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Encyclopedia > Commando

In military science, the term commando can refer to an individual, a military unit, or a raiding style of military operation. In some contexts, "commando" means elite light infantry or special forces. Commando units have a variety of specialist capabilities which enable them to conduct these kind of operations, most notable a broad range of deployment skills which often include parachuting, airborne rappelling or fast-roping, or amphibious landings. Commando (disambiguation) - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The British Commandos were first formed by the Army in June 1940 during World War II as a well-armed but non-regimental raider force employing unconventional and irregular tactics to assault, disrupt and reconnoitre the enemy in mainland Europe and Scandinavia. ... Military science concerns itself with the study of the diverse technical, psychological, and practical phenomena that encompass the events that make up warfare, especially armed combat. ... A military unit is an organisation within an armed force. ... This is a list of missions, operations, and projects. ... Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... Special Forces (SF) or Special Operations Forces (SOF) are highly-trained military units that conduct specialized operations such as reconnaissance, unconventional warfare, and counter-terrorism actions. ... Skydiver about to land Parachuting is an activity involving a preplanned drop from a height using a deployable parachute. ... In British English, abseiling (from the German abseilen, to rope down) is the process of descending on a fixed rope. ... Fast-roping is a technique for descending down a thick rope. ... It has been suggested that Landing operation be merged into this article or section. ...


In the military forces of some Commonwealth countries, there is a distinction between commando units, which specialise in offensive or assault tasks, and other special forces units, which specialise in: counter-terrorism and/or; reconnaissance and sabotage missions behind enemy lines. The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... For other uses, see Sabotage (disambiguation). ...


Originally "a commando" was a type of military unit. In many languages, "commando" or "kommando" means "command", in the sense of a military unit. A command in military organization is a collection of units or a group of personnel under the control of a single officer. ...

The French Navy commando Jaubert members storm a naval vessel in a mock assault.
The French Navy commando Jaubert members storm a naval vessel in a mock assault.

Contents

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Naval Commandos (Commandos Marines) are the special forces of the French Navy. ...

History

South Africa

The word commando originated in the Portuguese language, in which it means simply "command". The modern sense of the word stems from the Dutch/Afrikaans kommando, which was derived from the Portuguese word, as a result of contact between Afrikaaner and Portuguese settlers in Africa. After the Dutch Cape Colony was established in 1652, a system known as Commando Law was created. This compelled settlers, known as Free Burgers, who had been released from their indentures with the Dutch East India Company, to equip themselves with a horse and a firearm, in exchange for the right to a piece of agricultural land. When required, a mounted militia force known as a kommando would be formed, to defend the colony. As the European population at the Cape increased it was no longer practical to make every Burger comply with the Commando Law and a voluntary militia system was introduced. Portuguese (  or língua portuguesa) is a Romance language that originated in what is now Galicia (Spain) and northern Portugal from the Latin spoken by romanized Celtiberians about 1000 years ago. ... Look up Wiktionary:Swadesh lists for Afrikaans and Dutch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Afrikaners (sometimes known as Boers) are white South Africans, predominantly of Calvinist German, French Huguenot, Friesian and Walloons descent who speak Afrikaans. ... A family of Russian settlers in the Caucasus region, ca. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Anthem: God Save the Queen Cape Colony Capital Cape Town Language(s) English and Dutch1 Religion Dutch Reformed Church, Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Last Monarch King George VI Last Prime Minister  - 1908 – 1910 John X. Merriman Last Governor  - 1901 - 1910 Walter Hely-Hutchinson Historical era 19th century  - Dutch East India... // Events April 6 - Dutch sailor Jan van Riebeeck establishes a resupply camp for the Dutch East India Company at the Cape of Good Hope, and founded Cape Town. ... Burgher can refer to: a title; in the European Middle Ages, a burgher was any freeman of a burgh or borough; or any inhabitant of a borough, a person who lives in town (in Dutch the word for citizen is burger and the German cognate is Bürger). ... An Indentured servant is an unfree labourer under contract to work (for a specified amount of time) for another person, often without any pay, but in exchange for accommodation, food, other essentials and/or free passage to a new country. ... This article is about the trading company. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an organization of citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ...


In conflicts with southern African peoples (such as the Xhosa and the Zulu during and after the Great Trek), Afrikaner communities and farmsteads formed self-equipped, mounted commandos among themselves. Categories: Africa geography stubs | Southern Africa ... The Xhosa (IPA ( )) people are speakers of Bantu languages living in south-east South Africa, and in the last two centuries throughout the southern and central-southern parts of the country. ... Languages Zulu Religions Christian, African Traditional Religion Related ethnic groups Bantu Nguni Basotho Xhosa Swazi Matabele Khoisan The Zulu (South African English and isiZulu: amaZulu) are a South African ethnic group of an estimated 17-22 million people who live mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... Trekboers in the Karoo. ... This article is about the Southern African ethnic group. ...


In the final phase of the Second Boer War, 75,000 Afrikaners occupied the attention of the 450,000-strong British Empire forces. Because of the numerical imbalance, the commandos adopted guerrilla or raiding tactics, to minimise their casualties and prolong the war. These tactics gave commando its modern sense of specialised raiding forces. Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Asymmetric warfare originally referred to war between two or more actors or groups whose relative power differs significantly. ... “Guerrilla” redirects here. ...


World War II

Europe and the Mediterranean

Otto Skorzeny

Otto Skorzeny File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Otto Skorzeny File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Germany

In December 1939, following the success of German infiltration and sabotage operations in the Polish campaign, the German Office for Foreign and Counter-Intelligence (OKW Amt Ausland/Abwehr) formed the Brandenburger Regiment (known officially as the 800th Special Purpose Training and Construction Company). The Brandenburgers conducted a mixture of covert and conventional operations but became increasingly involved in ordinary infantry actions and were eventually converted to a Panzer-Grenadier Division, suffering heavy losses in Russia. Otto Skorzeny (most famed for his rescue of Benito Mussolini) conducted many special operations for Adolf Hitler, but no Commando organization was developed from this, and Skorzeny essentially remained a Waffen-SS Sturmbannführer (Major). Combatants Poland Germany Soviet Union Slovakia Commanders Edward Rydz-ÅšmigÅ‚y Fedor von Bock (Army Group North), Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group South), Mikhail Kovalev (Belorussian Front), Semyon Timoshenko (Ukrainian Front), Ferdinand ÄŒatloÅ¡ (Field Army Bernolák) Strength 39 divisions, 16 brigades, 4,300 guns, 880 tanks, 400 aircraft Total... The Abwehr was a German intelligence organization from 1921 to 1944. ... The Brandenburger Regiment was a German commando unit during World War II. The unit was originally founded by Wilhelm Canaris of the Abwehr, and until 1944 was an OKW unit rather than a unit of the regular army (Heer, OKH). ... After Operation Greif, Otto Skorzeny was labelled the most dangerous man in Europe Otto Skorzeny (June 12, 1908 - July 6[1] 1975) was an Obersturmbannführer in the German Waffen-SS during World War II. After fighting on the Eastern Front, he is known as the commando leader who rescued... “Mussolini” redirects here. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Waffen-SS recruitment poster; Volunteer to the Waffen-SS The Waffen-SS was the armed wing of the Schutzstaffel. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ...


Italy

Italy's most renowned commando unit of World War II was Decima Flottiglia MAS ("10th Assault Vehicle Flotilla") which, from mid-1940, were responsible for the sinking and damage of a considerable tonnage of Allied ships in the Mediterranean. After the surrender of Italy in 1943, those fighting with Germany retained the original name, and those fighting with the Allies dubbed themselves the Mariassalto. The Decima Flottiglia MAS (Decima Flottiglia Mezzi dAssalto, also known as La Decima or Xª MAS) (Italian for 10th Assault Vehicle Flotilla) was an Italian commando frogman unit created during the Fascist government. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


United Kingdom

Main article: British Commandos

In 1940, the British Army also formed "independent companies". These units were reformed as battalion sized "commandos", thereby reviving the word. It was intended that the British Army Commandos would be small, highly mobile raiding and reconnaissance forces. Commandos were not intended to remain in field operations for more than 36 hours and carried all they needed. Army Commandos were all volunteers selected from existing soldiers still in Britain. The British Commandos were first formed by the Army in June 1940 during World War II as a well-armed but non-regimental raider force employing unconventional and irregular tactics to assault, disrupt and reconnoitre the enemy in mainland Europe and Scandinavia. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... A company is a military unit, typically consisting of 100-200 soldiers. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... The British Commandos were first formed by the Army in June 1940 during World War II as a well-armed but non-regimental raider force employing unconventional and irregular tactics to assault, disrupt and reconnoitre the enemy in mainland Europe and Scandinavia. ...


The Royal Navy also controlled Royal Navy Beach Parties, based on teams formed to control the evacuation of Dunkirk in 1940.[1] These were later known simply as RN Commandos, and they did not see action until they successfully fought for control of the landing beaches (as in the disastrous Dieppe Raid of August 19, 1942). The RN Commandos, including Commando "W" from the Royal Canadian Navy, saw action on D-Day. This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about a Second World War battle in 1940, for the 1658 battle of the same name see Battle of the Dunes (1658) Combatants United Kingdom France Belgium Germany Commanders Lord Gort General Weygand Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Ewald von Kleist (Panzergruppe von Kleist) Strength approx. ... Combatants Canada United Kingdom Germany Commanders Louis Mountbatten J. H. Roberts Gerd von Rundstedt Strength 6,086 1,500 Casualties Canada: 950 dead, 2,340 captured wounded or not; United Kingdom: 600; United States:4+; 311 dead, 280 wounded The Dieppe Raid, also known as The Battle of Dieppe or... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For history after 1968, see Canadian Forces Maritime Command The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was the navy of Canada from 1911 until 1968 when the three Canadian armed services were unified to form the Canadian Forces. ... Combatants United States United Kingdom Canada Free France Poland Nazi Germany Commanders Dwight Eisenhower (Supreme Allied Commander) Bernard Montgomery (land) Bertram Ramsay (sea) Trafford Leigh-Mallory (air) Omar Bradley (U.S. 1st Army) Miles Dempsey (UK 2nd Army) Harry Crerar (Canadian 1st Army) Gerd von Rundstedt (OB WEST) Erwin Rommel...


The British military intelligence organization Special Operations Executive (SOE) also formed commando units from British personnel and Europeans from German-occupied countries. Perhaps the best-known SOE unit was Norwegian Independent Company 1, which — among other operations — destroyed the German heavy water (nuclear) research facility in Norway, in 1941. This effectively took Germany out of the Nuclear Arms development race, leading up to the atomic bomb being dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Heavy water was the nuclear moderator Germany was using at the time (the Allies took a different approach with the Manhattan project). The Special Operations Executive (SOE), sometimes referred to as the Baker Street Irregulars after Sherlock Holmess fictional group of spies, was a World War II organization initiated by Winston Churchill and Hugh Dalton in July 1940 as a mechanism for conducting warfare by means other than direct military engagement. ... Norwegian Independent Company 1 (NOR.I.C.1, also Norisen) was a SOE group formed in March of 1941 for the purpose of perfoming commando raids in occupied Norway. ... The Vemork hydroelectric plant, site of ammonia production with a militarily important byproduct, heavy water. ... Heavy water is dideuterium oxide, or D2O or 2H2O. It is chemically the same as normal water, H2O, but the hydrogen atoms are of the heavy isotope deuterium, in which the nucleus contains a neutron in addition to the proton found in the nucleus of any hydrogen atom. ... The Manhattan Project resulted in the creation of the first nuclear weapons, and the first-ever nuclear detonation, known as the Trinity test of July 16, 1945. ...


In 1942, the British Royal Navy's nine Royal Marines infantry battalions were reorganized as commandos, numbered from 40 to 48. They joined the British Army Commandos in combined Commando Brigades. The Royal Marine Commandos, unlike the Army Commandos, were retained after the end of the war. The Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys elite fighting forces. ...


United States

In mid-1942 the US Army formed the Rangers, in Northern Ireland, under Bill Darby. The Rangers were designed along the similar lines to the British Army commandos, who supervised their training. The first sizeable Ranger action took place in August 1942 at the Dieppe Raid, where 50 Rangers were dispersed among the British Commandos. The first full Ranger action took place during the invasion of North West Africa (Operation Torch) in November 1942. The Rangers distinguished themselves during the D-Day invasion at Normandy. The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Official force name 75th Ranger Regiment Rangers Other names Airborne Rangers Army Rangers Task Force Ranger U.S. Army Rangers Branch U.S. Army Chain of Command USASOC Description Special Operations Force, rapidly deployable light infantry force. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: ) is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... William Darby William Orlando Darby (9 February 1911 - 30 April 1945) was a brigadier general in the United States Army during World War II. Darby led the famous Darbys Rangers which evolved into the US Army Rangers. ... Combatants United States United Kingdom Free French Forces Vichy France Commanders Dwight Eisenhower Andrew Cunningham François Darlan Strength 73,500 60,000 Casualties 479+ dead 720 wounded 1,346+ dead 1,997 wounded Operation Torch (initially called Operation Gymnast) was the British-American invasion of French North Africa in... Combatants United States United Kingdom Canada Free France Poland Nazi Germany Commanders Dwight Eisenhower (Supreme Allied Commander) Bernard Montgomery (land) Bertram Ramsay (sea) Trafford Leigh-Mallory (air) Omar Bradley (U.S. 1st Army) Miles Dempsey (UK 2nd Army) Harry Crerar (Canadian 1st Army) Gerd von Rundstedt (OB WEST) Erwin Rommel... For other uses, see Normandy (disambiguation). ...


Canada

A joint Canadian-American Commando unit, the 1st Special Service Force, nicknamed the Devil's Brigade, was formed in 1942 under the command of Colonel Robert Frederick. The unit initially saw service in the Pacific, in August 1943 at Kiska in the Aleutians campaign. However most of its operations occurred during the Italian campaign and in southern France. Its most famous raid, which was documented in the film Devil's Brigade, was the battle of Monte la Difensa. In 1945, the unit was disbanded; the Canadian members were sent to the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion as replacements, and the American members were sent to either the 101st Airborne Division or the 82nd Airborne Division as replacements. Shoulder sleeve patch of the 1st Special Service Force. ... Map of Kiska Kiska is an island in the Rat Islands group of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska located at 52. ... Combatants United States, Canada Empire of Japan Commanders Thomas C. Kinkaid (navy), Francis W. Rockwell (landings), Albert E. Brown (army), Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr. ... Artillery being landed during the invasion of mainland Italy at Salerno, September 1943. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)—nicknamed the “Screaming Eagles”—is an airborne division of the United States Army primarily trained for air assault operations. ... The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army was constituted in the National Army as the 82nd Division on August 5, 1917, and was organized on August 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ...


The Pacific and Asia

Following the British example, the Australian Army formed commando units, known as Australian independent companies in the early stages of World War II. They first saw action in early 1942 during the Japanese assault on New Ireland, and at the Timorese campaign. The 2/1st Independent Company was wiped out on New Ireland, but on Timor, the 2/2nd Ind Coy formed the heart of an Allied force which engaged Japanese forces in a guerrilla campaign. The Japanese commander on the island drew parallels with the Boer War, and decided that it would take a numerical advantage of 10:1 in order to defeat the Allies. The campaign occupied the attention of an entire Japanese division for almost a year. The independent companies were later renamed commando squadrons, and they saw widespread action in the South West Pacific Area, especially in New Guinea and Borneo. The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ... The first Australian commando units were the Independent Companies of the Australian Army, formed from 1941 onwards, during World War II. The companies were based on the British Commandos and they were re-designated Commando Squadrons a few years later. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Battle of Rabaul, around the main town of Rabaul on the island of New Britain, in early February 1942, represented a strategically-significant defeat of Allied forces by Japan, in the Pacific campaign of World War II. Following the capture of Rabaul, Japanese forces turned it into a major... The Battle of Timor (1942–43) occurred on the island of Timor, in the Pacific theatre of World War II. It involved forces from the Empire of Japan, which invaded on February 20, 1942, on one side and Allied personnel, predominantly from Australia and the Netherlands, on the other. ... Location of New Ireland Province New Ireland (Tok Pisin: Niu Ailan) is a about 8,650 km² large island in Papua New Guinea. ... Timor is an island at the south end of the Malay Archipelago, divided between the independent state of East Timor, and West Timor, part of the Indonesian province of East Nusa Tenggara with the surface of 11,883 sq mi (30,777 km²). The name is a variant of timur... “Guerrilla” redirects here. ... South West Pacific Area (SWPA) was the name given to one of the four major Allied commands in the Pacific theatre of World War II, during 1942-45. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Kalimantan. ...


During 1941, the United States Marine Corps formed commando battalions, inspired by both the British commandos and the tactics used by Chinese Communist forces, from whom they acquired the war cry "gung-ho". The USMC commandos were known collectively as Marine Raiders. On orders from President Franklin D. Roosevelt through a proposal from OSS Director Colonel William J. Donovan and the former Commander of the United States Marine Detachment Major Evans F Carlson, directed the formation of what would become The Marine Raiders. Initially this unit was to be called Marine Commandos and they were to be the counterpart to the British Commandos. The name Marine Commandos met with much controversy within the Marine Corps leading Commandant Thomas J. Holcomb to state, "the term 'Marine' is sufficient to indicate a man ready for duty at any time, and the injection of a special name, such as 'Commando,' would be undesirable and superfluous." President Roosevelt's son James Roosevelt served with The Marine Raiders The Raiders initially saw action at the Battle of Tulagi and the Battle of Makin, as well as the Battle of Guadalcanal, the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay, and other parts of the Pacific Ocean Areas. In February 1944 the four Raider battalions were converted to regular marine units. For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... The Communist Party of China (CPC) (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), also known as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), is the ruling political party of the Peoples Republic of China, a position guaranteed by the countrys constitution. ... A slogan is a memorable phrase used in political or commercial context as a repetitive expression of an idea or purpose. ... Gung-ho is a phrase borrowed from Chinese, frequently used in English as an adjective meaning enthusiastic. ... Marine Raider insignia The Marine Raiders were elite units established by the United States Marine Corps during World War II to conduct amphibious light infantry warfare, particularly in landing in rubber boats and operating behind the lines. ... Combatants United States Australia Empire of Japan Commanders Alexander Vandegrift, William H. Rupertus Isoroku Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi Inoue Strength 3,000[1] 886[2] Casualties 122 killed[3] 863 killed, 23 captured[4] The Battle of Tulagi and Gavutu-Tanambogo was a land battle of the Pacific campaign of World War... Combatants United States Japan Commanders Richmond K. Turner Ralph C. Smith Seizo Ishikawa Strength 6, 470 400 troops, 400 labourers Casualties 66 killed, 185 wounded 700 killed, 3 Japanese captured, 101 Korean labourers captured The Battle of Makin was a battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II, fought... Operation Watchtower On August 7, 1942, the 1st Marine Division performed an amphibious landing east of the Tenaru River. ... The Battle of Empress Augusta Bay was a land and naval battle in the Pacific campaign of World War II fought on the night of 1-2 November, 1943 on Bougainville, an island in the Solomon Islands group, but part of the Territory of New Guinea. ... Pacific Ocean Areas was a major Allied military command during World War II. It was one of four major commands during the Pacific War, and one of two United States commands in the Pacific theatre of operations. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


Z Force, an Australian-British-New Zealand military intelligence commando unit, formed by the Australian Services Reconnaissance Department, also carried out many raiding and reconnaissance operations in the South West Pacific theatre, most notably Operation Jaywick, in which they destroyed tonnes of Japanese shipping at Singapore Harbour. An attempt to replicate this success, with Operation Rimau, resulted in the death of almost all those involved. However, Z Force and other SRD units continued operations until the war's end. Z Special Unit, usually known as Z Force was a joint Australian, British and New Zealand commando unit, which saw action against the Empire of Japan during World War II. Z Special Unit carried out 284 covert operations in the Pacific. ... Military intelligence (abbreviated MI, int. ... The Services Reconnaissance Department (SRD), also known as Inter-Allied Services Department (IASD), Special Operations Australia (SOA) and Section A, Allied Intelligence Bureau was an Australian intelligence and special operations agency of World War II. Authorised by General Thomas Blamey in March 1942, the unit was originally organised and run... Combatants Japan Z Force Commanders Major Ivan Lyon Lieutenant H E Carse Strength 15 Casualties 7 Japanese ships sunk 0 Operation Jaywick was one of the most daring and celebrated special operations undertaken in World War II. In September 1943, 15 Allied commandos from Z Force raided Japanese shipping in... Operation Rimau was a attack on Japanese shipping at Singapore Harbour, carried out by the Allied commando unit Z Force, during World War Two. ...


In 1944-45, Japanese Teishin Shudan ("Raiding Group") and Giretsu ("heroic") detachments made airborne assaults on Allied airfields in the Philippines, Marianas and Okinawa. The attacking forces varied in size from a few paratroopers to operations involving several companies. Due to the balance of forces concerned, these raids achieved little in the way of damage or casualties, and resulted in the destruction of the Japanese units concerned. Considering that there were no plans to extract these forces, and the reluctance to surrender by Japanese personnel during that era, they are often seen in the same light as kamikaze pilots of 1944-45. 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Teishin Shudan (Raiding Group) was a Japanese special forces/airborne unit during World War II. The word teishin may be literally translated as dash forward, and is usually translated as raiding. It may also be regarded as similar to the commando designation in the terminology of other armies. ... Giretsu was a combined forces-special forces unit of the Empire of Japan in 1944-45. ... Mariana Islands (sometimes called The Marianas; up to the early 20th century sometimes called the Ladrone Islands) are a group of islands made up by the summits of 15 volcanic mountains in the Pacific Ocean. ... This article is about the prefecture. ... USS Bunker Hill was hit by Ogawa (see picture left) and another kamikaze near Kyūshū on May 11, 1945. ...


After 1945

Weapons of the modern commando Jaubert are clearly visible
Weapons of the modern commando Jaubert are clearly visible
Members of Tactical Assault Group East during exercises at Holsworthy Barracks.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 413 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2068 × 3000 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 413 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2068 × 3000 pixel, file size: 2. ...

United Kingdom

The UK now maintains one brigade of Commandos (3 Commando Brigade) as part of the Royal Marines; this includes three Royal Marines Commandos (roughly of battalion size), one Army Royal Artillery Commando Regiment, one Army Royal Engineers Commando Regiment, and a Commando Logistic Regiment consisting of Royal Marines and Royal Navy personnel. 1 The Rifles is due to join the Brigade on 1 April 2008.[2] 3 Commando Brigade is the main manoeuvre force of the British Royal Marines. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... 29 Commando Regiment is the Commando-trained unit of the British Armys Royal Artillery. ... 24 Commando Regiment Royal Engineers is a Regiment of the British Armys Corps of Royal Engineers which will be formed in early 2007 around existing Commando trained elements of the Corps; 59 Independent Commando Squadron and 131 Independent Commando Squadron (Volunteers). ... The mission role of the Commando Logistic Regiment, Royal Marines is to provide second line Combat Service Support to Headquarters 3 Commando Brigade and Royal Marines Commandos in peace, in war and on operations other than war. ... For the band The Rifles, see The Rifles (band). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Canada

Canadian commando forces were disbanded and recreated at various times in the post-war years, and by 1979, there were three Units, with No 3 Commando established as an airborne unit. This resulted in a ceiling of about 750 members in all ranks, organized into three smaller company-sized commandos. The three infantry commandos took shape around the three regimental affiliations: No 1 Commando with the Royal 22e Régiment, No 2 Commando with Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, and No 3 Commando with The Royal Canadian Regiment. The Canadian Airborne Regiment was disbanded after the torture and murder of Shidane Arone, a Somalia civilian, in 1993, and other allegations of wrongdoing within the Regiment. Later, parliamentary investigations would question why such an elite commando unit was sent on a peacekeeping mission. (The Canadian Joint Task Force Two, or JTF2, is also sometimes referred to as a "commando" unit, but it is technically a specialist counter-terrorist unit.) Badge of Le Royal 22e Régiment The Royal 22e Régiment is an infantry regiment and the most famous francophone organization of the Canadian Forces. ... Princess Patricias Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) is an infantry regiment in the Canadian Forces (CF), belonging to 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1 CMBG). ... The Royal Canadian Regiment (The RCR) is an infantry regiment of the Canadian Forces. ... Shidane Arone (1977? - 17 March 1993) was a Somali teenager who was beaten to death by Canadian soldiers from the Canadian Airborne Regiment. ... Joint Task Force 2 Joint Task Force 2 The Canadian Forces (CF) does not use the term Canadian Special Forces in an official capacity, and all special operations come under CANSOFCOM (Canada Special Operations Forces Command). ... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ...


Australia

In Australia, the Army's commando squadrons were disbanded at the end of the war. In 1954, two Citizens Military Force (reserve) units, 1 and 2 Commando Companies, were raised. A joint regimental structure for these, the 1st Commando Regiment (1CDO) was formed in the 1980s, this included a previously independent 126 Signal Squadron (Special Forces). During the 1990s, the Australian government perceived the need for a permanent commando capability; and the recently re-raised 4th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment began the process of conversion fo a commando battalion in 1997, using a cadre of 1st Commando Regiment and Australian Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) instructors. 126 Signal Squadron was reassigned to 4 RAR and 301 Signal Squadron re-raised to support 1st Cdo Regt. 1CDO and 4RAR soldiers must complete identical training and selection courses, before being awarded the coveted "Green Beret". One company of 4th Battalion is responsible for counter-terrorism operations and response in the eastern region of Australia and is officially known as Tactical Assault Group - East (TAG-E). This company mirrors its sister unit (the original Tactical Assault Group) in the West (TAG-W), which is part of the SAS. Commandos from 4RAR and 1CDO have recently been deployed to several countries including East Timor, the Solomon Islands, Iraq and Afghanistan. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 1st Commando Regiment is a mixed regular and reservist commando regiment of the Australian Army. ... The 4th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment or 4 RAR (Cdo), is one of the battalions of the Royal Australian Regiment and is one of three combat capable groups within the Australian Special Operations Command (the other two being the SASR and 1st Commando Regiment). ... The Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) is a Special Forces regiment modelled on the original British SAS and also drawing on the traditions of the Australian World War II Z Special Force commando unit, as well as the Independent Companies which were active in the South Pacific during the same...


Other points

William B. Cushing, a daring young U.S. Navy officer during the U.S. Civil War, was anachronistically called "Lincoln's commando" by his biographers. William Barker Cushing (4 November 1842–17 December 1874) was an officer in the United States Navy, best known for sinking the Confederate ironclad CSS Albemarle during a daring nighttime raid on October 27, 1864, a feat for which he received the Thanks of Congress. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy...


Trivia

The terms "going commando" or simply "commando" are often used in the United States, Canada, Australia and Great Britain to refer to wearing no underwear under the trousers. The term originated with American soldiers who preferred not to wear underwear in field conditions because of its tendency to retain sweat and the additional laundry burden. The terms are analogous to the Scottish military term "regimental" referring to wearing no underwear under the kilt. Team CSC going commando at Tour de France 2007 Going commando (or to go commando) is the act of not wearing underwear under ones outer clothing. ... Formal black tie Highland regalia, kilt and Prince Charlie jacket. ...


See also

Joint Task Force 2 (JTF 2) was formed on April 1, 1993 and is the Canadian Forces unit responsible for federal Counter-Terrorist operations. ... The All Arms Commando Course is run by the Royal Marines. ... For the denomination of commando see commando, for the Argentine special operations unit see Comandos Anfibios, for other special forces with Commando on its name see list of special forces units. ... The name commando has been applied to a variety of Australian special forces and light infantry units. ... The British Commandos were first formed by the Army in June 1940 during World War II as a well-armed but non-regimental raider force employing unconventional and irregular tactics to assault, disrupt and reconnoitre the enemy in mainland Europe and Scandinavia. ... The British Commandos were first formed by the Army in June 1940 during World War II as a well-armed but unregimented raider force employing unconventional and irregular tactics to assault, disrupt and reconnoitre the enemy in mainland Europe and Scandinavia. ... The Commando Order was a top secret order issued by Adolf Hitler on October 18, 1942 stating that all commandos captured in Europe and Africa (but excluding sailors), should be immediately executed even if they attempted to surrender. ... A. W. Andrews was a British rock-climber and mountaineer. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Fairbairn-Sykes Commando Dagger The Commandos were formed during 1940 at the strategic directive of Winston Churchill and following a suggestion to the war office by captains William E. Fairbairn & E.A. Sykes, were equipped with a new style fighting knife in early 1941. ... The Korps Commandotroepen (KCT) is a unit of the Royal Netherlands Army and part of the special forces of the Netherlands. ... The Kommando Spezialkräfte (KSK) (lit. ... The Irish Army Ranger Wing (or Sciathán Fiannóglach na hAirm in Irish) is the special forces unit of the Irish Defence Forces. ... Jagdkommando soldiers arresting war criminals during an exercise. ... Philippe Kieffer Philippe Kieffer (24 October 1899–20 November 1962) , capitaine de frégate in the French Navy, was a French officer and political personality, and one of the greatest heroes of the Free French Forces. ... Power Geyser is a clandestine U.S. counterterrorism program to operate a group of commandos with state of the art weaponry created to protect the physical safety of President George W. Bush. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Shivaji Bhosle, also known as Chhatrapati Shivaji Raje Bhosle (Marathi: छत्रपती शिवाजी राजे भोसले) (February 19, 1627 to March 4, 1680) was the founder of Maratha empire in western India in 1674. ... Grup Gerak Khas is a brigade sized formation that acts as the command element and coordinates and deploys the 3 special forces battalions of the Malaysian Army. ... VAT 69 (69th Commando Battalion) is the special forces from the Royal Malaysian Police based at Northern Brigade, Ulu Kinta, Perak. ... The 601 Commando Company (Spanish: Compañía de Comandos 601) is a special operations unit of the Argentine Army, created January 5, 1982. ... The Singapore Armed Forces Commando Formation (abbreviation: CDO FN; Chinese: 新加坡武装部队特攻部队) is an elite branch of the Singapore Armed Forces. ... Special Forces insignia - the Compass Rose Official force name South African Special Forces Nickname Recces Branch Joint Operations Chain of Command Chief of Joint Operations, SANDF Description South Africas main Special Operations Force Specialisations Conducting Airborne operations, conducting direct action operations, conducting raids, Counter-Terrorism, underwater reconnaissance, infiltrating and... Special Forces (SF) or Special Operations Forces (SOF) are highly-trained military units that conduct specialized operations such as reconnaissance, unconventional warfare, and counter-terrorism actions. ... Russian special forces training For the Swedish EBM band, see Spetsnaz (band). ... The United States Army Special Forces —Special Forces or SF — is an elite Special Operations Force of the United States Army trained for unconventional warfare and special operations. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tiger Force was a task force of the United States Army, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade (Separate), 101st Airborne Division, which fought in the Vietnam War, between November 1965 and November 1967. ... Airborne Commandos of the Sri Lanka Army The Sri Lanka Army Commando Regiment (CR) is an elite special operations unit which is a Regiment of the Sri Lanka army. ... The Special Boat Squadron (SBS) (In Sinhalese: Wishesha Yathra Balaghanaya) is the Sri Lanka Navys elite special forces unit. ... // A Marine Commando with the MP5 submachine gun. ... National Security Guards (NSG), is a counter terrorism unit of India, raised by the Cabinet Secretariat under the National Security Guard Act of 1985. ... Special Services Group Logo outside their headquarters. ... Shayetet 13 ( שייטת 13 ) is the Israeli naval commando elite special forces unit. ... The Maroon Berets are an elite armed force that was created by officers from the Turkish Army. ...

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld200607/ldhansrd/text/70129-wms0001.htm

External links

  • ShadowSpear Special Operations Community Website & Forum
  • Royal Engineers Museum - Commando Sappers
  • SCG International Risk provides training to US commando units
  • 30 Commando Assault Unit - Ian Fleming's 'Red Indians'
  • The Commando Veterans Association

  Results from FactBites:
 
Commando - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1830 words)
During the court martial of Breaker Morant, the commando strategy of the Boer resistance- clearly a concept both new and startling to British military thought- was cited as mitigation for the summary execution by Morant and his comrades as prisoners of war.
Italy's Commandos of World War I, the Arditi, were not reformed in World War II, and their most renowned Commandos became the Decima Flottiglia MAS who, from mid-1940, were responsible for the sinking and damage of a considerable tonnage of Allied ships in the Mediterranean.
These were later known simply as RN Commandos, and they initially did not see action until they successfully for for control of the landing beaches (as in the disastrous Dieppe Raid of August 19, 1942).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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