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Encyclopedia > Common People
"Common People"
"Common People" cover
Single by Pulp
from the album Different Class
Released June 1995
Format vinyl record (7"/12"), cassette, 2 CDs
Recorded 1995
Genre Britpop
Length 5:50
Label Polygram
Producer(s) Chris Thomas
Chart positions

2 (UK) Image File history File links Pulp_-_common_people. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short record, usually featuring one or two tracks as A-side, often accompanied by several B-sides, usually remixes or other songs. ... Pulp are a British Britpop band, formed in Sheffield, England, in 1978 by then 15-year-old school-boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ... Different Class is a 1995 album by Pulp. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... The Compact Cassette logo inspired that of the Compact Disc two decades later. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A music genre is a category (or genre) of pieces of music that share a certain style or basic musical language (van der Merwe 1989, p. ... Britpop was a British alternative rock and cultural movement which gained popularity in Great Britain in the mid 1990s, characterised by the prominence of bands influenced by British guitar pop music of the 1960s and 1970s. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... PolyGram was the name from 1972 of the major label recording company started by Philips as a holding company for its music interests in 1945. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the performers, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Chris Thomas may refer to: Chris Thomas (basketball), a former mens basketball player for Notre Dame Chris Thomas (boxer), a cruiserweight boxer Chris Thomas (comedian), a comedian and former host of syndicated music show Rap City Chris Thomas (record producer), a record producer of rock and New Wave albums... A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ...

Pulp singles chronology
Do You Remember the First Time
(1994)
Common People
(1995)
Mis-Shapes/Sorted for E's & Wizz
(1995)

"Common People" is a song by the band Pulp. It was released as a single in 1995, reaching number 2 in the UK singles chart. It also appears on the band's 1995 album Different Class. The song is about those who were perceived by the songwriter as wanting to be "like common people" and who ascribe glamour to poverty. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as slumming or "class tourism". Pulp are a British Britpop band, formed in Sheffield, England, in 1978 by then 15-year-old school-boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Different Class is a 1995 album by Pulp. ... Sorted for Es & Wizz is a controversial single from Sheffield band Pulp. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pulp are a British Britpop band, formed in Sheffield, England, in 1978 by then 15-year-old school-boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Different Class is a 1995 album by Pulp. ... Slumming (derived from slum) originally referred to a practice, fashionable among certain segments of the middle class in many Western countries, whereby one deliberately patronizes areas or establishments which are populated by, or intended for, people well below ones own socio-economic level, motivated by curiosity or a desire...


The inspiration for the song came from a Greek fellow student Pulp singer/songwriter Jarvis Cocker knew at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design. In the lyrics, the narrator explains that his female acquaintance can "never be like common people", because ultimately, "if [she] called [her] dad he could stop it all", in contrast to the true common people who can only "watch [their] lives slide out of view". However, Cocker admittedly embellished the incident[1] - in the song her character declares: "I want to sleep with common people like you." A BBC3 documentary[2] failed to correctly locate the woman, who Cocker also admits could have been on any fine art course but "sculpture" sounded better. The lyrics were partly a response by Cocker, who usually focuses on the introspective and emotional aspects of pop, to more politically-minded members of the band like Russell Senior. The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Central Saint Martins at Holborn Central Saint Martins (ex-St Martins) in Charing Cross Road. ... Russell Senior (born 18 May 1961, in Sheffield, England), is the former guitarist and violinist in the band Pulp. ...


Cocker's simple four-bar synthesiser line was championed by keyboardist Candida Doyle, and the final single was mixed down from over 40 tracks. Cocker sings in a crescendo of controlled indignation and rage, relieved only by two drum breaks. To keep the single at around four minutes, the final verses that begin "Like a dog lying in a corner" were omitted, although they appear on the album version. These include the peak of the crescendo where the singer paradoxically reduces to an intense whisper and describes the life of "common people"[2]. Candida Mary Doyle (born 25th August 1963 in Belfast) is a keyboard player and occasional backing vocalist with the band Pulp. ... In musical notation, crescendo means that the notes are gradually getting louder. ...


The song was Pulp's most popular single, and became an instant classic in the UK soon after its release. The accompanying video featured an early appearance from actress Sadie Frost, and a dance routine improvised by Cocker on the day. Different versions, including the recording from Pulp's headline act at Glastonbury Festival, a "Vocoda" mix and a radically different "Motiv8 club mix", also appeared on the Sorted for E's & Wizz[3] singles. A frame from Bob Dylans Subterranean Homesick Blues video. ... Sadie Frost Sadie Frost (born Sadie Liza Vaughan on June 19, 1965), is an English fashion designer and former actress. ... The Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, commonly abbreviated to Glastonbury Festival or Glasto, is the largest [1] greenfield music and performing arts festival in the world. ... A vocoder (name derived from voice coder, formerly also called voder) is a speech analyser and synthesizer. ... Steve Rodway (born in Cambridgeshire),[1] also known under the alias Motiv 8 or Motiv8, is an Eurodance music producer and remixer. ... Sorted for Es & Wizz is a controversial single from Sheffield band Pulp. ...


The song was covered in 2004 by actor William Shatner on his album Has Been, with backing vocals by Joe Jackson complementing Shatner's spoken-word style. In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Shatner (born March 22, 1931 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada) is a Canadian actor, who gained fame for his starring role as Captain James T. Kirk of the USS Enterprise in the television show Star Trek from 1966 to 1969 and in seven of the subsequent movies. ... Has-been A has-been is somebody who used to be famous or popular, but their career/reputation has gone down since that time. ... Joe Jackson (born August 11, 1954 in Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England as David Ian Jackson) is a British musician. ...

Contents


Track listing

CD1 and Cassette

  1. "Common People"
  2. "Underwear"
  3. "Common People" (7" Edit)

CD2

  1. "Common People"
  2. "Razzmatazz" (Acoustic Version)
  3. "Dogs Are Everywhere" (Acoustic Version)
  4. "Joyriders" (Acoustic Version)

7"

  1. "Common People" (this is the full-length version, not the 7" Edit)
  2. "Underwear"

12"

  1. "Common People"
  2. "Underwear"
  3. "Common People" (Motiv8 Mix)
  4. "Common People" (Vocoda Mix)

Pop Cultural References

The St. Louis musical collective Common People takes its name from the song.


References

  1. ^ BBC Radio 2 article and audio of September 1995 interview
  2. ^ a b The Story of Pulp's Common People, BBC TV, 2006
  3. ^ Discography at acrylicafternoons.com

  Results from FactBites:
 
Common People - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (472 words)
"Common People" is a song by the band Pulp.
The song is about those who were perceived by the songwriter as wanting to be "like common people" and who ascribe glamour to poverty.
In the lyrics, the narrator explains that his female acquaintance can "never be like common people", because ultimately, "if [she] called [her] dad he could stop it all", in contrast to the true common people who can only "watch [their] lives slide out of view".
Vigay.com : 10 Ways to spot Common People (695 words)
Common people often like the sound of their own voices, often wasting no time in using their ego to loudly tell their friends/neighbours/acquaintances idle gossip, rumour and inconsequential chit-chat.
Common people are notoriously lazy and can't be bothered to find a nearby litter bin, instead resorting to flicking sweet papers or cigarette butts on the pavement or out of a car window.
Common people seem to be unable to control their alcohol intake and this usually contributes to points 1 and 2, and mixing with 6 can usually contribute to a dangerous mixture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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