercised this office. Instead, he appointed one of the cardinals to preside over the meetings, first as Secretary, then as Pro-Prefect. The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ...


Since 1968, the Cardinal head of the dicastery has borne the title of full Prefect. There are usually ten other cardinals on the Congregation, as well as a prelate and two assistants. Dicasteries (from Greek: δικαστ, judge/juror) are the central offices of the Roman Curia in which the stewardship of the Roman Catholic Church is entrusted. ... Look up prelate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The work of the Congregation is divided into four sections: the doctrinal office, the disciplinary office, the matrimonial office, and that for priests. The Congregation holds plenary assemblies annually.


Members (2005):

  • Prefect: William Cardinal Levada
  • Secretary: Angelo Amato
  • Under-secretary: P. Joseph Augustine Di Noia, O.P.
  • Promotor of Justice: Charles Scicluna
  • Staff of 33
  • 25 members: cardinals, archbishops and bishops
  • 28 consultors

On 6 May 2006 Antonio Cardinal Canizares and Jean-Pierre Cardinal Ricard were named members of the Congregation. William Joseph Levada William Joseph Cardinal Levada, (born 15 June 1936, Long Beach, California) is a Roman Catholic cardinal, currently serving in the Roman Curia as Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-Pierre Cardinal Ricard (born 25 September 1944,Marseille, France) is a cardinal of the Roman Catholic church and archbishop of Bordeaux et Bazes. ...


Recent opinions and publications

  • Dominus Iesus (2000)[1]
  • Considerations Regarding Proposals to Give Legal Recognition to Unions Between Homosexual Persons (2002)[2]
  • The Da Vinci Code: According to Reuters news service, Archbishop Angelo Amato said at a 2006 Church conference in Rome that if "such lies and errors had been directed at the Koran or the Holocaust they would have justly provoked a world uprising." [3]

Dominus Iesus (Latin for Lord Jesus) is a document by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, then prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, and the Congregations then secretary, Tarcisio Bertone. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The Da Vinci Code book cover The Da Vinci Code is a novel written by American author Dan Brown and published in 2003 by Doubleday Fiction (ISBN 0385504209). ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY) is best known as a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ...

Prefects

Alfredo Cardinal Ottaviani (October 29, 1890 - August 3, 1979) was Secretary of the Holy Office of the Roman Curia from 1953 to 1966 when that dicastery was reorganized as the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith, in which he served as Pro-Prefect, until 1968. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... His Eminence Franjo Šeper (born October 2, 1905 in Osijek (Austria-Hungary, now Croatia), died December 30, 1981 in Rome) was a Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, and prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith from 1968 to his death. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: , born Josef Alois Ratzinger on April 16, 1927 in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria, Germany) is the 265th[1] and reigning Pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church, and sovereign of Vatican City State. ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from October 16, 1978 until his death, making his the second-longest pontificate, with the exception of St. ... Death is the full cessation of vital functions in the biological life. ... William Joseph Levada William Joseph Cardinal Levada, (born 15 June 1936, Long Beach, California) is a Roman Catholic cardinal, currently serving in the Roman Curia as Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Secretaries

Rafael Cardinal Merry del Val y Zulueta (October 10, 1865 - February 26, 1930) was a Roman Catholic Cardinal (Cardinal Priest of Basilica di Santa Prassede) from 1903 until his death. ... October 14 is the 287th day of the year (288th in Leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Donato Raffaele Cardinal Sbaretti Tazza (November 1856-April 1, 1939) was an Italian Roman Catholic prelate whose career included pastoral service in Italy and Cuba, diplomatic service in America and the Pacific, and ultimately high office in the Roman Curia. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Francesco Cardinal Marchetti-Selvaggiani (October 1, 1871_January 13, 1951) was an Italian Roman Catholic prelate who spent his entire career in the Roman Curia and rose to Dean of the College of Cardinals and head of the Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Holy Office. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Giuseppe Cardinal Pizzardo (July 13, 1877-August 1, 1970) was named a Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church by Pope Pius XI in the consistory of 1937. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Venetiis, M. D. LXIIII. The Index Librorum Prohibitorum (List of Prohibited Books) is a list of publications which the Catholic Church censored for being a danger to itself and the faith of its members. ... Crimen sollicitationis is a secret document issued by the Holy Office of the Vatican (now the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith) in 1962, instructing bishops about how to handle cases in which priests were accused of using the privacy of the confessional to make sexual advances to penitents. ...

External links

  • Homepage on Holy See website
  • Brief presentation on Holy See website
  • Vatican website announcing Levada's nomination
  • Giga-Catholic Information

  Results from FactBites:
 
Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (531 words)
The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) (Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei) is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia.
On July 21, 1542 Pope Paul III, with the Constitution Licet ab initio, established the Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Roman and Universal Inquisition, staffed by cardinals and other officials whose task it was "to maintain and defend the integrity of the faith and to examine and proscribe errors and false doctrines".
It was changed to Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith on December 7, 1965, at the end of the Second Vatican Council.
Doctrine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (353 words)
Doctrine, from Latin doctrina (compare doctor), means "a code of beliefs", "a body of teachings" or "instructions", taught principles or positions, as the body of teachings in a branch of knowledge or belief system.
In matters of foreign policy, a doctrine is a body of axioms fundamental to the exercise of a nation's foreign policy.
Doctrines of this sort are almost always presented as the personal creations of one particular political leader, whom they are named after.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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