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Encyclopedia > Concord, Massachusetts
Concord, Massachusetts
The Old Manse, home to Ralph Waldo Emerson and later Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Seal
Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°27′37″N 71°20′58″W / 42.46028, -71.34944
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Middlesex
Settled 1635
Incorporated 1635
Government
 - Type Open town meeting
Area
 - Total 25.9 sq mi (67.4 km²)
 - Land 24.9 sq mi (64.5 km²)
 - Water 1.0 sq mi (2.5 km²)
Elevation 141 ft (43 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 16,993
 - Density 682.0/sq mi (263.3/km²)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01742
Area code(s) 351 / 978
FIPS code 25-15060
GNIS feature ID 0619398
Website: http://www.concordnet.org/

Concord is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in the United States. As of the 2000 Census, the town population was about 17,000. Although a small town, Concord is noted for its leading roles in American history and literature. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1062 KB) The Old Manse, Concord, Massachusetts. ... The Old Manse, viewed from its Concord River side. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Image File history File links Courtesy of the Town of Concord, MA. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Concord_ma_highlight. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Massachusetts counties This is a list of Massachusetts counties, consisting of the 14 Massachusetts counties currently in existence. ... Middlesex County is a county located in the commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... An Open Town Meeting is a form of municipal legislature, typical in the New England region of the United States. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area codes 351 and 978 are Commonwealth of Massachusetts area codes serving the communities of Fitchburg and Peabody as well as northeastern Massachusetts. ... Area code 978 is a Commonwealth of Massachusetts area code serving the communities of Lawrence, Lowell and Peabody as well as northeastern Massachusetts. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Middlesex County is a county located in the commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ...

Contents

History

The area which became the Town of Concord was originally known as "Musketaquid", situated at the confluence of the Sudbury and Assabet rivers.[1] Native Americans had cultivated corn crops there; the rivers were rich with fish and the land was lush and arable.[2] However, the area was largely depopulated by the smallpox plague that swept across the Americas after the arrival of Europeans.[3] In 1635, a group of British settlers led by Rev. Peter Bulkley and Simon Willard negotiated a land purchase with the remnants of the local tribe; that six-square-mile purchase formed the basis of the new town, which was called "Concord" in appreciation of the peaceful acquisition.[1] The Sudbury River is located in Middlesex County in Massachusetts. ... The Assabet River near Route 2, Concord, Massachusetts. ... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... Peter Bulkley (born January 31, 1583, at Odell, Bedfordshire, England; died March 9, 1659, at Concord, Massachusetts) was an influential early Protestant preacher who left England for greater religious freedom in the American colonies. ...


The Battle of Lexington and Concord was the initial conflict in the American Revolutionary War. On April 19th, 1775, a force of British Army regulars marched from Boston to Concord to capture a cache of arms that was reportedly stored in the town. Forewarned of the British troop movements, colonists from Concord and surrounding towns repulsed a British detachment at the Old North Bridge and forced the British troops to retreat.[4] The battle was initially publicized by the colonists as an example of British brutality and aggression: one colonial broadside decried the "Bloody Butchery of the British Troops".[5] A century later, however, the conflict was remembered proudly by Americans, taking on a patriotic, almost mythical status in works like the Concord Hymn and Paul Revere's Ride.[6] In April 1975, the town hosted a bicentennial celebration of the battle, featuring an address at the Old North Bridge by President Gerald R. Ford.[7] The Battle of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 was the first battle of the American Revolutionary War and was described as the shot heard round the world in Emersons Concord Hymn. ... This article is about military actions only. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... In ordinary English, regular is an adjective or noun used to mean in accordance with the usual customs, conventions, or rules, or frequent, periodic, or symmetric. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Old North Bridge. ... A broadside is a large sheet of paper, generally printed on one side and folded into a smaller size, often used as a direct-mail piece or for door-to-door distribution. ... The Concord Hymn is a song written by Ralph Waldo Emerson in 1837 for the dedication of the Obelisk, a battle monument in Concord, Massachusetts that commemorated the contributions of area citizens at the Battle of Lexington and Concord (April 19, 1775), the first battle of the American Revolution sparked... This Paul Revere Statue in the North End of Boston, Massachusetts, was made by Cyrus Dallin and unveiled on September 22, 1940. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


Concord has a remarkably rich literary history centered in the mid-nineteenth century around Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882), who moved to the town in 1835 and quickly became its most prominent citizen.[8] Emerson, a successful lecturer and philosopher, had deep roots in the town: his father Rev. William Emerson (1769–1811) grew up in Concord before becoming an eminent Boston minister, and his grandfather, William Emerson Sr., fought at the North Bridge.[9] Emerson was at the center of a group of like-minded Transcendentalists living in Concord.[10] Among them were the author Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804–1864) and the philosopher Bronson Alcott (1799–1888), the father of Louisa May Alcott (1832–1888). A native Concordian, Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862), was another notable member of Emerson's circle. This substantial collection of literary talent in one small town led Henry James to dub Concord "the biggest little place in America."[11] Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... The Rev. ... Reverend William Emerson Sr. ... Transcendentalism was a group of new ideas in literature, religion, culture, and philosophy that emerged in New England in the early-to mid-19th century. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Amos Bronson Alcott (November 29, 1799–March 4, 1888) was an American teacher and writer. ... Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. ... Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau[1]) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, and philosopher who is best known for Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ...


Among the products of this intellectually stimulating environment were Emerson's many essays, including Self-Reliance (1841), Louisa May Alcott's novel Little Women (1868), and Hawthorne's story collection Mosses from an Old Manse (1846).[12] Thoreau famously lived in a small cabin near Walden Pond, where he wrote Walden (1854).[13] After being imprisoned in the Concord jail for refusing to pay taxes in political protest, Thoreau penned the influential essay "Resistance to Civil Government", popularly known as Civil Disobedience (1849).[14] Self-Reliance is an essay by Ralph Waldo Emerson. ... Little Women is a novel published in 1868 and written by American author Louisa May Alcott. ... Mosses from an Old Manse was a short story collection by Nathaniel Hawthorne. ... Thoreaus Cove, Concord, Mass. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Civil Disobedience is an essay by Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. ...


The Wayside house, located on Lexington Road, has been home to a series of authorial inhabitants.[15] It was occupied by scientist John Winthrop (1714–1779) when Harvard College was temporarily moved to Concord during the Revolutionary War.[16] The Wayside was later the home of the Alcott family (who referred to it as "Hillside"); the Alcotts sold it to Hawthorne in 1852, and the family moved into the adjacent Orchard House in 1858. Hawthorne dubbed the house "The Wayside" and lived there until his death. The house was purchased in 1883 by Boston publisher Daniel Lothrop and his wife, Harriett, who wrote the Five Little Peppers series and other children's books under the pen name Margaret Sidney.[17] Today, The Wayside and the Orchard House are both museums. Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and the Alcotts are buried on Authors' Ridge in Concord's Sleepy Hollow Cemetery.[18] The Wayside, home in turn to authors Louisa May Alcott, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Sidney. ... John Winthrop (December 19, 1714 – May 3, 1779) (not to be confused with his great-great-grandfather John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay colony) was the 2nd Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Harvard College. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts Legislature. ... Orchard House. ... The Five Little Peppers series was created by Margaret Sidney covering the life of five children with the surname Pepper. ... Margaret Sidney was the pseudonym of Harriett Mulford Stone (June 22, 1844–August 2, 1924). ... Sleepy Hollow Cemetery is a cemetery located on Bedford Road in the center of Concord, Massachusetts. ...


Ephraim Bull developed the now-ubiquitous Concord grape at his home on Lexington Road, where the original vine still grows.[19] Welch's, the first company to sell grape juice, maintains a small headquarters in Concord.[20] Ephraim Wales Bull (March 4, 1806 – September 26, 1895) was the inventor of the Concord grape. ... Concord grapes are a variety of grape used as both a table grapes and wine grapes. ... Welch Foods Inc. ...


Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 67.1 km² (25.9 mi²). 64.5 km² (24.9 mi²) of it is land and 2.5 km² (1.0 mi²) of it (3.75%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Nearest Cities

Within Concord are state routes, 2, 2A, 62, 126, 119, and 111. Nickname: Motto: Art is the Handmaid of Human Good Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1653 Incorporated 1826 A city 1836 Government  - Type Manager-City council  - Mayor William F. Martin, Jr. ... Boston redirects here. ... Nickname: Gate City Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough Incorporated 1746 Government  - Mayor Bernard A. Streeter Area  - City  31. ...


Concord borders the following towns: Carlisle, Bedford, Lincoln, Sudbury, Maynard, and Acton. Carlisle is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States, about 7 miles from Lowell. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1640 Incorporated 1729 Government  - Type Open town meeting  - Town Administrator Richard Reed Area  - Town  13. ... Lincoln is a town located in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. ... Sudbury is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. ...   Maynard is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1639 Incorporated 1735 Government  - Type Open Town Meeting  - Town Manager Don P. Johnson  - Board of    Selectmen Peter Berry Dore Hunter Paulina Knibbe Andy Magee Lauren Rosenzweig Area  - Town  20. ...


Demographics

Main Street from Monument Square, Concord, MA.
Main Street from Monument Square, Concord, MA.

As of the census2 of 2000, there were 16,993 people, 5,948 households, and 4,437 families residing in the town. The population density was 263.3/km² (682.0/mi²). There were 6,153 housing units at an average density of 95.3/km² (246.9/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 91.64% White, 2.24% African American, 0.09% Native American, 2.90% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 2.12% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.80% of the population. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 978 KB) The Wayside, Concord, Massachusetts. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 978 KB) The Wayside, Concord, Massachusetts. ... The Wayside, home in turn to authors Louisa May Alcott, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Sidney. ... Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Margaret Sidney was the pseudonym of Harriett Mulford Stone (June 22, 1844–August 2, 1924). ... Concord, MA.jpg (Will Payne) PD This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Concord, MA.jpg (Will Payne) PD This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 13,090 households out of which 37.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.5% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.4% were non-families. 22.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.08. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the town the population was spread out with 25.1% under the age of 18, 4.2% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 28.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.8 males.


The median income for a household in the town was $95,897, and the median income for a family was $115,839. Males had a median income of $82,374 versus $47,739 for females. The per capita income for the town was $51,477. About 2.1% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.7% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Pronunciation

The town's name is correctly pronounced "kŏng'kərd", in a manner indistinguishable from the American pronunciation of the word "conquered."[21]


Points of interest

The Concord Museum. ... Old North Bridge. ... The Old Manse, viewed from its Concord River side. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson House The Ralph Waldo Emerson House is a house museum located at 28 Cambridge Turnpike, Concord, Massachusetts, and a National Historic Landmark for its associations with American philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson. ... The Wayside, home in turn to authors Louisa May Alcott, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Sidney. ... Orchard House. ... Old North Bridge. ... Thoreaus Cove, Concord, Mass. ... Wrights Tavern Wrights Tavern is a historic tavern located in the center of Concord, Massachusetts. ...

Education

  • Concord Carlisle Regional High School, the local public high school
  • Concord Middle School (consisting of two buildings about a mile apart: Sanborn and Peabody)
  • Alcott School, Willard School, and Thoreau School, the local public elementary schools
  • Concord Academy and Middlesex School, private preparatory schools
  • The Fenn School and The Nashoba Brooks School, private primary schools

Concord-Carlisle Regional High School, nicknamed CCHS, is a public school for grades 9-12, on over 80 acres[1] in Concord, Massachusetts, USA, 17 miles northwest of Boston. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Concord Academy Concord Academy is an independent college preparatory school for grades 9 through 12 located in Concord, Massachusetts. ... Middlesex School The Circle, Middlesex School, Concord, Massachusetts Clay Centennial Center, Middlesex School, Concord, Massachusetts Middlesex School is an independent preparatory school for grades 9 - 12 located in Concord, Massachusetts, USA. It was founded in 1901 by Frederick Winsor, who headed the school until 1937. ... The Fenn School is an all boys private school in Concord, Massachusetts serving grades 4-9. ...

Notable residents and natives

Amos Bronson Alcott (November 29, 1799–March 4, 1888) was an American teacher and writer. ... Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. ... Ephraim Wales Bull (March 4, 1806 – September 26, 1895) was the inventor of the Concord grape. ... Steven John Carell (born August 16, 1962)[1] is a Golden Globe-winning and Emmy-nominated American comedian, actor, producer and writer, who rose to fame as a correspondent on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, from 1999 to 2004. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... Daniel Chester French Signature, Daniel Chester French (April 20, 1850 – October 7, 1931) was an American sculptor. ... Kevin Garnett (born May 19, 1976) is an American professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics. ... Hal Gill (b. ... Thomas Michael Glavine (born March 25, 1966 in Concord, Massachusetts) is an American left-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Atlanta Braves. ... Doris Kearns Goodwin (born January 4, 1943 in Brooklyn, New York) is an award-winning American author and historian. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Alan Lightman is a physicist, novelist, and essayist born in Memphis, Tennessee in 1948, son of Richard Lightman, a movie theater owner, and Jeanne Garretson, a dancing teacher and volunteer Braille typist. ... Gregory Maguire (born June 9, 1954 in Albany, New York) is an American author. ... Robert B. Parkers novel Cold Service Robert B. Parker (born September 17, 1932) is an acclaimed American writer of detective fiction. ... Uta Pippig (born September 7, 1965 in Leipzig) is a former German female long-distance runner, who won the marathon championships of the GDR in 1986 and 1987. ... Margaret Sidney was the pseudonym of Harriett Mulford Stone (June 22, 1844–August 2, 1924). ... Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau[1]) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, and philosopher who is best known for Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance... Samuel Willard (1640-1707) was a Colonial clergyman. ... Gordon S. Wood (born 1933) is Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History at Brown University and the recipient of the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for History for The Radicalism of the American Revolution. ...

See also

  • List of Registered Historic Places in Concord, Massachusetts

List of Registered Historic Places in Concord, Massachusetts as transferred on September 2, 2007, from List of Registered Historic Places in Middlesex County, Massachusetts: // Col. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "Concord". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  2. ^ "Peter Bulkeley: Settlement in Concord". New England Historic Genealogical Society. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  3. ^ Shattuck, Lemuel (1835). "History of the Town of Concord, Mass". RootsWeb. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  4. ^ "Today In History: April 19th". The Library of Congress. Retrieved on April 3, 2007.
  5. ^ Randolph, Ryan. "Paul Revere and the Minutemen of the American Revolution". The Rosen Publishing Group via Google Books. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  6. ^ Gioia, Dana. "On "Paul Revere's Ride" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow". Retrieved on April 2, 2007.
  7. ^ "Featured Resource: Photograph Collection 374". The State Library of Massachusetts. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  8. ^ "Emerson in Concord". Concord Public Library - Special Collections. Retrieved on April 18, 2007.
  9. ^ "Emerson's Concord Heritage". Concord Public Library - Special Collections. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  10. ^ "Henry David Thoreau". Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  11. ^ Kehe, Marjorie. "Scenes from an American Eden". The Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved on March 06, 2007.
  12. ^ Perry, Bliss. "The American Spirit in Literature: The Transcendentalists". Authorama.com (public domain). Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  13. ^ "Thoreau's Walden, Present at the Creation". National Public Radio. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  14. ^ McElroy, Wendy. "Henry David Thoreau and 'Civil Disobedience'". The Future of Freedom Foundation. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  15. ^ "The Wayside". National Park Service. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  16. ^ "The Wayside: History". National Park Service. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  17. ^ "The Wayside Authors". National Park Service. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  18. ^ Lipman, Lisa. "Writers rest in Sleepy Hollow". The Globe & Mail. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  19. ^ "The Concord Grape". National Grape Cooperative. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  20. ^ "All About Welch's: General Company Information". Welchs.com. Retrieved on April 3, 2007.
  21. ^ "Concord". The American Heritage Dictionary. Retrieved on April 10, 2007.
  22. ^ United States Olympic Committee - Baker, Laurie. USOC.org. Retrieved on August 13, 2007.
  23. ^ Holloway, Diane. "Steve Carell's a Virgin, 42 and the worst boss ever". Austin360.com. Retrieved on August 3, 2007.
  24. ^ "Garnett". Boston Herald. Retrieved on October 22, 2007.
  25. ^ "Hal Gill". ESPN.com. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  26. ^ "Tom Glavine". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved on August 2, 2007.
  27. ^ Lamb, Brian. "Booknotes: No Ordinary Time". CSPAN.com. Retrieved on April 3, 2007.
  28. ^ "Gregory Maguire". HoughtonMifflinBooks.com. Retrieved on August 13, 2007.
  29. ^ Kifner, John. "He Said He Had a Pistol; Then He Flashed a Knife". New York Times. Retrieved on April 3, 2007.
  30. ^ English, Bella. "She's home, for the long run". Boston Globe. Retrieved on June 25, 2007.
  31. ^ "Providence College: 2007 Honorary Degree Citations". Providence.edu. Retrieved on August 30, 2007.

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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

  • Concord official website
  • The Concord Life (updated bi-weekly blog of Concord, MA)
  • Public School System Site
  • Concord (Massachusetts) travel guide from Wikitravel

  Results from FactBites:
 
Concord, Massachusetts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (722 words)
Concord was first settled in 1635 and was officially incorporated in that same year.
Concord was a site of the initial conflict in the American Revolutionary War, the Battle of Lexington and Concord.
Massachusetts natives with Boston accent often pronounce Concord "konk-id.".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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