FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Conde de Molina Carlos Maria Isidro de Borbon
Infante Carlos of Spain
Infante Carlos of Spain

Don Carlos María Isidro Benito de Borbón, Infante of Spain (1788-1855) was the second surviving son of King Charles IV of Spain and of his wife, Maria Louisa of Parma. As Carlos V he was the first of the Carlist claimants to the throne of Spain. He is often referred to simply as 'Don Carlos', but should not be confused with Carlos, son of King Philip II of Spain, after whom Verdi's opera is named. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Charles IV (November 11, 1748 - January 20, 1819) was King of Spain from December 14, 1788 until his abdication on March 19, 1808. ... Carlism is a traditionalist, legitimist political movement in Spain seeking, among other things, the establishment of a separate line of the Bourbon family on the Spanish throne. ... Don Carlos (July 8, 1545 – July 24, 1568), Prince of Asturias was the son of King Philip II of Spain by his first wife Maria Manuela, daughter of John III of Portugal. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Giuseppe Verdi, by Giovanni Boldini, 1886 (National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome). ...

Contents


Early life

Carlos was born on March 29, 1788, at the Palacio Real de Aranjuez. In 1808 Napoleon induced Carlos' father Charles IV and his older brother Ferdinand VII to renounce their rights to the throne of Spain. But Carlos who was heir presumptive to his brother refused to renounce his rights to the throne, which he considered to have been given to him by God. From 1808 until 1814 he and his brothers were prisoners of Napoleon at Valençay in France. 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Palacio Real de Aranjuez at night The Palacio Real de Aranjuez is a residence of the King of Spain, one of the Spanish royal sites. ... Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Chateau Valençay Valençay is a small town amd commune in the Indre département in the Loire Valley of France situated on a hillside overlooking the Nahon river. ...

Spanish Royalty
House of Bourbon

Philip V
Children
   Louis I
   Ferdinand VI
   Charles III
   Mariana Victoria, Queen of Portugal
   Philip, Duke of Parma
   Teresa, Dauphine of France
   Infante Louis
   Antonia, Queen of Sardinia
Louis I
Ferdinand VI
Charles III
Children
   Infanta Maria Josepha
   Maria Luisa, Holy Roman Empress
   Infante Felipe
   Charles IV
   Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies
   Infante Gabriel
   Infante Antonio
Grandchild of cadet line
   Infante Pedro Carlos
Charles IV
Children
   Charlotte, Queen of Portugal
   Infanta Maria Amelia
   Maria Luisa, Queen of Etruria, Duchess of Parma
   Ferdinand VII
   Carlos, Count of Molina
   Maria Isabella, Queen of the Two Sicilies
   Francis Paula, Duke of Cadiz
Grandchildren of cadet lines
   Infante Carlos, Count of Montemolin
   Juan, Count of Montizón
   Infante Fernando
   Francis, Duke of Cadiz, King Consort of Spain
   Henry, Duke of Sevilla
   Infanta Maria Cristina
   Amelia, Princess of Bavaria
Ferdinand VII
Children
   Isabella II
   Luisa Fernanda, Duchess of Montpensier
Isabella II
Children
   Infante Ferdinand
   Isabella, Princess of Asturias
   Infanta Maria Christina
   Alfonso XII
   Maria de la Paz, Princess of Bavaria
   Eulalia, Duchess of Galliera
Alfonso XII
Children
   Maria de las Mercedes, Princess of Asturias
   Teresa, Princess of Bavaria
   Alfonso XIII
   Infanta Maria de la Concepcion
   Infanta Maria del Pilar
   Infanta Maria de la Paz
   Infanta Marie Eulalia
   Infante Francis
Alfonso XIII
Children
   Alfonso, Prince of Asturias
   Jaime, Duke of Segovia
   Infanta Beatriz
   Infanta Maria Cristina
   Juan, Count of Barcelona
   Infante Gonzalo
Grandchildren
   Alfonso, Duke of Cadiz
   Gonzalo, Duke of Aquitaine
   Infanta Pilar
   Juan Carlos I
   Infanta Margarita
   Infante Alfonso
Great Grandchildren
   Luis, Duke of Anjou
Juan Carlos I
Children
   Elena, Duchess of Lugo
   Cristina, Duchess of Palma
   Felipe, Prince of Asturias
Grandchild
   Infanta Leonor
Edit

In 1814 Carlos and the rest of the Spanish royal family returned to Madrid. In September 1816 he married his niece Infanta Francisca of Portugal (1800-1834), daughter of King John VI of Portugal and Carlos' sister Carlota Joaquina. Francisca was also sister of the second wife of Carlos' brother Ferdinand VII. The couple had three sons: The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house. ... Image File history File links Escudo_de_España. ... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... King Louis of Spain ( August 25, 1707 - August 31, 1724) ruled less than one year between the time his father Philip V abdicated in his favor, and his death from smallpox, both in 1724. ... Ferdinand VI, (September 23, 1713 - August 10, 1759), king of Spain from 1746 until his death, second son of Philip V, founder of the Spanish Bourbon dynasty (as opposed to the French Bourbons), by his first marriage with Maria Louisa of Savoy, was born at Madrid on September 23 1713. ... Charles III of Spain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Marianne Victoria of Bourbon (March 31, 1718 – January 15, 1781) (in Portuguese Mariana Vitória, in Spanish Mariana Victoria) was the eldest daughter of Philip V of Spain and Elizabeth Farnese. ... Philip of Parma (March 15, 1720 - July 18, 1765) was duke of Parma from 1748 to 1765. ... may refer to: Infanta Maria Teresa of Spain, eldest daughter of Philip IV of Spain who married her first cousin Louis XIV of France Infanta Maria Teresa of Spain, daughter of Philip V of Spain who married her first cousins son Louis, dauphin de France, son and heir of... King Louis of Spain - Luis in Spanish (August 25, 1707 – August 31, 1724) was the eldest son of Philip V of Spain by his first Queen consort Maria Louisa of Savoy. ... Ferdinand VI, (September 23, 1713 - August 10, 1759), king of Spain from 1746 until his death, second son of Philip V, founder of the Spanish Bourbon dynasty (as opposed to the French Bourbons), by his first marriage with Maria Louisa of Savoy, was born at Madrid on September 23 1713. ... Charles III of Spain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Holy Roman Emperor Leopold II Leopold II (born Peter Leopold Joseph) (Vienna, May 5, 1747 – Vienna, March 1, 1792) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1790 to 1792 and Grand-duke of Tuscany. ... Charles IV (November 11, 1748 - January 20, 1819) was King of Spain from December 14, 1788 until his abdication on March 19, 1808. ... King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (January 12, 1751 - January 4, 1825). ... Mariana Vitória Josefa or Maria Ana Vitória Josefa (pron. ... Princesa dona Maria Teresa of Braganza (pron. ... Charles IV (November 11, 1748 - January 20, 1819) was King of Spain from December 14, 1788 until his abdication on March 19, 1808. ... Carlota Joaquina Teresa of Spain (25 April or 25 May 1775 - 6 January or 7 January 1830) was the eldest daughter of King Carlos IV of Spain (1748-1819) and his wife Maria Luisa of Parma (1751-1819). ... Ferdinand VII (October 14, 1784 - September 29, 1833) was King of Spain from 1813 to 1833. ... Infante Carlos of Spain Don Carlos María Isidro Benito de Borbón, Infante of Spain (1788-1855) was the second surviving son of King Charles IV of Spain and of his wife, Maria Louisa of Parma. ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ... Don Juan Carlos Maria Isidro de Borbón, Count of Montizón (French: Jean Charles Marie Isidore de Bourbon, comte de Montizón) (May 15, 1822 – November 21, 1887) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain from 1860 to 1887, and the Legitimist claimant to the throne of... Francis of Assisi of Bourbon ( In Spanish: Francisco de Asís de Borbón), consort of Queen Isabella II of Spain, born Aranjuez, Spain, 13 May 1822; died Épinay-sur-Seine, France, 17 April 1902), titularly King of Spain. ... Sebastian Gabriel de Borbon y de Braganza, Infante of Portugal and Spain, was a royal of the 19th century and progenitor of the ducal lines of Hernani, Ansola, Durcal and Marchena. ... Louis Ferdinand (German: Ludwig Ferdinand; Spanish: Luis Fernando) (1859-1949), was a Bavarian prince and Spanish infante. ... Ferdinand VII (October 14, 1784 - September 29, 1833) was King of Spain from 1813 to 1833. ... Isabella II (October 10, 1830 – April 10, 1904), Isabel II in Spanish, was queen of Spain. ... Infanta Doña María Luísa Fernanda of Spain (30 January 1832 - 2 February 1897) was Infanta of Spain and Duchess of Montpensier. ... Isabella II (October 10, 1830 – April 10, 1904), Isabel II in Spanish, was queen of Spain. ... Infanta dona Isabel, Princess of Asturias (1851–1931), was twice the recognized heir to the throne of Spain. ... Alfonso XII of Spain (November 28, 1857–November 25, 1885), was king of Spain, reigning from 1875 to 1885, after a coup détat restored the monarchy and ended the ephemeral First Spanish Republic. ... Louis Ferdinand (German: Ludwig Ferdinand; Spanish: Luis Fernando) (1859-1949), was a Bavarian prince and Spanish infante. ... Infanta Doña María Luísa Fernanda of Spain (30 January 1832 - 2 February 1897) was Infanta of Spain and Duchess of Montpensier. ... Alfonso XII of Spain (November 28, 1857–November 25, 1885), was king of Spain, reigning from 1875 to 1885, after a coup détat restored the monarchy and ended the ephemeral First Spanish Republic. ... Infanta Maria de las Mercedes of Spain (1880–1904), Princess of the Asturias, for all 24 years of her life the Heiress Presumptive of the Spanish royal crown, and for a period in 1885–1886, the extant Head of the State of Spain, was born as Doña María... Louis Ferdinand (German: Ludwig Ferdinand; Spanish: Luis Fernando) (1859-1949), was a Bavarian prince and Spanish infante. ... Alfonso XIII of Spain (May 17, 1886 – February 28, 1941), King of Spain, posthumous son of Alfonso XII of Spain, was proclaimed King at his birth. ... Alfonso XIII of Spain (May 17, 1886 – February 28, 1941), King of Spain, posthumous son of Alfonso XII of Spain, was proclaimed King at his birth. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jaime Luitpold Isabelino Enrique de Borbón y Battenberg, Infante of Spain, Duke of Segovia (June 23, 1908- March 20, 1975), was the second son of King Alfonso XIII of Spain and his wife Princess Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg. ... HRH Infante Don Juan of Spain, Count of Barcelona, Juan Carlos Teresa Silvestre Alfonso de Borbón y Battenberg (June 20, 1913 – April 1, 1993), was the fourth son and designated heir of King Alfonso XIII of Spain, the monarch replaced by the Second Spanish Republic, and father of King... Alfonso de Borbón y de Dampierre (French citizen as Alphonse de Bourbon) (1936–1989), also known as the Duke of Cádiz (as he was mostly called in Spain) and Duke of Anjou, was a pretender to the French throne. ... The Infanta Pilar,1 Duchess of Badajoz (Doña María del Pilar Alfonsa Juana Victoria Luisa Ignacia de Todos los Santos de Borbón y Borbón-Dos Sicilias) (born July 30, 1936) is the eldest daughter of Juan de Borbon, Count of Barcelona and Maria Mercedes de Borb... Juan Carlos I (Juan Carlos Alfonso Víctor María de Borbón y Borbón-Dos Sicilias; pron. ... The Infanta Margarita, Duchess of Hernani and Soria (Doña Margarita María de la Victoria Esperanza Jacoba Felicidad Perpetua de Todos los Santos de Borbón y Borbón-Dos Sicilias) (born March 6, 1939), is the youngest daughter of Juan de Borbón, Count of Barcelona and Maria... Don Luis Alfonso Gonzalo Víctor Emanuel Marco de Borbón y Martínez-Bordiú, Duke of Anjou (French citizen as Louis de Bourbon) is considered to be the head of the French Royal House by royalists who consider the renunciation of Philip V of Spain as invalid. ... Juan Carlos I (Juan Carlos Alfonso Víctor María de Borbón y Borbón-Dos Sicilias; pron. ... Elena of Spain The Infanta Elena, Duchess of Lugo (Elena María Isabel Dominica de los Silos de Borbón y de Grecia); (born December 20, 1963, in Madrid), is the eldest daughter of King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofía, and third in the line of succession to the... The Infanta Cristina, Duchess of Palma de Mallorca (Cristina Federica Victoria Antonia de la Santísima Trinidad de Borbón y de Grecia, born June 13, 1965), is the younger daughter of King Juan Carlos of Spain and Queen Sofía. ... Prince Felipe, Prince of Asturias (Don Felipe Juan Pablo Alfonso de Todos los Santos de Borbón y de Grecia or The Honorable [Sir] Philip John Paul Alphonse of All the Saints of Bourbon and of Greece or simply Philip Alponse Bourbon; born January 30, 1968), is the third child... The Infanta Leonor of Spain (Leonor de Todos los Santos de Borbón y Ortiz, in English: Eleanor), born 31 October 2005, in Madrid, is the first and only child of Felipe, the Prince of Asturias and his wife Princess Letizia, and thus second in the succession line to the... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Location Location of Madrid in Europe Coordinates : 40° 23’N , 3°43′0″W Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Villa de Madrid (Spanish) Spanish name Villa de Madrid Founded 9th century Postal code 28001-28080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 91 (Villa de... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... John VI (Portuguese João, pron. ... framed|Portugal thumb|Carlota Joaquina - Queen of Portugal and Brazil Carlota Joaquina Teresa of Spain (25 April or May 1775 - 6 or 7 January 1830) was the eldest daughter of King Carlos IV of Spain (1748-1819) and his wife Maria Luisa of Parma (1751-1819). ...

Apart from several formal offices, Carlos took no significant part in the government of Spain. Ferdinand VII had found it necessary to cooperate with the moderate liberals and to sign a constitution. Carlos, however, was known for his firm belief in the divine right of kings to govern absolutely, the rigid orthodoxy of his religious opinions, and the piety of his life. 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Juan, Conde de Montizon (May 15, 1822 - November 21, 1887) was the younger son of Infante Carlos of Spain. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


During the revolutionary troubles of 1820-1823 (the "liberal triennium") Carlos was threatened by the extreme radicals, but no attack was made on him. While there were certain conservatives in Spain who wanted to put Carlos on the throne immediately, Carlos himself was a firm believer in the legitimate succession and would never have taken up arms against his brother. 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Pragmatic Sanction of 1830

In May 1830 Ferdinand VII published the Pragmatic Sanction, allowing daughters to succeed to the Spanish throne as well as sons. This decree had originally been approved by the Cortes in 1789, but it had never been officially promulgated. Up until this point Carlos had been heir presumptive to his brother. On October 10, 1830, Ferdinand's wife gave birth to a daughter Isabella, who thereupon displaced her uncle in the line of succession. Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A pragmatic sanction is a sovereigns solemn decree on a matter of primary importance and has the force of fundamental law. ... The Cortes Generales (English: General Courts) is the Spanish legislature. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... An Heir Presumptive (capitalised) is the person provisionally scheduled to inherit a throne, peerage, or other hereditary honor, but whose position can be displaced by the birth of an Heir Apparent or of a new Heir Presumptive with a better claim to the throne. ... Isabella II (October 10, 1830 – April 10, 1904), Isabel II in Spanish, was queen of Spain. ...


The clerical party (called in Spanish 'apostólicos') continued to support the rights of Carlos to the throne. They considered the Pragmatic Sanction not only impractical but also illegal. They intrigued in favour of Carlos, but he himself would do no more than assert his rights in words. His wife and her sister, Maria Teresa (1793-1874), the princess of Beira, on the other hand, were actively engaged in intrigues with the apostólicos. 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Prince of Beira is a title in Portugal, normally given to the heirs to the throne. ...


In March 1833 Ferdinand 'authorised' Carlos to go to Portugal with his wife and sister-in-law. The 'authorisation' was in fact an order to remove Carlos from Spain and his adherents. 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


In April 1833 Ferdinand called upon Carlos to take an oath of allegiance to Isabella as Princess of Asturias, the title traditionally used by the heir to the throne. In respectful but firm terms, Carlos refused. He had no personal desire for the throne, but he was adamant that he could not renounce what he considered to be his God-given rights and responsibilities. 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... HRH The Prince of Asturias The title Prince of Asturias is given to the heir apparent to the Spanish throne, and the earlier kingdom of León. ...


Succession

Ferdinand VII died September 29, 1833. In Madrid his wife Cristina declared herself regent for her daughter Isabella. On October 1, Carlos issued a manifesto declaring his own accession to the throne as 'Charles V'. He informed the members of Cristina's government that they were confirmed in their posts, and proceeded to the Portuguese-Spanish border. There he was met by forces loyal to Cristina and Isabella who threatened to arrest him. Carlos remained in Portugal which itself was in a state of civil war between the adherents of Carlos' nephew and brother-in-law Miguel and his great-niece, Miguel's niece Maria II. In Spain there were various risings which developed into the First Carlist War. The Liberal Wars, the War of the Two Brothers or Miguelite War was a war between progressive constitutionalists and authoritarian absolutists confronting one another in a war of royal succession that lasted from 1828 to 1834 in Portugal. ... Miguel of Portugal (English: Michael), the Traditionalist (Port. ... Maria II da Glória, (pron. ... At the beginning of the 18th century, King Philip V of Spain promulgated the Salic Law, which declared illegal the inheritance of the Spanish crown by women. ...


When the Miguelite party was finally beaten in Portugal in 1834, Carlos escaped to England where the government offered to grant him an annual pension of 30,000 pounds if he would renounce his claims and never return to Spain or Portugal. Carlos refused absolutely. In July he passed over to France, where he was actively aided by the legitimist party. He soon joined his adherents at Elizondo in the western Pyrenees of Spain. In October 1834 his sister-in-law Cristina issued a decree depriving him of his rights as an Infante of Spain; this was confirmed by the Cortes in 1837. 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... Legitimists are those Royalists in France who believe that the King of France and Navarre must be chosen according to the simple application of the Salic Law. ... Central Pyrenees. ... In the Spanish and former Portuguese monarchies, Infante (masc. ... The Cortes Generales (English: General Courts) is the Spanish legislature. ... | Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Carlos remained in Spain for five years. During these years he accompanied his armies, without displaying any of the qualities of a general or even much personal courage. But he endured a good deal of hardship, and was often compelled to take to hiding in the hills. On these occasions he was often carried over difficult places on the back of a stout guide commonly known as the "royal jackass" (burro real).


The semblance of a court which Carlos maintained was torn by incessant personal intrigues. While some of his adherents supported him because they believed in his hereditary rights to the throne, others were more concerned to promote the special privileges of the Basque provinces. There were ongoing conflicts between Carlos' military staff and the clergy who exercised significant influence over him. Capital Vitoria-Gasteiz Official languages Basque and Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 14th  7 234 km²  1,4% Population  â€“ Total (2005)  â€“ % of Spain  â€“ Density Ranked 7th  2 124 846  4,9%  293,73/km² Demonym  â€“ English  â€“ Spanish  â€“ Basque  Basque  vasco/a euskal herritar, euskaldun GDP GDP/Cápita 30. ...


In the first few years of the war, there were several moments when victory was within Carlos' grasp. The last of these was the so-called Royal Expedition of the summer of 1837 when Carlos himself accompanied his army from Navarre to the outskirts of Madrid. Carlos hoped to enter the city without any significant bloodshed, but when it became clear that only a battle would win the city, Carlos vacillated. After several days Carlos himself decided to withdraw; his army melted away and was reduced to a third of its former strenth.


His first wife having died in England, Carlos married her elder sister, his own niece Maria Teresa of Portugal, Princess of Beira, in Biscay in October 1837. Princesa dona Maria Teresa of Braganza (pron. ... Vizcaya province Vizcaya (Basque Bizkaia) is a province of northern Spain, in the northwestern part of the autonomous community of the Basque Country. ... | Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


In June 1838 Carlos appointed Rafael Maroto as his commander-in-chief. In February 1839 Maroto had four Carlist generals shot and issued a proclamation criticizing Carlos' court. When Carlos removed him from office, Maroto marched to Tolosa where Carlos was living and made him a virtual prisoner. Maroto was re-appointed commander-in-chief, and his opponents in Carlos' court were dismissed. Maroto then began private negotiations with Cristina's commander-in-chief, and in August 1839 abandoned Carlos completely. | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Final Exile

In September 1839 Carlos left Spain for France where he was briefly imprisoned. For almost another year, however, some of his commanders continued to fight on his behalf especially in Catalonia. But by July 1840 almost all resistance was concluded. 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Capital Barcelona Official languages Catalan, Spanish, Aranese Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 6th in Spain  32 114 km²  6,3% Population  â€“ Total (2005)  â€“ % of Spain  â€“ Density Ranked 2nd in Spain  6 995 206  15,9%  217,82/km² GDP Total (2004) GDP: €157,124 billion GDP per /capita: $26,550... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In May 1845 Carlos abdicated his rights to the throne of Spain in favor of his eldest son Carlos Luis. Subsequently he used the title 'count of Molina'. On March 10, 1855, he died at Trieste where he is buried in the chapel of Saint Charles Borromeo in the Basilica di San Giusto. 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Country Italy Region Friuli-Venezia Giulia Province Trieste (TS) Mayor Roberto Dipiazza (since 2001) Elevation 2 m Area 8,449 km² Population  - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 207,069  - Density 2,480/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Triestini Dialing code 040 Postal code 34100 Frazioni See...


In midst of the first Carlist War, on 15 January 1837 the Cortes passed a law, ratified by royal decree of Regent Maria Christina, which excluded don Carlos and several his named allies from the succession to the Spanish crown and declared them stripped from their Spanish titles. These were: Carlos himself, and his descent, and his ally and future wife Teresa of Portugal, Teresa's son Sebastian (1811-75), and Carlos' nephew Miguel I of Portugal (1802-66), the other absolutist rival monarch in another country. This was grounded on them being "rebels". King Miguel of Portugal (October 26, 1802 - November 14, 1866) was the second son of King John VI of Portugal. ...


Reference

  • Holt, Edgar. The Carlist Wars in Spain. Chester Springs, Pennsylvania: Dufour Editions, 1967.
Preceded by:
Ferdinand VII
Carlist claimants to the throne of Spain
18331845
Succeeded by:
Carlos, Conde de Montemolin

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Ferdinand VII (October 14, 1784 - September 29, 1833) was King of Spain from 1813 to 1833. ... Carlism was a conservative political movement in Spain, purporting to establish an alternative branch of the Bourbons in the Spanish throne. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Infante Carlos of Spain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1237 words)
Don Carlos María Isidro Benito de Borbón, Infante of Spain (1788-1855) was the second surviving son of King Charles IV of Spain and of his wife, Maria Louisa of Parma.
Carlos, however, was known for his firm belief in the divine right of kings to govern absolutely, the rigid orthodoxy of his religious opinions, and the piety of his life.
Carlos remained in Portugal which itself was in a state of civil war between the adherents of Carlos' nephew and brother-in-law Miguel and his great-niece, Miguel's niece Maria II.
Carlism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3367 words)
The Miguel Primo de Rivera's dictatorship (1923-1930) was ambiguously viewed by Carlism; which, as most parties, entered a period of slumber, only to be awakened by the coming of the II Republic on 1931.
Alfonso Carlos had named in 1936 Prince Francis Xavier of Borbón-Parma as regent, as he was the nearest Bourbon who shared the Carlist ideals.
The Spanish philosopher Miguel de Unamuno suffered as a child the siege of Bilbao during the Third Carlist War.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m