FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Compote" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Compote

A compote is a sweet cooked preparation of whole or cut fruit (such as apples, pears, cherries, strawberries, plums) and sugar, usually more liquid in consistency than jams, jellies or preserves. Compotes may also contain spices. Fruit stall in Barcelona, Spain. ... For other uses, see Apple (disambiguation). ... Species Pyrus calleryana P. pyrifolia et al Pears are trees of the genus Pyrus and the edible fruit of that tree. ... A cherry is both a tree and its fleshy fruit, a type known as a drupe with a single hard pit enclosing the seed. ... Species see text The strawberry (Fragaria) is a genus of plants in the family Rosaceae (Rose Family), and the fruit of these plants. ... Plum is also a nickname for British humorist P. G. Wodehouse. ... A sugar is a carbohydrate which is sweet to taste. ... Jam from berries Jam is a type of fruit preserve made by boiling fruit with sugar to make an unfiltered jelly. ... Jelly is a sweet or savoury food gel, usually made through the addition of gelatin or pectin. ... For other meanings of the word jam, see Jam (disambiguation) Jam from berries Jam is a type of fruit preserve. ... Spices are strongly flavored or aromatic parts of plants used in small quantities in food as a preservative, or flavouring in cooking. ...


Known in Polish and Russian as kompot, it is a traditional drink in Eastern European countries. In the mid-1980s, 60 percent of beverages consumed by an average Pole consisted of compote and other home-made concoctions. Today that number has dropped to 30 percent. In some homes tea with lemon may be an alternative for compote (in many Eastern European countries tea is drunk not only after meals, but also with meals). Note that you are unlikely to find compote in Polish restaurants but it is often available in smaller Russian restaurants. It is considered a typically homemade beverage in Poland. Also note that in Poland nowadays compote and tea are being more and more frequently supplanted by fruit juices. // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... A cup of tea A tea bush. ... Juice is the liquid naturally contained in plants. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Compote at AllExperts (241 words)
Compote, known in Romanian, Serbian, Polish, Slovenian, Bosnian, Russian and Bulgarian as kompot (Cyrillic: компот) Lithuanian kompotas, is a traditional drink in Eastern European countries.
Compote is unlikely to be found in Polish restaurants, but it is often available in smaller Russian restaurants.
It is considered a typically homemade beverage in Poland, though nowadays compote and tea are being more and more frequently supplanted by fruit juices in the country.
Recipes for Parshat Shemini - Compote - OU.ORG (1273 words)
The compote can be made by cooking the fruit in syrup or by pouring boiling syrup over fruit and allowing the fruit to steep in the syrup.
Compotes can be made several days in advance of when they'll be needed and can stay in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks (if it lasts that long).
NOTE: For most of the year a little compote goes a long way but with Pesach not too far away you may want to know that it is the one time of year where making 3 or 4 different types of compote in one week is perfectly acceptable.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m