FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Condominium" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Condominium
Property law
Part of the common law series
Acquisition of property
Gift  · Adverse possession  · Deed
Lost, mislaid, or abandoned
Alienation  · Bailment  · License
Estates in land
Allodial title  · Fee simple  · Fee tail
Life estate  · Defeasible estate
Future interest  · Concurrent estate
Leasehold estate  · Condominiums
Conveyancing of interests in land
Bona fide purchaser
Torrens title  · Strata title
Estoppel by deed  · Quitclaim deed
Mortgage  · Equitable conversion
Action to quiet title
Limiting control over future use
Restraint on alienation
Rule against perpetuities
Rule in Shelley's Case
Doctrine of worthier title
Nonpossessory interest in land
Easement  · Profit
Covenant running with the land
Equitable servitude
Related topics
Fixtures  · Waste  · Partition
Riparian water rights
Lateral and subjacent support
Assignment  · Nemo dat
Other areas of the common law
Contract law  · Tort law
Wills and trusts
Criminal Law  · Evidence

A condominium, or condo, is a form of housing tenure. It is the legal term used in the United States and in most provinces of Canada. In Australia and the Canadian province of British Columbia it is referred to as strata title. Quebec knows it as syndicates of co-ownership. In England and Wales the equivalent is commonhold, a form of ownership introduced in 2004 and at this time is uncommon. Colloquially, the term "condo" is often used to refer to the unit itself in place of the word "apartment". Technically, the condominium is the whole collection of individual home units along with the land upon which they sit. Individual home ownership is composed of only of the air-space within the boundaries of the home, as defined by a document known as a Declaration, filed of record with the local governing authority. Typically these boundaries will include the drywall surrounding a room, allowing the homeowner to make some interior modifications without impacting the common area. Anything outside this boundary is held in an undivided ownership interest by a corporation established at the time of the condominium’s creation. The corporation holds this property in trust on behalf of the homeowners as a group–-it does not have ownership itself. Big cities, including Chicago, New York City, Los Angeles, Miami, Vancouver, and Toronto, are major condo users. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... Strata Title is a form of ownership devised for multi-level apartment blocks, which have apartments at different levels or strata. Strata title was first introduced in New South Wales, Australia to better cope with apartment blocks. ... Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... Commonhold is a system of property ownership in England and Wales. ... In international law, a condominium is a territory in which two sovereign powers have equal rights. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... A gift, in the law of property, has a very specific meaning. ... In common law, adverse possession is the process by which title to anothers real property is acquired without compensation, by, as the name suggests, holding the property in a manner that conflicts with the true owners rights for a specified period of time. ... An English deed written on fine parchment or vellum with seal tag dated 1638. ... {{PropertyLaw}} In the [[common law]] of [[property]], personal belongings that have left the possession of their rightful owners without having directly entered the possession of another person are deemed to be lost, mislaid, or abandoned, depending on the circumstances under which they were found by the next party to come... Alienation, in property law, is the capacity for a piece of property or a property right to be sold or otherwise transferred from one party to another. ... Bailment describes a legal relationship where physical possession of personal property (chattels) is transferred from one person (the bailor) to another person (the bailee) who subsequently holds possession of the property. ... To licence or grant licence is to give permission. ... At common law, an estate is the totality of the legal rights, interests, entitlements and obligations attaching to property. ... Allodial title is a concept in some systems of property law. ... Fee simple, also known as fee simple absolute or allodial, is a term of art in common law. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... A life estate, is a term used in common law to describe the ownership of land for the duration of a persons life. ... A defeasible estate is created when a grantor transfers land conditionally. ... In property law and real estate, a future interest - is an interest that accompanies a defeasible estate. ... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... A leasehold estate is an ownership interest in land in which a lessee or a tenant holds real property by some form of title from a lessor or landlord. ... Conveyancing is the act of transferring the legal title in a property from one person to another. ... A bona fide purchaser (BFP)—or bona fide purchaser for value without notice (BFPFVWN)—in the law of real property, is an innocent party who purchases property for value, without notice of any other partys claim to the title of that property. ... Torrens title is a system of land title where a register of land holdings maintained by the state guarantees indefeasible title to those included in the register. ... Strata Title is a form of ownership devised for multi-level apartment blocks, which have apartments at different levels or strata. Strata title was first introduced in New South Wales, Australia to better cope with apartment blocks. ... Estoppel by deed is a doctrine in the law of real property that arises where a party conveys title to land that he does not own to a bona fide purchaser, and then acquires title to that land. ... A quitclaim deed is a term used in property law to describe a document by which a person (the grantor) disclaims any interest the grantor might have in a piece of real property, and passes that claim to another person (the grantee). ... This article is about the legal mechanism used to secure property in favor of a creditor. ... Equitable conversion is a doctrine of the law of real property under which a purchaser of real property becomes the equitable owner of title to the property at the time he/she signs a contract binding him/her to purchase the land at a later date. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... In property law and real estate, a future interest - is an interest that accompanies a defeasible estate. ... A restraint on alienation, in the law of real property, is a clause used in the conveyance of real property that seeks to prohibit the recipient from selling or otherwise transferring his interest in the property. ... The rule against perpetuities is a rule in property law which prohibits a contingent grant or will from vesting outside a certain period of time. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In the common law of England, the doctrine of worthier title was a legal doctrine that preferred taking title to real estate by descent over taking title by devise or by purchase. ... A nonpossessory interest in land is a term of the law of property to describe any of a category of rights held by one person to use land that is in the possession of another. ... An easement is the right to do something or the right to prevent something over the real property of another. ... A profit, in the law of real estate, is a nonpossessory interest in land similar to the better-known easement, which gives the holder the right to take natural resources such as petroleum, minerals, timber, and wild game from the land of another. ... A covenant running with the land, is a real covenant, in the law of real property. ... An equitable servitude is a term used in the law of real property to describe a nonpossessory interest in land that operates much like a covenant running with the land, requiring the landowner to maintain certain practices with respect to the land (e. ... In the law of real property, fixtures are anything that would otherwise be a chattel that have, by reason of incorporation or affixation, become permanently attached to the real property. ... Waste is a term used in the law of real property to describe a cause of action that can be brought in court to address a change in condition of real property brought about by a current tenant that damages or destroys the value of that property. ... A partition is a term used in the law of real property to describe the court-ordered division of a concurrent estate into separate portions representing the proportionate interests of the tenants. ... Riparian water rights (or simply riparian rights) is a system of allocating water among those who possess land about its source. ... Lateral and subjacent support, in the law of property, describes the right a landowner has to have that land physically supported in its natural state by both adjoining land and underground structures. ... An assignment is a term used with similar meanings in the law of contracts and in the law of real estate. ... Nemo dat quod non habet, literally meaning no one [can] give what they dont have is a legal rule, sometimes called the nemo dat rule that states that the purchase of a possession from someone who has no ownership right to it also denies the purchaser any ownership title. ... A contract is any promise or set of promises made by one party to another for the breach of which the law provides a remedy. ... In the common law, a tort is a civil wrong for which the law provides a remedy. ... In the common law, a will or testament is a document by which a person (the testator) regulates the rights of others over his property or family after death. ... The law of trusts and estates is generally considered the body of law which governs the management of personal affairs and the disposition of property of an individual in anticipation and the event of such persons incapacity or death, also known as the law of successions in civil law. ... The term criminal law, sometimes called penal law, refers to any of various bodies of rules in different jurisdictions whose common characteristic is the potential for unique and often severe impositions as punishment for failure to comply. ... The law of evidence governs the use of testimony (e. ... Housing tenure refers to the financial arrangements under which someone has the right to live in a house or apartment. ... This article is about law in society. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Strata Title is a form of ownership devised for multi-level apartment blocks, which have apartments at different levels or strata. Strata title was first introduced in New South Wales, Australia to better cope with apartment blocks. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Commonhold is a system of property ownership in England and Wales. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ...



The primary attraction to this type of ownership is the ability to obtain affordable housing in a highly desirable area that typically is beyond economic reach. Additionally, such properties benefit from having restrictions that maintain and enhance value, providing control over blight that plagues some neighborhoods.

Contents

Overview

Typically, a condominium consists of multi-unit dwellings (i.e., an apartment or a development) where each unit is individually owned and the common areas, such as hallways and recreational facilities, are jointly owned (usually as "tenants in common") by all the unit owners in the building. It is also possible for condominiums to consist of single family dwellings: so-called "detached condominiums" where homeowners do not maintain the exteriors of the dwellings, yards, etc. or "site condominiums" where the owner has more control and possible ownership (as in a "whole lot" or "lot line" condominium) over the exterior appearance. These structures are preferred by some planned neighborhoods and gated communities. This article is about the structure. ... In 1915, Robert E. Park and E. W. Burgess introduced the idea of neighborhood as an ecological concept with urban planning implications . ... Entrance to a guard-gated community (Paradise Village Grand Marina Villas, Nuevo Vallarta, Mexico). ...


A homeowners association, consisting of all the members, manages the condominium through a board of directors elected by the membership. The same concept exists under different names depending on the jurisdiction, such as "unit title", "sectional title", "commonhold," "strata council," or "tenant-owner's association", "body corporate", "Owners Corporation", "condominium corporation" or "condominium association." Another variation of this concept is the "time share" although not all time shares are condominiums, and not all time shares involve actual ownership of (i.e., deeded title to) real property. Condominiums may be found in both civil law and common law legal systems as it is purely a creation of statute. A homeowners association, (or, as they are known in the industry, community association[1]) is an organization comprised of all owners of units[2] in a common interest development, and is given authority to enforce the covenants, conditions, and restrictions and managing the common amenities of the development. ... Commonhold is a system of property ownership in England and Wales. ... Tenant-owners association (Swedish: Bostadsrättsförening) is a legal term used in Nordic countries (Sweden, Finland and Norway) for a type of joint ownership of property in which the whole property is commonly owned by all members by each having an individual stake. The requirement to be a... For other uses of civil law, see civil law. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... The Statute of Grand Duchy of Lithuania A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ...


The restrictions for condominium usage are established in a document commonly called a "Declaration of Condominium". Rules of governance are usually covered under a separate set of Bylaws. Finally, a set of Rules and Regulations providing specific details of restrictions and conduct are established by the Board and are more readily amendable than the Declaration or Bylaws. Typical rules include mandatory maintenance fees (perhaps collected monthly), pet restrictions, and color/design choices visible from the exterior of the units. Condominiums are usually owned in fee simple title, but can be owned in ways that other real estate can be owned, such as title held in trust. In some jurisdictions, such as Ontario, Canada or Hawaii USA, there are "leasehold condominiums" where the development is built on leased land. Fee simple, also known as fee simple absolute or allodial, is a term of art in common law. ... A title is a prefix or suffix added to a persons name to signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... This law-related article does not cite its references or sources. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


In general, condominium unit owners can rent their home to tenants, similar to renting out other real estate, although leasing rights may be subject to conditions or restrictions set forth in the declaration (such as a rental cap for the total number of units in a community that can be leased at one time) or otherwise as permitted by local law. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with rental agreement. ... A tenant (from the Latin tenere, to hold), in legal contexts, holds real property by some form of title from a landlord. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ...


Non-residential condominiums

Condominium ownership is also used, albeit less frequently, for non-residential land uses: offices, hotel rooms, retail shops, and group housing facilities (retirement homes or dormitories). The legal structure is the same, and many of the benefits are similar; for instance, a nonprofit corporation may face a lower tax liability in an office condominium than in an office rented from a taxable, for-profit company. However, the frequent turnover of commercial land uses in particular can make the inflexibility of condominium arrangements problematic.


United States

New luxury Aqua waterfront condos in Long Beach, California
New luxury Aqua waterfront condos in Long Beach, California
Hallway view in one of Chicago's condos
Hallway view in one of Chicago's condos

The first condominium law passed in the United States was in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico in 1958.[citation needed] English Common law tradition holds that real property ownership must involve land, whereas the French civil law tradition recognized condominium ownership as early as the 1804 Napoleonic Code; thus, it is notable that condominiums evolved in the United States via a Caribbean government with a hybrid common-civil legal system. In 1960, the first condominium in the Continental United States was built in Salt Lake City, Utah.[citation needed] Initially designed as a housing cooperative (Co-op), the Utah Condominium Act of 1960 made it possible for "Graystone Manor" (2730 S 1200 East) to be built as a condominium. The legal counsel for the project, Keith B. Romney is also credited with authoring the Utah Condominium act of 1960. Romney also played an advisory role in the creation of condominium legislation with every other legislature in the U.S. Business Week hailed Romney as the "Father of Condominiums".[citation needed] He soon after formed a partnership with Don W. Pihl called "Keith Romney Associates", which was widely recognized throughout the 1970's as America's preeminent condominium consulting firm. [1] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (960 × 720 pixel, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) View of new Aqua Towers, in Long Beach, California I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (960 × 720 pixel, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) View of new Aqua Towers, in Long Beach, California I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles County Government  - Mayor Bob Foster Area  - City  65. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 1446 KB) Konrad Kociszewski, http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 1446 KB) Konrad Kociszewski, http://www. ... Hall is a term often used to refer to several different types of room in a house or a building. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Spanish: Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico) is a self-governing unincorporated organized territory of the United States located east of the Dominican Republic in the northeastern Caribbean. ... First page of the 1804 original edition. ... West Indies redirects here. ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ...


Although often mistakenly credited with coining the term "condominium", Romney has always been quick to point out that it harks back to Roman times, and that he merely borrowed it.[citation needed]


Nowadays, the leadership of the industry is dominated by Community Associations Institute or CAI.[citation needed] The Community Associations Institute (CAI) is an influential trade association and special interest group, dominated by lawyers and community managers,[1] that petitions for legislative beneficence for its members. ...


Section 234 of the 1961 National Housing Act allowed the Federal Housing Administration to insure mortgages on condominiums, leading to a vast increase in the funds available for condominiums, and to condominium laws in every state by 1969. Many Americans' first widespread awareness of condominium life came not from its largest cities but from south Florida, where developers had imported the condominium concept from Puerto Rico and used it to sell thousands of inexpensive homes to retirees arriving flush with cash from the urban Northern U.S.[citation needed] The Federal Housing Administration was begun as part of the New Deal in 1934. ... The FHAs logo The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) is a United States government agency created as part of the National Housing Act of 1934. ...


In recent years, the residential condominium industry has been booming in all of the major metropolitan areas such as Miami, Seattle, Boston, and New York. It is now in a slowdown phase.[citation needed] According to Richard Swerdlow, CEO of Condo.com, "You're not going to see this giant overbuild again. It's hard to imagine that you'd see in the next decade what we just saw. Real estate brokers and the developers were in almost a ticket-collecting mode. They were processing orders because there was so much business to go around. Now that sort of investor phenomenon has gone away." He added, "That phenomenon has stopped." Boston redirects here. ...


An alternative form of ownership, popular in the United States but found also in other common law jurisdictions, is the "cooperative" corporation, also known as "company share" or "co-op", in which the building has an associated legal company and ownership of shares gives the right to a lease for residence of a unit. Another form is leasehold or ground rent in which a single landlord retains ownership of the land on which the building is constructed in which the lease renews in perpetuity or over a very long term such as in a civil law emphyteutic lease. Another form of civil law joint property ownership is undivided co-ownership where the owners own a percentage of the entire property but have exclusive possession of a specific part of the property and joint possession of other parts of the property; distinguished from joint tenancy with right of survivorship or a tenancy in common of common law. This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... This article or section should include material from Tenancy agreement A lease is a contract conveying from one person (the lessor) to another person (the lessee) the right to use and control some article of property for a specified period of time (the term), without conveying ownership, in exchange for... Leasehold is a form of property tenure where one party buys the right to occupy land or a building for a given length of time. ... A ground rent is a form of lease in which unimproved land is leased for a long term for purposes of improvement by the tenant. ... An Emphyteutic lease is a type of real estate contract specifying that the lessee must improve the property with construction. ... Co-tenancy or joint tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... Co-tenancy or joint tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ...


Ontario, Canada

In Ontario, condominiums are governed by the Condominium Act, 1998 with each development establishing a corporation to deal with day-to-day functions (maintenance, repairs, etc...). A board of directors is elected by the owners of units (or, in the case of a common elements condominium corporation, the owners of the common interest in the common elements) in the development on at least a yearly basis. A general meeting is held annually to deal with board elections and the appointment of an auditor (or waiving of audit). Other matters can also be dealt with at the Annual General Meeting, but special meetings of the owners can be called by the board and, in some cases, by the owners themselves, at any time.


In recent years the condo industry has been booming in Canada, with dozens of new condo towers being erected each year. Toronto is the epicentre of this boom, with 17,000 new units being sold in 2005, more than double second place Miami's 7,500 units.[1] For several years now that city's sky line has had a forest of cranes erecting new towers. Outside of Toronto, the most common forms of condominium have been townhomes rather than highrises, although that trend may be altered as limitations are placed on "Greenfields" (see Greenfield land) developments in those areas (in turn, forcing developers to expand upward rather than outward and to consider more condominium conversions instead of new housing). Particular growth areas are in Kitchener, Waterloo, and London. In fact, after Toronto, the Golden Horseshoe Chapter of the Canadian Condominium Institute is one of that organization's most thriving chapters.[2] Greenfield land is a term used to describe a piece of undeveloped land, either currently used for agriculture or just left to nature. ...


The Ontario Condominium Act, 1998 provides an effectively wide range of development options, including Standard, Phased, Vacant Land, Common Element and Leasehold condominiums. Certain existing condominiums can amalgamate, and existing properties can be converted to condominium (provided municipal requirements for the same are met). Accordingly, the expanded and expanding use of the condominium concept is permitting developers and municipalities to consider newer and more interesting forms of development to meet social needs.


On this issue, Ontario condominium lawyer Michael Clifton writes, "Condominium development has steadily increased in Ontario for several years. While condominiums typically represent attractive lifestyle and home-ownership alternatives for buyers, they also, importantly, introduce a new approach to community planning for home builders and municipal approval authorities in Ontario. ...[There are] opportunities for developers to be both creative and profitable in building, and municipalities more flexible and imaginative in planning and approving, developments that will become sustainable communities." (In, A Comment about Condominiums, Community Planning and Sustainability, Forum Magazine, Dec 06/Jan 07, p. 28.)


Both new construction and the resale housing market has been driven by increasing sales in the condominium segment which can include both high rise buildings and townhome complexes. Since buying or selling a condominium requires special expertise and knowledge, it has become important to use the services of a professional with experience in this area and many Realtors will now specialize in this housing segment. As a Realtor that specializes in condominium and townhome properties, June Smith points out that “you are not just buying a home, but buying into a community and a lifestyle. Important considerations when buying into this type of property and lifestyle include security, privacy, recreational facilities, outdoor space, noise levels, pet policies along with other rules and regulations, parking, storage, condominium management and financial status of the condominium corporation.”


India

Condominiums are more commonly known as "flats" in India. This type of housing is very common in big cities like Mumbai (Bombay) but not very popular in rural India. , Bombay redirects here. ...


See also

This article is about the structure. ... Car condos (also known as car condominiums) are individual, climate-controlled parking garages people can buy to store their exotic cars, motorcycles, boats and other items. ... Commonhold is a system of property ownership in England and Wales. ... Generally stated, a condo conversion is a process of entitling an income property or other lands currently held under one title to convert from sole ownership of the entire property (which often already is a multi unit property) into individual for sale units. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... Strata Title is a form of ownership devised for multi-level apartment blocks, which have apartments at different levels or strata. Strata title was first introduced in New South Wales, Australia to better cope with apartment blocks. ...

References

  1. ^ Condominium Development Guide (published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont)
  • Condominium Property Act - Alberta
  • Condominium Act - Ontario
  • Consumer Protection - Condos - Government of Ontario web site
  • Essential Issues For Realtors, in the Condominium Act 1998 CCI-Golden Horseshoe Chapter
  • A Planners' and Municipalities' Guide To The Condominium Act, 1998CCI-Golden Horseshoe Chapter
  • Robert H. Nelson, Private Neighborhoods and the Transformation of Local Government (Urban Institute Press, 2005)
  • Strata Property Act - British Columbia
  • Strata Property Regulation - British Columbia
  • Bare Land Strata Regulations - British Columbia
Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Condominium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (447 words)
It is possible, however, for condominiums to consist of single family dwellings: so-called "detached condominiums" where homeowners do not maintain the exteriors of the dwellings, yards, etc. or "site condominiums" where the owner has more control over the exterior appearance.
Condominiums may be found in both civil law and common law legal systems as it is purely a creation of statute.
Another form is leasehold or ground rent in which a single landlord retains ownership of the land on which the building is constructed in which the lease renews in perpetuity or over a very long term such as in a civil law emphyteutic lease.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m