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Encyclopedia > Committee of Public Safety

The Committee of Public Safety (French: Comité de salut public), set up by the National Convention on April 6, 1793, formed the de facto executive government of France during the Reign of Terror (1793-4) of the French Revolution. Under war conditions and with national survival seemingly at stake, the Jacobins under Robespierre, centralized denunciations, trials, and executions under the supervision of this committee of twelve members. The committee was responsible for thousands of executions, most by the guillotine, in what was known as the "Reign of Terror." Frenchmen were executed under the pretext of being a supporter of monarchy or against the revolution. The Committee ceased meeting in 1795. This article is about a legislative body and constitutional convention during the French Revolution. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Reign of Terror (September 5, 1793 – July 28, 1794) or simply The Terror (French: la Terreur) was a period of about ten months during the French Revolution when struggles between rival factions led to mutual radicalization which took on a violent character with mass executions by guillotine. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... It has been suggested that Jacobin/Sandbox be merged into this article or section. ... Maximilien François Marie Isidore de Robespierre (IPA: ; 6 May 1758 – 28 July 1794) is one of the best-known leaders of the French Revolution. ... Historic replicas (1:6 scale) of the two main types of French guillotines: Model 1792, left, and Model 1872 (state as of 1907), right The guillotine is a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. ... The Reign of Terror (September 5, 1793 – July 28, 1794) or simply The Terror (French: la Terreur) was a period of about ten months during the French Revolution when struggles between rival factions led to mutual radicalization which took on a violent character with mass executions by guillotine. ... For the comic series, see Monarchy (comics). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

Accomplishments

  • Stabilization of prices through the "maximum"
  • Mobilization of France's physical and human resources (conscription of the levee en masse)
  • Creation of a war dictatorship for the first time. France had over 850,000 men in her armies
  • Prevention of counter-revolution and internal rebellions

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Failures

  • Tens of thousands of French citizens are killed
  • Many tens of thousands more are alienated from the Revolution
  • Did very little for the poor, who bore the burden of conscription and grain requisitions.
  • Hospitals, schools and charities became deprived of staff because of attacks on religious orders.
  • Deepening hostilities in the countryside over the dechristianisation campaign.

Prominent members

Bertrand Barère de Vieuzac Bertrand Barère de Vieuzac (September 10, 1755 - January 13, 1841) was one of the most notorious members of the French National Convention. ... The Girondists (in French Girondins, and sometimes Brissotins), were a political faction in France within the Legislative Assembly and the National Convention during the French Revolution. ... The original arms of the Buonapartes Bonaparte is a French family name that is of Italian origin. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Thermidorian Reaction. ... Jacques Nicolas Billaud-Varenne (April 23, 1756 - June 3, 1819) was a French revolutionary. ... Jacques René Hébert Jacques René Hébert (November 15, 1757 - March 24, 1794) was editor of the extreme radical newspaper Le Père Duchesne during the French Revolution. ... Jean-Jacques-Régis de Cambacérès Jean-Jacques-Régis de Cambacérès, Duke of Parma, (18 October 1753 - 8 March 1824), French lawyer and statesman, is best remembered as the author of the Code Napoléon, which still forms the basis of French law. ... Lazare Carnot Comte Lazare Nicolas Marguerite Carnot (May 13, 1753—August 2, 1823) was a French politician, engineer, and mathematician. ... Jean Marie Collot dHerbois Jean Marie Collot dHerbois (1749 - 1796) was an actor and French revolutionist. ... Jacques René Hébert Jacques René Hébert (November 15, 1757 - March 24, 1794) was editor of the extreme radical newspaper Le Père Duchesne during the French Revolution. ... Georges August Couthon (1755 - July 28, 1794) was a French revolutionary. ... Georges Danton. ... Marie Jean Hérault de Séchelles Marie Jean Hérault de Séchelles (September 20, 1759 - April 5, 1794), was a French politician of the revolutionary period. ... Jean-Baptiste Robert Lindet Jean-Baptiste Robert Lindet (1746 - February 17, 1825) was a French Revolutionary. ... Jérôme Pétion de Villeneuve Jérôme Pétion de Villeneuve (1756 - 1794) was a French writer and politician. ... Claude Antoine, comte Prieur-Duvernois (December 2, 1763 - August 11, French engineer and a politician during the French Revolution and afterwards. ... For the 17th-c. ... Maximilien François Marie Isidore de Robespierre (IPA: ; 6 May 1758 – 28 July 1794) is one of the best-known leaders of the French Revolution. ... The Mountain (in French La Montagne) refers in the context of the history of the French Revolution to a political group, whose members, called Montagnards, sat on the highest benches in the Assembly. ... Jean Bon Saint-André Jean Bon Saint-André (February 25, 1749 - December 10, 1813), French revolutionary, was born at Montauban (Tarn-et-Garonne), the son of a fuller. ... Antoine Louis Léon de Richebourg de Saint-Just Antoine Louis Léon de Richebourg de Saint-Just (August 25, 1767 - July 28, 1794), usually referred to simply as Saint-Just, was a French revolutionary leader. ... The Mountain (in French La Montagne) refers in the context of the history of the French Revolution to a political group, whose members, called Montagnards, sat on the highest benches in the Assembly. ... Jean Lambert Tallien (1767 - November 16, 1820), was a French Revolutionary and politician. ...

See also

The Committee of General Security (French: Comité de sûreté générale) was the committee set up by National Convention during the French Revolution for surveillance of the police force. ... This is an article about the modern meaning of the term public safety. ... The Revolutionary Tribunal (French: Tribunal révolutionnaire) was a court which was instituted in Paris by the Convention during the French Revolution for the trial of political offenders, and became one of the most powerful engines of the Terror. ...

External links

  • Complete list of the members of the Committee of Public Safety
  • Reference for membership of the Committee of Public Safety (in French)

Reference

  • R.R. Palmer Twelve Who Ruled (1941, ISBN 0-691-05119-4)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Committee of Public Safety - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (243 words)
The Committee of Public Safety (French: Comité de salut public), set up by the National Convention on April 6, 1793, formed the de facto executive government of France during the Reign of Terror (1793 - 1794) of the French Revolution.
Under war conditions and with national survival seemingly at stake, the Jacobins under Robespierre centralized denunciations, trials, and executions under the supervision of this committee of twelve members.
The committee was responsible for thousands of executions, most by the guillotine, in what was known as the "Reign of Terror." Frenchmen were executed for little or no reason, although most were accused of anti-revolutionary activity.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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