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Encyclopedia > Computer Space
Computer Space
Computer Space game cabinet
Computer Space game cabinet
Developer(s) Nutting Associates
Publisher(s) Nutting Associates
Designer(s) Nolan Bushnell
Release date(s) United States November, 1971
Genre(s) multi-directional shooter
Mode(s) Single player or 2 player
Platform(s) Arcade
Input 4 buttons
Arcade cabinet Unique design
Arcade display Horizontal, raster, standard resolution, 15-inches

Computer Space is a video arcade game released in November, 1971 by Nutting Associates. Created by Nolan Bushnell and Ted Dabney, who would both later founded Atari, it is generally accepted that it was the world's first commercially sold coin-operated video game — and indeed, the first commercially sold video game of any kind, predating the Magnavox Odyssey by six months, and Atari's Pong by one full year. However, at least one non-commercial coin-operated video game predates it (see "Trivia", below). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (850x1321, 398 KB) Summary source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (850x1321, 398 KB) Summary source: http://www. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates computer or video games. ... Nutting Associates was the company that created Computer Space (1971), the first coin operated arcade game. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nutting Associates was the company that created Computer Space (1971), the first coin operated arcade game. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Nolan K. Bushnell (born February 5, 1943) is an American electrical engineer and entrepreneur who founded both Atari and the Chuck E. Cheeses Pizza-Time Theaters chain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Galaga, a famous shoot-em-up from 1981. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... This arcade cabinet, containing Centipede, is an upright. ... A computer display is an interface between the computer and the operator. ... Suppose the smiley face in the top left corner is an RGB bitmap image. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... Nutting Associates was the company that created Computer Space (1971), the first coin operated arcade game. ... Nolan K. Bushnell (born February 5, 1943) is an American electrical engineer and entrepreneur who founded both Atari and the Chuck E. Cheeses Pizza-Time Theaters chain. ... Ted Dabney and Nolan Bushnell created the first arcade game, Computer Space, in 1971 and founded Atari Computers in 1972. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Magnavox Odyssey was the worlds first commercially sold video game console. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pong redirects here. ...


The player controls a rocket ship and must evade enemy fire from a pair of flying saucers using a thruster and a pair of rotational buttons. The player can try to destroy the flying saucers by firing missiles at them from the rocket ship. Today, the game would be considered a multi-directional shooter. A spacecraft is a vessel, craft or device designed to operate beyond the surface of the Earth in outer space. ... A purported 1952 photo of a UFO over Passaic, New Jersey, from an FBI document. ... Galaga, a famous shoot-em-up from 1981. ...


The saucers moved in tandem. There were at least 2 places on the screen where the rocket could hide and not be hit by the saucers.


If, at the end of 90 seconds, your score was higher than the saucers, you would get another 90 seconds of play. The screen inverted color (black became white and the converse) and play would continue. If at the end of this second 90 seconds your score was still larger than that of the saucers, you received another 90 seconds and the colors would revert to normal.


This sequence of normal space to hyper space and back repeated as long as your score stayed ahead of the saucers at the end of each 90 second play period.


The key was that the score was a single digit that went from zero to nine. The next hit would return the score to 0. So, if the play period was nearing its end and the saucers had a score greater than yours, you placed yourself so that every shot they made would score and their total would go back to zero. If the score was close, but you were ahead, you would go to one of the hiding places and wait out the rest of the period.


As the Videotopia exhibition points out, previous efforts in bringing the experience of Spacewar! to a mass market were centered on the minicomputer paradigm of the college campuses where it originated - that of a central computer distributing software to various remote terminals. Computer Space was innovative for establishing the basic form of all arcade games to come - that of a dedicated computing device built to play only that one game. Screenshot of Spacewar Spacewar was an early video game by Stephen Slug Russell, a multiplayer space-combat simulation inspired by Doc Smiths Lensman series of science fiction novels. ... Mass-marketing is the process of widely marketing a mass-produced item. ... Minicomputer (colloquially, mini) is a largely obsolete term for a class of multi-user computers which make up the middle range of the computing spectrum, in between the largest multi-user systems (traditionally, mainframe computers) and the smallest single-user systems (microcomputers or personal computers). ... A dumb terminal in computing consists of a computer screen and keyboard, but practically no processing ability. ...


Computer Space was the first widely available video and arcade game, although it was not a success. For many, the gameplay was too complicated to grasp quickly. While it fared well on college campuses, it was not very popular in bars and other venues. Bushnell later recruited Al Alcorn and created a sensation with the much easier to grasp Pong arcade game modeled on Ralph Baer's Magnavox Odyssey home system's Tennis game. Gameplay includes all player experiences during the interaction with game systems, especially formal games. ... Tourists sit outside a bar in Chiang Mai, Thailand A Depression-era bar in Louisiana. ... Al Alcorn grew up in San Francisco, went to Berkeley, and later was at the video pioneering company, Ampex. ... Pong redirects here. ... Ralph H. Baer (born 1922) is a German-born American inventor, noted for his many contributions to games and the video game industry. ... The Magnavox Odyssey was the worlds first commercially sold video game console. ...


Separate cabinets were produced for either single player games or two player games in various colors. This arcade cabinet, containing Centipede, is an upright. ...


Technical

Computer Space utilizes no microprocessor, RAM or ROM. The entire computer system is a state machine made of discrete 74 series TTL logic elements. Graphic elements are held in diode arrays. Physical configuration is made up of 3 PCBs interconnected through a common bus. Display is rendered on a General Electric 15" black-and-white portable television vacuum tube set specially modified for Computer Space. A microprocessor (sometimes abbreviated µP) is a programmable digital electronic component that incorporates the functions of a central processing unit (CPU) on a single semiconducting integrated circuit (IC). ... Random access memory (usually known by its acronym, RAM) is a type of data store used in computers that allows the stored data to be accessed in any order — that is, at random, not just in sequence. ... Read-only memory (ROM) is a class of storage media used in computers and other electronic devices. ... In the theory of computation, a finite state machine (FSM) or finite state automaton (FSA) is an abstract machine that has only a finite, constant amount of memory. ... The 7400 chip, containing four NANDs. ... A Motorola 68000-based computer with various TTL chips. ... Types of diodes closeup, showing silicon crystal In electronics, a diode is a component that restricts the direction of movement of charge carriers. ... Close-up photo of one side of a motherboard PCB, showing conductive traces, vias and solder points for through-hole components on the opposite side. ... GE redirects here. ... In electronics, a vacuum tube or (outside North America) thermionic valve or just valve, is a device generally used to amplify, switch or otherwise modify, a signal by controlling the movement of electrons in an evacuated space. ...


Trivia

  • Computer Space was not, in actuality, the first coin-operated video game ever made. It was preceded by two months by Galaxy Game, a game installed in a coffee shop at Stanford University. Only one example was built, but it remained a popular fixture at the shop for many years.
  • Computer Space was cloned/bootleged in 1972 by a game company called For-Play as Star Trek [1]
  • A blue Computer Space arcade unit was seen in the original set for the television program The Electric Playground.

Poster for The Day the Earth Stood Still, an archetypal science fiction film. ... Soylent Green is a 1973 science fiction movie starring Charlton Heston, Edward G. Robinson, Leigh Taylor-Young, Joseph Cotten and Chuck Connors. ... Sleeper (1973) is a futuristic science fiction comedy film, written by, directed by, and starring Woody Allen. ... Jaws is a 1975 horror–thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchleys best-selling novel of the same name, which was inspired in turn by the Jersey Shore Shark Attacks of 1916. ... The Galaxy Game is the earliest known coin-operated video game. ... The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in an unincorporated part of Santa Clara County. ... The Electric Playground is a TV show focused on video games. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Computer Space - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (309 words)
Computer Space is a computer arcade game released in 1971 by Nutting Associates.
Computer Space was innovative for establishing the basic form of all arcade games to come - that of a dedicated computing device built to play only that one game.
Computer Space appeared in the 1973 science fiction films Soylent Green and Sleeper and the 1975 film Jaws.
Computer Space- The First Arcade Video Game in 1971 (261 words)
The game was rather simple in design compared to later arcade games, as the display was nothing more than a 13" GE Television housed in a fiberglass cabinet with a single external board for the game electronics and a paint can as the receptacle for quarters fed into the machine.
The designer of Computer Space was Nolan Bushnell who released the better known PONG arcade game the following year.
The picture above is from the CED movie Soylent Green which showed the Computer Space cabinet in several scenes, including a close-up of the game play 08:27 into Side 1 of the disc.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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