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Encyclopedia > Confederate States of America dollar
Six Confederate notes
Six Confederate notes

The Confederate States of America dollar was first issued into circulation in April, 1861, when the Confederacy was only two months old, and on the eve of the outbreak of the Civil War. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x818, 197 KB) Summary 6 confederate states of america currency notes SOurce URL: http://memory. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x818, 197 KB) Summary 6 confederate states of america currency notes SOurce URL: http://memory. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (traditional) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic President... This article is becoming very long. ...


Notes were ultimately issued in $.10, $.50, $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100, $500, and $1000 denominations with a variety of designs, issuers and redeemable obligations. The total amount of currency issued under the various acts of the Confederate Congress totaled $1.7 billion. Bills were released in 72 different note "types" in seven "series" between 1861 and 1865. The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ...


Owing to the vast number of Confederate notes and varietals, not to mention the fact that Southern states and banks could issue their own notes, counterfeiting was a major problem for the Confederacy. Many of these contemporary counterfeits are known today and can be worth as much to a collector as a real note. A $50 banknote from North Carolina, printed in 1863 and in circulation until 1864. ... BRD-SG in IaÅŸi - A small branch dedicated to retail services For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Designs

The South, being limited in skilled engravers and printers as well as secure printing facilities, often had to make do with unrelated designs in early banknote issues. Some such were abstract depictions of mythological gods and goddesses. Southern themes did prevail with designs of African-American slaves, naval ships, and historical figures, including George Washington. Images of slaves oftentimes had them depicted as smiling or happily carrying about their work. Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ... The word printer is used to describe a company that provides commercial printing services, involving typesetting, printing and book-binding. ... Look up deity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga class cruiser. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first president of the United States under the U.S. Constitution. ...


Since most of the engravers and bank plates were in the North, Southern printers had to lift by offset or lithographic process scenes that had been used on whatever notes they had access to. Many variations in plates, printing and papers also appear in most of the issues, due in large part to the limits on commerce resulting from the Union embargo of Confederate ports.


Later note issues pictured notable Southern politicians, military leaders, and citizens. Some Southerners who appeared on CSA currency included Jefferson Davis, Alexander Stephens, Lucy Pickens, George Randolph, and Stonewall Jackson. Jefferson Finis Davis (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American politician who served as President of the Confederate States of America for its entire history from 1861 to 1865 during the American Civil War. ... This is an article about the Confederate Vice President. ... Lucy Holcombe Petway Pickens (June 11, 1832 - August 8, 1899) was a 19th Century American socialite, known during and after her lifetime as the Queen of the Confederacy. ... George Wythe Randolph (March 10, 1818–April 3, 1867), the Secretary of War for the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War, was born in Charlottesville, Virginia at Monticello to Thomas Mann Randolph Jr. ... For other uses of Stonewall Jackson, see Stonewall Jackson (disambiguation). ...


Signatures

C.S.A. notes were hand signed, with exception to the 50 cent issues that had the printed signatures of Robert Tyler and Edward C. Elmore. The first six notes issued were hand signed by the Register and Treasurer themselves. While hand signatures were considered an anti-counterfeiting tool, the sheer number of bills being produced could not reasonably be signed individually by two men each. Women clerks were often hired to sign "for Register" and "for Treasurer"; up to 200 clerks were eventually hired for each. Registrar may refer to: In education, a registrar or registry is an official in an academic institution (a college, university, or secondary school) who handles student records. ... In many governments, a treasurer is the person responsible for running the treasury. ...


Coinage

Confederate penny.
A Confederate Half Dollar struck at New Orleans in 1861.
A Confederate Half Dollar struck at New Orleans in 1861.

As the Civil War continued, the cost of the war loomed large. Any precious metals available in the South often made their way to Europe to procure war goods. But the CSA did manage to mint a few coins. In 1861, Mr. Robert Lovett Jr. of Philadelphia was commissioned to design, engrave, and make a one cent piece for the Confederacy. He used the Liberty Head for the obverse. Using nickel, he made a few samples, of which only 12 are currently known to exist. Fearing prosecution for aiding the enemy, he stopped his work, and hid the coins and dies in his cellar. The original dies were purchased later and used to make restrikes. Image File history File links Confederate_penny. ... Image File history File links Confederate_penny. ... Image File history File links Copyright (c) 2005 Peter Clericuzio. ... Image File history File links Copyright (c) 2005 Peter Clericuzio. ... A gold nugget A precious metal is a rare metallic chemical element of high economic value. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... The United States one-cent coin, commonly called a penny, is a unit of currency equaling one-hundredth of a United States dollar. ... The original Liberty nickel design indicated the denomination only with a large Roman numeral V. The Liberty Head nickel, sometimes referred to as the V nickel due to its reverse design, was an American nickel five-cent piece. ... The term obverse, and its opposite, reverse, describe the two sides of units of currency and many other kinds of two-sided objects, most often in reference to coins, but also to medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art. ... General Name, Symbol, Number nickel, Ni, 28 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 10, 4, d Appearance lustrous, metallic and silvery with a gold tinge Atomic mass 58. ... A die is a tool used in the manufacturing industry to create a wide variety of products and components. ...


Unknown until 1879, the Confederacy did strike a half dollar at the New Orleans Mint. Only 504 coins are known to have been made; 500 of those were sold, the reverses smoothed down and restruck with the Confederate die. Those are known as restrikes. Four originals, minted on a hand press, were used as test specimens and distributed to government officials for approval. 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Half Dollar of the United States has been produced nearly every year since the inception of the United States Mint in 1794. ... A postcard dated July 12, 1907 showing the New Orleans Mint during its last few years of operation as a branch mint facility The Ionic portico of the façade of the New Orleans Mint today, as seen from across Esplanade Avenue. ... The term obverse, and its opposite, reverse, describe the two sides of units of currency and many other kinds of two-sided objects, most often in reference to coins, but also to medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art. ... A mint is a facility which manufactures coins for currency. ...


See also

The Confederate States of America had an agrarian-based economy that relied heavily on slavery plantations for the production of cotton for export to Europe and the northern US states. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...

References

  • A Guide Book of United States Coins by: R.S. Yeoman ISBN 0-7948-1790-4
  • 2005 Blackbook Price Guide to United States Paper Money ISBN 1-4000-4839-7

External links

  • Currency issued by States of the Confederacy
  • The Story of Confederate Currency

 
 

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