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Encyclopedia > Condottieri

Condottieri (singular condottiere (in English) or condottiero (in Italian)) were mercenary leaders employed by Italian city-states from the late Middle Ages until the mid-sixteenth century. The word means "contractor" in renaissance Italian. A mercenary, is a person who takes part in an armed conflict and is motivated to take part in the hostilities essentially by the desire for private gain and, in fact, is promised, by or on behalf of a Party to the conflict, material compensation substantially in excess of that... A city-state is a region controlled exclusively by a city. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ...

Leonardo da Vinci's Il Condottiero, 1480.

Contents

Image File history File links Il_Condottiere. ... Image File history File links Il_Condottiere. ... The Mona Lisa Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519) was an Italian polymath: scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, painter, sculptor, architect, musician, and writer. ...

History

In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries Italian city-states were becoming enriched by their trade with the Orient. These cities, such as Venice, Florence, and Genoa, had woefully small armies and were increasingly becoming targets of attack by foreign powers as well as envious neighbours. The noblemen ruling the cities soon resorted to hiring companies of mercenaries known as condotta ("contract") to defend their territories. Each condotta was led by a condottiere, a term which soon became synonymous with "captain". (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... A city-state is a region controlled exclusively by a city. ... The Levant The Levant (IPA: /ləvænt/) is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia) is the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,663 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... Genoa (Genova [] in Italian - Zena [] in Genoese) is a city and a seaport in northern Italy, the capital of the Province of Genoa and of the region of Liguria. ...


The very first of these bands (called in contemporary Italy masnada, plural masnade) appeared between the end of the thirteenth and the beginning of fourteenth centuries and were not of Italian origin. Soldiers came mainly from Germany, Brabant (brabanzoni), Aragon and Catalonia: the last, for example, had come to Italy following King Peter III of Aragon in the October 1282 and had remained there afterward searching for employers. Other mercenaries came in 1333 alongside John of Bohemia, and therefore served Perugia in his war against Arezzo with the name Compagnia della Colomba ("Dove Company"). Some of these masnade were merely a grouping of bandits and other desperate men. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Brabant is a former duchy in the Low Countries, and a former province of Belgium. ... Capital Zaragoza Official language(s) Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 4th  47,719 km²  9. ... Anthem: Capital Barcelona Official language(s) Catalan,Spanish and Aranese. ... Peter III of Aragon (Catalan: Pere) (1239 – November 11, 1285, also Peter I of Valencia, Peter II of Barcelona), known as the Great, was the king of Aragon and Valencia and count of Barcelona from 1276 to 1285. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Events End of the Kamakura period and beginning of the Kemmu restoration in Japan. ... John the Blind of Luxemburg (August 10, 1296 - August 26, 1346) was King of Bohemia and Count of Luxemburg. ... Location of Perugia in Italy Coordinates: Country Italy Region Umbria Province Province of Perugia Government  - Mayor Renato Locchi Area  - City 449 km²  (1,165 sq mi) Elevation 493 m (1,617. ... Arezzo (Latin Arretium) is an old city in central Italy, capital of the province of the same name, located in Tuscany. ...

A 17th century Condottiero , by Artemisia Gentileschi.
A 17th century Condottiero , by Artemisia Gentileschi.

Later these bands were joined by the first true organized Ventura Companies, those of Duke Werner of Urslingen and count Konrad von Landau. The Italian noble Lodrisio Visconti countered by creating the "Company of St. George". Werner's company differed from the previous ones by a code of laws which imposed a rigid discipline and an equal division of income. This company was increased until it turned into the fearsome "Great Company", which had up to 3,000 barbute, each barbuta including a knight and a sergeant. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (650x1064, 93 KB) // Artemisia Gentileschi Portrait of a Condottiero 1622 Oil on canvas 208 x 128 cm Palazzo dAccursio, Bologna, Italy Accessed online from: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (650x1064, 93 KB) // Artemisia Gentileschi Portrait of a Condottiero 1622 Oil on canvas 208 x 128 cm Palazzo dAccursio, Bologna, Italy Accessed online from: http://www. ... Self-portrait (1630s) Artemisia Gentileschi (July 8, 1593 - 1653) was an Italian Early Baroque painter, today considered one of the most accomplished painters in the generation influenced by Caravaggio (Caravaggisti). ... Lodrisio Visconti (c. ...


The bands of condottieri became notorious for their caprice. They would often change sides to a higher paying rival before or even during battle. They soon realized that they held a monopoly on military power in Italy and began dictating terms to their ostensible employers. Many, such as Braccio da Montone and Muzio Sforza, became powerful political figures in the fourteenth century. The condottieri also became reluctant to place themselves or their men in harm's way and began fighting each other in grandiose but often pointless and nearly bloodless "battles". They still retained grand armored knights and medieval weapons and tactics long after the rest of Europe had converted to more modern armies composed of pikemen and musketeers. Braccio da Montone, byname of Andrea Fortebracci (July 1, 1368 - June 1424) was an Italian condottiero. ... Muzio Attendolo Sforza. ... A pike is a pole weapon once used extensively by infantry principally as a counter-measure against cavalry assaults. ... For other uses of this term, see Musketeer (disambiguation). ...


Cola di Rienzo had Werner executed in Rome in 1347, and Landau took over the Great Company. Landau, betrayed by his Hungarian soldiers, was defeated in 1362 by Albert Sterz and John Hawkwood's "White Company", which used more advanced combat tactics and formations. The barbuta was replaced by the lancia comprising three men: a capo-lancia and groom, both mounting a battle horse, plus a boy using a lesser quality horse. Five lance formed a posta, five poste a bandiera ("flag"). Now as many the condottieri comprised as many Italian companies as foreign, creating soon a host of national companies: they included the Astorre I Manfredi's Compagnia della Stella ("Star's company"), a new Company of St. George under Ambrogio Visconti, Niccolò da Montefeltro's Compagnia del Cappelletto ("Little Hat Company"), and Giovanni da Buscareto and Bartolomeo Gonzaga's Compagnia della Rosa, the last using a name of its own. Cola di Rienzi (c. ... Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411). ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1357 1358 1359 1360 1361 - 1362 - 1363 1364 1365 1366 1367 See also: 1362 state leaders Events Under Edward III, English replaces French as Englands national language, for the... Sir John Hawkwood (1320-1394) was an English mercenary or condottiere in the 14th century Italy. ... Astorre Manfredi (c. ...


From the 15th century onward the companies' leaders were mainly Italian: they were nobles who for some reason had not been able to succeed in their lands and had therefore chosen the fighting life. In that century, the most famous condottiero was Giovanni dalle Bande Nere from Forlì, son of Caterina Sforza. He also known as "the last condottiero" (but that means "the last famous condottiero"). His son was Cosimo I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Portrait of Giovanni by Gian Paolo Pace, now housed in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. ... Forlì is a comune and city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, famed as the birthplace of the great painter Melozzo da Forlì and of Fascist leader Benito Mussolini, at the nearby comune of Predappio. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Cosimo I de Medici in Armour by Agnolo Bronzino Cosimo I de Medici (June 12, 1519, Florence [1] – April 21, 1574, Castello) was the first Grand Duke of Tuscany, ruling from 1537 to 1574, during the waning days of the Renaissance. ...


Sometimes even princes fought for some periods as condottieri in order to increase their revenues: the most notable cases are Sigismondo Malatesta, lord of Rimini, and Federico da Montefeltro, duke of Urbino. Incomes were high indeed, though it should be noted that inflation was high in Italy during the period: Sigismondo Malatesta (November 1498 - December 1553) was an Italian condottiero. ... Rimini is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and capital city of the Province of Rimini. ... Fedrico da Montefeltro painted by Piero della Francesca Federico da Montefeltro (1422–1482) was one of the most successful condottieri of the Italian Renaissance, a fighter for hire who created one of the great libraries, perhaps the largest of Italy after the Vatican, with his own team of scribes in... Panorama of Urbino with the cathedral and the palazzo ducale Urbino is a city in the Marche in Italy, southwest of Pesaro, a World Heritage Site with a great cultural history during the Renaissance as the seat of Federico da Montefeltro. ...

The leaders of these new condottieri companies were not chosen by their men, but viceversa. The condotta become a consolidated form of contract. When the contract period (ferma) ceased, the company must wait another period called aspetto ("wait") in which the State kept the possibility of renewing it. If the contract ended in a definitive way, the condottiero could not declare war upon the other contracting party before two years had passed. Florin may refer to this modern currency: Aruban florin. ... Events June 1 - Battle of San Romano - Florence defeats Siena foundation of Université de Caen In the end of the Hook and Cod wars, Jacqueline, Countess of Hainaut and Holland is forced by Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, to abdicate all her estates in his favour; end of Hainaut... The decisive attack of Micheletto Attendolo at San Romano, part of The Battle of San Romano triptych by Paolo Uccello. ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... Events January 5/ 6 - Christopher of Bavaria, King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden dies with no designated heir leaving all three kingdoms with vacant thrones. ... William VIII Palaiologos (July 19, 1420 - February 27, 1483) was the Marquess of Montferrat from 1464 until his death. ... Portrait of Francesco Sforza, ca 1460, by Bonifazio Bembo: Sforza insisted on being shown in his worn dirty old campaigning hat. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... The scudo was a coin used in Italy in past times, whose name derives from the French golden écu, created during the reign of Louis IX. From the 18th century, the name was used in Italy for large silver coins sporting the sovereigns insignas. ... 1505 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Portrait of Francesco II Gonzaga in the Uffizi, Florence. ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... Francesco Maria della Rovere may refer to the following members of the Della Rovere dynasty: Francesco Maria I della Rovere, duke of Urbino Francesco Maria II della Rovere, duke of Urbino Category: ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ...


The condotta was also applied for sea mercenaries. This was called contratto d'assento, and assentisti were the captains and venturers hired in this way. These were mainly used by Genoa and the Papal States from the 14th century. Venice instead considered it a humiliating way to hire sailors and never used it, even in the most dangerous periods of her history. Genoa (Genova [] in Italian - Zena [] in Genoese) is a city and a seaport in northern Italy, the capital of the Province of Genoa and of the region of Liguria. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia) is the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,663 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ...


The condottieri were masters of the battles fought in Italy for the whole 15th century. By the time of the wars in Lombardy, Niccolò Machiavelli observed, "None of the principal states were armed with their own proper forces": (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... The wars in Lombardy between Venice and Milan, lasted from 1425 to the signing of the Treaty of Lodi in 1454. ... Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli (May 3, 1469 – June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher, musician, poet, and romantic comedic playwright. ...

Thus the arms of Italy were either in the hands of the lesser princes, or of men who possessed no state; for the minor princes did not adopt the practice of arms from any desire of glory, but for the acquisition of either property or safety. The others (those who possessed no state) being bred to arms from their infancy, were acquainted with no other art, and pursued war for emolument, or to confer honor upon themselves.
History I.vii.

Throughout the 15th century Italian armies had defeated most, though not all, incursions by hostile neighbors, be they French, Swiss, German, Austrian, Hungarian or Turkish. At Calliano in 1487 the Venetians met, and more than held their own against, German landsknechte and Swiss infantry, troops who were then regarded as the best in Europe. Calliano may refer to: Calliano (AT), a town in Italy Calliano (TN), a town in Italy Category: ... Venice is known for its waterways and gondolas Gondola. ... Landsknechts (German, Land land, country + Knecht servant: i. ...


As time passed, the financial interests and the increasing political role the captains were playing led to some serious drawbacks: often the condottieri behaved treacherously and tended to solve the clashes by bribing or asking for bribes themselves instead of combat. The condotta being such a lucrative activity, the contenders had little interest to risk their army in a bloody clash: if a pitched battle was unavoidable, they tended to avoid heavy losses and leave the field preserving as much as possible of the army.


The end of the condottieri age began in 1494 with the first great foreign invasion in more than a century: Charles VIII's national French army proved quite a match for the divided Italian states and smaller condottieri armies. Some of the most renowned condottieri chose therefore to fight for foreign powers: Gian Giacomo Trivulzio, for example, abandoned Milan for France, while Andrea Doria became admiral of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles. In the end however the failure was political rather then military, and stemmed from a disunity and a lack of political determination. 1494 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles VIII the Affable (French: Charles VIII lAffable) (June 30, 1470 – April 7, 1498) was King of France from 1483 to his death. ... The French Army (French: Armée de Terre) is the land-based component of the French Armed Forces. ... Gian Giacomo Trivulzio (1441-1518) was a Milanese aristocrat who held several military commands during the Italian Wars. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Andrea Doria or DOria (November 30, 1466-November 25, 1560) was a Genoese condottiero and admiral. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Charles V (24 February 1500 – 21 September 1558) was ruler of the Burgundian Netherlands (1506-1555), King of Spain (1516-1556), King of Naples and Sicily (1516-1554), Archduke of Austria (1519-1521), King of the Romans (or German King), (1519-1556 but did not formally abdicate until 1558) and...


The condotta had disappeared by 1550. The term condottiero remained to indicate great Italian generals mainly fighting for foreign states. Figures like Marcantonio II Colonna and Raimondo Montecuccoli were prominent well into the sixteenth and the seventeenth centuries. Events February 7 - Julius III becomes Pope. ... For other uses, see Marcantonio Colonna (disambiguation). ... Raimondo, Count of Montecuccoli or Montecucculi (born February 21, 1608 or 1609 at the castle of Montecucculo in Modena; died October 16, 1680 at Linz) was prince of the holy Roman Empire and Neapolitan duke of Melfi, Austrian general. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


Famous condottieri

Main article: List of condottieri
Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta, lord of Rimini, by Piero della Francesca.
Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta, lord of Rimini, by Piero della Francesca.

Condottieri (singular condottiero) were mercenary leaders employed by Italian city-states from the late Middle Ages until the mid-sixteenth century. ... Sigismondo Malatesta, lord of Rimini, by Piero della Francesca (Louvre) Source: http://www. ... Sigismondo Malatesta, lord of Rimini, by Piero della Francesca (Louvre) Source: http://www. ... The Baptism of Christ, 1450 (National Gallery, London). ... Roger de Flor, also known as Rutger von Blum (1266 in Brindisi - April 4, 1306 in Adrianople), a military adventurer of the 13th and 14th century, was the second son of a German falconer named Richard Blum (Blum means flower in German) in the service of the Holy Roman Emperor... Malatesta da Verucchio (1212 - 1312) was the founder of the powerful Malatesta family and a famous condottiere. ... An ancient portrait of Castruccio Castracani. ... Lucca is a city in Tuscany, northern central Italy, situated on the river Serchio in a fertile plain near (but not on) the Ligurian Sea. ... Walter VI of Brienne (c. ... Cangrande (christened Can Francesco) della Scala (March 9, 1291 – July 22, 1329) was an Italian seignor and condottieri, the most celebrated of the of the della Scala family (also known as the Scaligeri, Scaliger or de Scalis) which ruled Verona from 1277 until 1387. ... Sir John Hawkwood (1320-1394) was an English mercenary or condottiere in the 14th century Italy. ... Giovanni Ordelaffi (Forlì, 1355-1399) was a member of the noble family of Ordelaffi, the Lords of Forlì, in Italy, in the XIV century and in the XV century. ... Forlì is a comune and city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, famed as the birthplace of the great painter Melozzo da Forlì and of Fascist leader Benito Mussolini, at the nearby comune of Predappio. ... Events January 7 - Portuguese king Afonso IV sends three men to kill Ines de Castro, beloved of his son prince Pedro - Pedro revolts and incites a civil war. ... Events September 30 - Accession of Henry IV of England October 13 - Coronation of Henry IV of England November 1 - Accession of John VI, Duke of Brittany Births William Canynge, English merchant (approximate date; died 1474) Zara Yaqob, Emperor of Ethiopia (died 1468) Deaths January 4 - Nicolau Aymerich, Catalan theologian and... Facino Cane da Casale, born Bonifacio Cane (1360 - May 1412) was an Italian condottiero. ... Braccio da Montone, byname of Andrea Fortebracci (July 1, 1368 - June 1424) was an Italian condottiero. ... Alberico da Barbiano (c. ... Muzio Attendolo Sforza. ... Sforza was a ruling family of Renaissance Italy, based in Milan. ... Giovanni Maria Vitelleschi (born at Corneto Tarquinia - died at Rome, April 1 or 2, 1440), the fighting bishop of Recanati (from 1431), afterwards made a cardinal, was the condottiere-bishop who was commander of the papal armies of Pope Eugenius IV when the Colonna faction at Rome, infuriated by the... Erasmo of Narni (1370 - 1443), better known as Gattamelata, was was among the most famous of the condottieri or mercenaries in the Italian Renaissance. ... Portrait Niccolò Piccinino (1386 - 1444), Italian condottiere, born at Perugia, was the son of a butcher. ... Francesco Bussone, often called Count of Carmagnola[1] (c. ... The decisive attack of Micheletto Attendolo at San Romano, part of The Battle of San Romano triptych by Paolo Uccello. ... Portrait of Francesco Sforza, ca 1460, by Bonifazio Bembo: Sforza insisted on being shown in his worn dirty old campaigning hat. ... Sigismondo Malatesta (November 1498 - December 1553) was an Italian condottiero. ... Bartolomeo Colleoni (1400-1475), Italian condottiere (soldier of fortune), was born at Bergamo. ... Fedrico da Montefeltro painted by Piero della Francesca. ... Cesare Borgia. ... Niccolò di Pitigliano (Niccolò di Aldobrandino de Orsini, Count-Palatine of Pitigliano and Soana, Lord of Fiano, Morlupo and Filacciano, Count of Nola, Lord of Avella, Boiano, Ottaiano, Cicala, Palma di Campagnia and Montefortino Irpino, Ghedi with Leno, Castelletto, Malpaga and Montirone) was an Itlian Condottiere best known as the... Bartolomeo dAlviano (1455-1515) was an eminent Venetian general and captain who distinguished himself in the defence of the republic against the Emperor Maximilian. ... Gian Giacomo Trivulzio (1441-1518) was a Milanese aristocrat who held several military commands during the Italian Wars. ... Portrait of Giovanni by Gian Paolo Pace, now housed in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. ... Ferrante I Gonzaga (Italian: Ferdinando I, January 28, 1507 - November 15, 1557) was an Italian condottiero, a member of the House of Gonzaga and the first of the branch of the Gonzaga of Guastalla. ... Astorre Manfredi (c. ...

Main battles of condottieri

For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Guido da Montefeltro (1223 - September 29, 1298) was an Italian military strategist and lord of Urbino. ... Forlì is a comune and city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, famed as the birthplace of the great painter Melozzo da Forlì and of Fascist leader Benito Mussolini, at the nearby comune of Predappio. ... The Battle of Montecatini was fought on August 29, 1315 between the city of Pisa, and the forces of both Naples and Florence. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Combatants Compagnia di San Giorgio Milan Commanders Lodrisio Visconti Werner von Urslingen Konrad von Landau Luchino Visconti Ettore da Panigo Casualties c. ... Events Emperor Go-Murakami ascends to the throne of Japan Kashmir is conquered by the muslims Births July 23 - King Louis I of Naples (d. ... Lodrisio Visconti (c. ... Verona is a city and provincial capital in Veneto, Northern Italy. ... Luchino Visconti. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... // Events January 17 – Pope Gregory XI enters Rome. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Rennes Regional President Jean-Yves Le Drian (PS) (since 2004) Departments Côtes-dArmor Ille-et-Vilaine Morbihan Finistère Arrondissements 15 Cantons 201 Communes 1,268 Statistics Land area1 27,208 km² Population (Ranked 7th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Sir John Hawkwood (1320-1394) was an English mercenary or condottiere in the 14th century Italy. ... Cesena (ancient Caesena) is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy, south of Ravenna and west of Rimini, on the Savio River, co-chief of the Province of Forlì-Cesena. ... The Battle of Castagnaro was fought on March 11, 1387 at Castagnaro (todays Veneto, northern Italy) between Verona and Padua. ... Events June 2 - John Holland, a maternal half-brother of Richard II of England, is created Earl of Huntingdon. ... Giovanni Ordelaffi (Forlì, 1355-1399) was a member of the noble family of Ordelaffi, the Lords of Forlì, in Italy, in the XIV century and in the XV century. ... Sir John Hawkwood (1320-1394) was an English mercenary or condottiere in the 14th century Italy. ... Tronco Maestro Riviera: a pedestrian walk along a section of the inland waterway or naviglio interno of Padua The city of Padua (Lat. ... July 18 - Battle of the Kondurcha River - Timur defeats Tokhtamysh in the Volga. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... The Battle of Casalecchio took place on June 26, 1402 near the town of Casalecchio di Reno, near Bologna. ... Events September 14 - Battle of Homildon Hill. ... Alberico da Barbiano (c. ... Muzio Attendolo Sforza Muzio Attendolo Sforza (Cotignola, May 28, 1369-Perugia January 4, 1424) was an Italian condottieri of the 14th century. ... May 30 - The Catholic Church burns Jerome of Prague as a heretic. ... Braccio da Montone, byname of Andrea Fortebracci (July 1, 1368 - June 1424) was an Italian condottiero. ... Carlo I Malatesta (June 1368 - 13 September 1429) was an Italian condottiero and lord of Rimini, Fano, Cesena and Pesaro. ... Location of Perugia in Italy Coordinates: Country Italy Region Umbria Province Province of Perugia Government  - Mayor Renato Locchi Area  - City 449 km²  (1,165 sq mi) Elevation 493 m (1,617. ... Combatants Venice Milan Commanders Francesco Bussone da Carmagnola Carlo Malatesta Casualties Unknown 8,000 Milanese taken prisoner including Malatesta The Battle of Maclodio was fought on 11 October 1427, resulting in a victory for the Venetians under Carmagnola over the Milanese under Carlo I Malatesta. ... Events Lincoln College, a constituent college of the University of Oxford, is founded. ... Francesco Bussone, often called Count of Carmagnola[1] (c. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia) is the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,663 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... Carlo I Malatesta (June 1368 - 13 September 1429) was an Italian condottiero and lord of Rimini, Fano, Cesena and Pesaro. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... The battle of San Romano was fought in 1432 between the troops of Florence and Siena. ... Events June 1 - Battle of San Romano - Florence defeats Siena foundation of Université de Caen In the end of the Hook and Cod wars, Jacqueline, Countess of Hainaut and Holland is forced by Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, to abdicate all her estates in his favour; end of Hainaut... Niccolò da Tolentino portrayed in the Battle of San Romano by Paolo Uccello. ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... Piazza del Campo Siena is a city in Tuscany, Italy. ... The Battle of Anghiari was suck you a battle fought on June 29, 1440, between Milan and the Italian League led by Republic of Florence in the course of the Wars in Lombardy. ... For alternative meanings, see number 1440. ... Portrait Niccolò Piccinino (1386 - 1444), Italian condottiere, born at Perugia, was the son of a butcher. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia) is the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,663 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... The decisive attack of Micheletto Attendolo at San Romano, part of The Battle of San Romano triptych by Paolo Uccello. ... The Battle of Fornovo took place in July 1495 during the Italian Wars. ... 1495 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles VIII the Affable (French: Charles VIII lAffable) (June 30, 1470 – April 7, 1498) was King of France from 1483 to his death. ... The Battle of Agnadello was the one of the more significant battles of the War of the League of Cambrai, and one of the major battles of the Italian Wars. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bartolomeo dAlviano (1455-1515) was an eminent Venetian general and captain who distinguished himself in the defence of the republic against the Emperor Maximilian. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia) is the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,663 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... Combatants France Holy Roman Empire, Spain, Duchy of Milan[1] Commanders Francis I of France Charles de Lannoy, Antonio de Leyva, Georg Frundsberg Strength 17,000 infantry 6,500 cavalry 53 guns 19,000 infantry 4,000 cavalry 17 guns Casualties 12,000 dead or wounded 500 dead or wounded... Events January 21 - The Swiss Anabaptist Movement was born when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptized each other in the home of Manzs mother on Neustadt-Gasse, Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union. ... The Battle of Marciano occurred in the countryside of Marciano, August 2nd, 1554. ... Events April 11 - Battle of Ceresole - French forces under the Comte dEnghien defeat Imperial forces under the Marques Del Vasto near Turin. ... Categories: Pages needing attention | Stub | Medici ... Piero Strozzi as Marshal of France. ...

Sources

  • (1844-1845) Storia delle compagnie di ventura in Italia, 4 vols.. 
  • Mallett, Michael (1974). Mercenaries and their Masters: Warfare in Renaissance Italy. Rowman and Littlefield. 
  • Rendina, Claudio (1992). I Capitani di ventura. Newton Compton. 
  • Machiavelli, Niccolò. History of Florence. (on-line text)

Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli (May 3, 1469 – June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher, musician, poet, and romantic comedic playwright. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Condottieri and the Great Equestrian Statues and Paintings of Renaissance Italy (2278 words)
"A condottiere (plural condottieri) was the holder of a military condotta (plural condotte), or contract, for the raising and leadership of troops.
While condotte were being issued by Italian cities and states as early as the second half of the twelve hundreds as a means of recruiting a part of their armies, it was only in the later years of the thirteen hundreds that........
The nuclei of the companies which condottieri contracted to provide were normally kept permanently in being and augmented for specific contracts and campaigns by recruitment of additional rank and file.
Condottieri - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1537 words)
Condottieri (singular condottiere) were mercenary leaders employed by Italian city-states from the late Middle Ages until the mid-sixteenth century.
The condottieri were masters of the battles fought in Italy for the whole 15th century.
The lavishly adorned but ineffective condottieri were increasingly powerless against the armies of the nations of Western Europe that flooded into Italy in the 16th century, during the Italian Wars.
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