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Encyclopedia > Company (military unit)
Standard NATO code for a friendly infantry company.
Standard NATO code for a friendly infantry company.

A company is a military unit, typically consisting of 75-200 soldiers. Most companies are formed of three or four platoons although the exact number may vary by country, unit type, and structure. Several companies are grouped to form a battalion. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ... This article is about a military rank. ... Platoon of the German Bundeswehr. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ...

Contents

British Army

The British Army identifies its rifle companies by letter (usually, but not always, A, B and C) within an infantry battalion, usually with the addition of a headquarters company and a support/heavy weapons company. The Royal Marines also has companies designated by letter within a commando. However, the Intelligence Corps, Royal Army Medical Corps, Royal Military Police and Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers all have individually numbered companies. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, bicycles, or other means. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... The Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys elite fighting forces. ... For other uses, see Commando (disambiguation). ... The Intelligence Corps (also known as Int Corps) is one of the corps of the British Army. ... The Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) is a specialist corps in the British Army which provides medical services to all British Army personnel and their families in war and in peace. ... The Royal Military Police (RMP) is the branch of the British Army responsible for the policing of service personnel and providing a military police presence on service property, operations and exercises. ... The Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers cap badge The Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME; usually pronounced phonetically as Reemee) is a corps of the British Army that has responsibility for the maintenance of all electrical and mechanical equipment. ...


The Household Cavalry, Royal Armoured Corps, Royal Engineers, Royal Corps of Signals, Army Air Corps, Special Air Service and Royal Logistic Corps have squadrons instead of companies (although the Royal Engineers and Royal Signals had companies until after the Second World War, except in armoured divisions). The Royal Artillery has batteries. Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings... The Royal Armoured Corps (RAC) is currently a collection of ten regular regiments, mostly converted from old horse cavalry regiments, and four Yeomanry regiments of the Territorial Army. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ... The Royal Logistic Corps is the British Army corps that provides the logistic support for the Army. ... A Squadron is a small unit or formation of cavalry, aircraft (including balloons), or naval vessels. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Artillery The Royal Regiment of Artillery, generally known as the Royal Artillery (RA), is, despite its name, a corps of the British Army. ... Remains of a battery of English cannon from Youghal, County Cork. ...


The defunct Royal Army Service Corps, Royal Pioneer Corps and Royal Army Ordnance Corps had companies; the Royal Corps of Transport had squadrons. The Royal Logistic Corps is the British Army corps that provides the logistic support for the Army. ... The Royal Pioneer Corps was a British Army combattant corps used for light engineering tasks. ... The Royal Army Ordnance Corps (RAOC) was a British Army corps formed in 1918 by the merger of the Army Ordnance Department (AOD) and the Army Ordnance Corps (AOC). ... The Royal Corps of Transport (RCT) was a British Army corps formed in 1965 from the transport elements (land, water and air) of the Royal Army Service Corps. ...


British companies are usually commanded by a Major, the Officer Commanding (OC), with a man as Second-in-Command (2i/c). Until after the Second World War, the company commander of an infantry company was usually a Captain, although companies of other corps were often under Majors even then (and independent companies almost always were). The company headquarters also includes a Company Sergeant Major (CSM) and a Company Quartermaster Sergeant (CQMS), the two most senior non-commissioned officers of the company. Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... The Officer Commanding (OC) is the commander of a sub-unit or minor unit (smaller than battalion size) in British and Commonwealth military usage. ... Second in Command is a 2006 action film, starring Jean-Claude Van Damme. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Two Bermuda Regiment Warrant Officers, Second Class. ... The Company Quartermaster Sergeant (CQMS) in the British Army and Royal Marines is the non-commissioned officer in a Company who is in charge of supplies. ... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or noncom, is a non-commissioned member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ...


Canadian Forces organisation is modelled after the British. However, a Canadian infantry battalion consists of three or four rifle companies identified by letter (A Company, B Company, etc), a Combat Support Company, and an Administration Support Company. A notable exception is The Royal Canadian Regiment which names its companies sequentially throughout the regiment from the Duke of Edinburgh's Company (instead of A Company) in the First Battalion to T Company in the Fourth Battalion. Canadian Forces Land Force Command (LFC) is responsible for army operations within the Canadian Forces. ... The Royal Canadian Regiment (The RCR) is an infantry regiment of the Canadian Forces. ...


The Combat Support Company administratively contains the specialized infantry platoons such as Recce Platoon, Pioneer Platoon, HQ and Signals Platoon, Anti-Armour Platoon, and Mortar Platoon. The Administration Support Company contains the support tradesmen which a battalion requires, such as cooks, vehicle technicians, supply, medics, etc.


Irish Army

In the Irish Army, a company usually consists of three platoons. Companies are usually identified by letters in an infantry battalion (A, B, C... etc)


Finnish Army

During World War II a Finnish Army company was usually put in order by from where the soldier's hometown was. A company usually has from seventy five to hundred soldiers in it, divided into about four platoons. Equivalent Artillery units are called batteries.


United States Army

In the United States Army, infantry companies are usually made up of three rifle platoons and a heavy weapons platoon; tank companies are usually made up of three tank platoons and a command element. A company is usually commanded by an Army Captain, although in rare cases they may be commanded by a 1st Lieutenant or a Major. By tradition, the corresponding unit of artillery is always called a "battery." Similarly, the term "troop" is used for cavalry units, including both the horse-mounted units of history as well as modern armored cavalry and air cavalry units. Companies which are not separate from their parent battalion, are identified by letter - for example, "A Company, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment". The letters are usually pronounced using the NATO phonetic alphabet or, before that, the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet, resulting in names such as "Bravo Company" and "Echo Company" (formerly "Baker" and "Easy" Companies, respectively). Companies with a separate Table of Organization and Equipment are identified by a number, and are able to operate completely independently from any other unit's support. Company-sized units which are organized under a Table of Distribution and Allowance are identified with a name. The United States Army is the largest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, bicycles, or other means. ... Platoon of the German Bundeswehr. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Insignia of a Major in the United States Military Major is a rank used in the United States Army, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps, and is the equivalent of a Lieutenant Commander in the United States Navy and United States Coast Guard. ... Artillery with Gabion fortification Cannons on display at Fort Point Continental Artillery crew from the American Revolution Firing of an 18-pound gun, Louis-Philippe Crepin, (1772 – 1851) A forge-welded Iron Cannon in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu. ... Remains of a battery of English cannon from Youghal, County Cork. ... French Republican Guard - May 8, 2005 celebrations Cavalry (from French cavalerie) were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... FAA radiotelephony phonetic alphabet and Morse code chart. ... The Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet was developed in 1941 and was used by all branches of the United States military until the promulgation of the NATO phonetic alphabet in 1956, which replaced it. ... Easy Company is a famous company in the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, in the 101st Airborne Division that served in World War II on the frontlines in the European Theater. ... A table of organization and equipment (TOE) is a document published by the U.S. Department of Defense which prescribes the organization, manning, and equippage of units from divisional size and down, but also including the headquarters of Corps and Armies. ...


Company-sized units usually consist of four to six platoons (each commanded by a Lieutenant), although there are examples of Combat Service and Combat Service Support companies that have seven or more platoons. For example, a Transportation Terminal Service Company normally has two Ship Platoons, two Shore Platoons, one Documentation Platoon, one Maintenance Platoon, and the Headquarters Platoon. These platoons are commanded by First Lieutenants, while the company is commanded by a Major. Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ...


There are some special units that have platoons commanded by Captains, such as some aviation platoons and many special forces units. This is not a punishment, but rather an honor, as those platoons usually have some special operational capacity that requires them to be commanded by an officer with more experience than a Lieutenant. A Captain reports to his commander, usually the battalion commander (a Lieutenant Colonel). However, there are some administrative and other duties at battalion level and larger (brigade or division) which are also handled by Captains, for example the S-1 through S-4 officers of a battalion, or some staff positions in the G shops at division Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ...


A company is typically commanded by a Captain, although there are certain Combat Service and Combat Service Support companies that are large enough, and specially configured to require the command of a Major. The senior non commissioned officer of a company is called a First Sergeant, and this job is usually assigned to an NCO who holds the First Sergeant rank. At times, however, a Master Sergeant (E-8) or Sergeant First Class (E-7) will be appointed to the job in lieu of a qualified First Sergeant. In such situations, the NCO holds the duty position title of "First Sergeant," while their military rank remains Master Sergeant or Sergeant First Class respectively. First Sergeant is the name of a military rank used in some countries. ...


United States Marine Corps

A Marine Corps rifle company consists of: The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ...

A weapons company has in place of the three rifle platoons, an 81 mm mortar platoon, an anti-armor platoon, and a heavy machine gun platoon. This does not cite its references or sources. ... The HM rating symbol (a caduceus). ... Gunnery Sergeant insignia (U.S. Marine Corps) Gunnery Sergeant is the seventh enlisted rank in the U.S. Marine Corps, just above Staff Sergeant and below Master Sergeant and First Sergeant, and is a staff non-commissioned officer. ... First Sergeant is the name of a military rank used in some countries. ... While Executive officer literally refers to a person responsible for the performance of duties involved in running an organization, the exact meaning of the role is highly variable, depending on the organization. ... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... The commanding officer (CO) is the officer in command of a military unit. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ...


The following depicts the structure of a headquarters and service company: Headquarters platoon consists of Marines from S-1, S-2, S-3, the Nuclear, Biological, Chemical Defense section, and the Chaplain section (one Navy chaplain and an enlisted religious program specialist). Next is the H&S Communications platoon, consisting of Radiomen, Wiremen, Techs, Data Marines, and the associated staff. Next is Service platoon, comprised of S-4, Motor Transportation, Food Service, armorers, and Supply. There is also a Scout/Sniper platoon. The last platoon in H&S Company is the Battalion Medical Platoon which provides the Battalion Aid Station, or BAS. The BAS is staffed entirely by Navy Medical Officers (two medical doctors) and Corpsmen.


Disambiguation

Some companies were well enough known that they have been identified with their company letter. Examples include:

Easy Company is a famous company in the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, in the 101st Airborne Division that served in World War II on the frontlines in the European Theater. ... During World War II, the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment (506th PIR) was a regiment of the 101st Airborne Division of the United States Army. ... The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)—nicknamed the “Screaming Eagles”—is an airborne division of the United States Army primarily trained for air assault operations. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is a premium cable television network with headquarters in New York City. ... Band of Brothers is an acclaimed 10-part television miniseries set during World War II, co-produced by Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Company (military unit) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (837 words)
A company is a military unit, typically consisting of 100-200 soldiers.
Most companies are formed of three or four platoons although the exact number may vary by country, unit type and structure.
A notable exception is The Royal Canadian Regiment which names its companies sequentially throughout the regiment from the Duke of Edinburgh's Company (instead of A Company) in the 1st Battalion to Z Company in the 4th Battalion.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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