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Encyclopedia > Comic strip

A comic strip is a drawing or sequence of drawings that tells a story. Written and drawn by a cartoonist, such strips are published on a recurring basis (usually daily or weekly) in newspapers and on the Internet. In the UK and the rest of Europe they are also serialized in comic magazines, with a strip's story sometimes continuing over three pages or more. Comic strips have also appeared in US magazines such as Boys' Life. Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... Look up comic strip in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... The cover of Boys Life from July 1917. ...


Storytelling using pictures has existed at least since the ancient Egyptians, and examples exist in 19th Century Germany and England. American comic strip developed this format into the 20th century. It introduced such devices as the word balloon for speech, the hat flying off to indicate surprise, and random typographical symbols to represent cursing. The first comic books were collections of newspaper comic strips. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Four different shapes of speech or thought balloons Speech balloons (also speech bubbles or word balloons) are a graphic convention used in comic books, strips, and cartoons to allow words (and much less often, pictures) to be understood as representing the speech or thoughts of a given character in the... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ...


As the name implies, comic strips can be humorous (for example, "gag-a-day" strips such as Blondie, Bringing Up Father and Pearls Before Swine). Starting circa 1930, comic strips began to include adventure stories. Buck Rogers, Tarzan and The Adventures of Tintin were some of the first. Soap-opera continuity strips such as Judge Parker and Mary Worth gained popularity in the 1940s. All are called, generically, "comic strips", though cartoonist Will Eisner has suggested that "sequential art" would be a better name for them. Blondie logo, featuring Dagwood, Blondie, Daisy the dog, son Alexander, and daughter Cookie. ... Bringing Up Father was a comic strip created by George McManus that ran from January 12, 1913 to May 28, 2000. ... Pearls Before Swine is an American comic strip written and illustrated by Stephan Pastis, formerly a lawyer in San Francisco, California. ... Buck Rogers is a fictional pulp character who first appeared in 1928 as Anthony Rogers, the hero of two novellas by Philip Francis Nowlan published in the magazine Amazing Stories. ... 1914 Edition of Tarzan of the Apes Tarzan, a fictional character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, first appeared in the 1912 novel Tarzan of the Apes, and then in twenty-three sequels. ... The main characters and others from The Castafiore Emerald, one of the later books The Adventures of Tintin (French: ) is a series of Belgian comic books created by Belgian artist Hergé, the pen name of Georges Remi (1907–1983). ... Judge Parker is a soap opera-style comic strip created by Nicholas P. Dallis. ... Mary Worth may mean either: Mary Worth (comic), a soap opera comic strip whose chief character is called Mary Worth; An evil spirit also known as Bloody Mary. ... William Erwin Eisner (March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) was an acclaimed American comics writer, artist and entrepreneur. ...

Contents

Newspaper comic strip

Newspaper comic strips are comic strips that are first published in newspapers, instead of, for example, on the web, or in comic books or magazines. The first newspaper comic strips appeared in America in the early years of the twentieth century. The Yellow Kid is usually credited as being the very first newspaper comic strip, but the artform, mixing words and pictures, evolved gradually, and there are many examples of proto-comic strips. Newspaper comic strips are divided into daily strips and Sunday strips. Most newspaper comic strips are syndicated; that is, a syndicate hires people to write and draw the strip, and then distributes the strip to many newspapers for a fee. A few newspaper strips are exclusive to one newspaper. For example The Louisiana Purchase by John Chase ran only in the New Orleans Times Picayune. The Yellow Kid Mickey Dugan, better known as The Yellow Kid, was the lead fictional character in Hogans Alley, one of the first comic strips and one of the very first to be printed in color. ... This article is about the association term. ... John Churchill Chase (dates?) was a cartoonist and writer. ... ...


Daily strips

The Phantom daily strip from 2005. Art by Paul Ryan.
The Phantom daily strip from 2005. Art by Paul Ryan.

A daily strip is a newspaper comic strip that appears in newspapers Monday through Saturday, as contrasted with a Sunday strip which appears on Sunday. Daily strips are usually in black and white, though a few newspapers, beginning in the later part of the twentieth century, published them in color. The major formats are strips, which are wider than they are tall, and panels, which are square, circular, or taller than they are wide. Strips usually, but not always, are broken up into several smaller panels, with continuity from panel to panel. Panels usually, but not always, are not broken up and lack continuity. The daily Peanuts is a strip, and the daily Dennis the Menace is a panel. Image File history File links Phantom daily strip from 2005. ... Image File history File links Phantom daily strip from 2005. ... The Phantom is an American adventure comic strip created by Lee Falk, also creator of Mandrake the Magician. ... See also Comic strip and Sunday strip. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Dennis the Menace is a daily syndicated newspaper comic strip originally created, written and illustrated by Hank Ketcham since March 12, 1951, which made its debut in only 16 newspapers. ...


Early daily strips were large, often running the entire width of the newspaper, and were sometimes three or more inches in height. At first, one newspaper page only included one daily strip, usually either at the top or the bottom of the page. By the 1920s, many newspapers had a comics page on which many strips were collected. Over the years, the size of daily strips became smaller and smaller, until by 2000 four standard daily strips could fit in the area once occupied by a single daily strip.


NEA Syndicate experimented briefly with a two-tier daily strip, Star Hawks, but after a few years, Star Hawks dropped down to a single tier. Star Hawks is the name of a comic strip written by Ron Goulart and drawn by Gil Kane. ...


In Flanders, the two-tier strip is the standard publication style of most daily strips like Spike and Suzy and Nero. They appear Monday through Saturday, as until recently there were no Sunday papers in Flanders. In the last decades, they have switched from black and white to color. Anthem De Vlaamse Leeuw (The Flemish Lion) Location of Belgian Flanders in Europe The Flemish Region Capital Brussels Official languages Dutch1 Recognised regional languages Flemish: Dutch Brussels: French and Dutch Government  -  Minister-President Kris Peeters Area  -  Total 13,522 km²   sq mi  Population  -  2006 [1] census 6,078,600   -  Density... The main characters of the Spike and Suzy series on a wall painting in Brussels. ... Nero is a Flemish comic strip drawn by Marc Sleen and the name of its main character. ...


Sunday strips

Flash and Thun rush to stop the wedding of Ming and Dale.An excerpt from the March 4, 1934, strip, very early in Alex Raymond's original run.
Flash and Thun rush to stop the wedding of Ming and Dale.
An excerpt from the March 4, 1934, strip, very early in Alex Raymond's original run.

Sunday strips appear in Sunday newspapers, usually in a special color section. Early Sunday strips, such as Thimble Theatre and Little Orphan Annie, filled an entire newspaper page, a format known to collectors as full page. Later strips, such as The Phantom and Terry and the Pirates, were usually only half that size, with two strips to a page in full size newspapers, such as the New Orleans Times Picayune, or with one strip on a tabloid page, as in the Chicago Daily News. When Sunday strips began to appear in more than one format, it became necessary for the cartoonist to allow for rearranged, cropped, or dropped panels. During World War II, because of paper shortages, the size of Sunday strips began to shrink. After the war, strips continued to get smaller and smaller, to save the expense of printing so many color pages. The last full page comic strip was the Prince Valiant strip for 11 April 1971. Today, most Sunday strips are smaller than the daily strips of the 1930s. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x627, 443 KB) Summary Excerpted from the March 4, 1934 Flash Gordon strip. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x627, 443 KB) Summary Excerpted from the March 4, 1934 Flash Gordon strip. ... See also Comic strip and Daily strip. ... Popeye from an opening still from one of his cartoon shorts, with his characteristic corncob pipe and single good eye. ... Cover of Cupples & Leon strip collection (1933) Little Orphan Annie is a full page (later half page or tab) American comic strip, created by Harold Gray (1894-1968), that first appeared on August 5, 1924. ... Comic strip formats vary widely from publication to publication, so that the same comic strip may appear in half a dozen different formats, with different numbers of panels, different sizes of panels, and different arrangement of panels. ... The Phantom is an American adventure comic strip created by Lee Falk, also creator of Mandrake the Magician. ... Terry and the Pirates is the title of: a comic strip created by Milton Caniff; see: Terry and the Pirates (comic strip) a radio serial, based on the comic strip; see: Terry and the Pirates (radio serial) a television series, also based on the comic strip; see: Terry and the... ... The Chicago Daily News was an afternoon daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, and published between 1876 and 1978. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Prince Valiant in the Days of King Arthur, or simply Prince Valiant, is a comic strip created by Hal Foster. ...


Webcomic

Main article: Webcomic

Webcomics, also known as online comics and internet comics, are comics that are available to read on the Internet. Many are exclusively published online, while some are published in print but maintain a web archive for either commercial or artistic reasons. With the Internet's easy access to an audience, webcomics run the gamut from traditional cartoon strips to graphic novels and beyond. Webcomics, also known as online comics and internet comics, are comics that are available to read on the Internet. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... “Publisher” redirects here. ... Online means being connected to the Internet or another similar electronic network, like a bulletin board system. ... Archive of the AMVC hahahahaAn archive refers to a collection of records, and also refers to the location in which these records are kept. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ...


Origins

Example of a proto-comic strip from a 13th century Catalan manuscript.
Example of a proto-comic strip from a 13th century Catalan manuscript.

In America, the great popularity of comics sprang from the newspaper war between Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. The Little Bears was the first American comic with recurring characters, while the first color comic supplement was published by the Chicago Inter-Ocean sometime in the latter half of 1892; Mutt and Jeff was the first successful daily comic strip, first appearing in 1907. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (750x1050, 192 KB) Example of a proto-comic strip from a 13th century Catalan manuscript This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (750x1050, 192 KB) Example of a proto-comic strip from a 13th century Catalan manuscript This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... Joseph Pulitzer Joseph Pulitzer (April 18, 1847 – October 29, 1911) was a Hungarian-American publisher best known for posthumously establishing the Pulitzer Prizes and (along with William Randolph Hearst) for originating yellow journalism. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... The Little Bears may have been the first American comic strip. ... Mutt and Jeff comic book from 1919. ...


Proto-comic strips exist from the time of ancient Egypt, and include medieval manuscript illumination and English cartoons. The 1865 German strip Max and Moritz, about two trouble-making boys, had a direct influence on the American comic strip. Max and Moritz was a series of severely moralistic tales in the vein of German children's stories such as Struwwelpeter ("Shockheaded Peter"); in one, the boys, after perpetrating some mischief, are tossed into a sack of grain, run through a mill, and consumed by a flock of geese. Max and Moritz provided an inspiration for German immigrant Rudolph Dirks, who created the Katzenjammer Kids in 1897. Familiar comic-strip iconography such as stars for pain, speech and thought balloons, and sawing logs for snoring originated in Dirks' strip. Max and Moritz Max and Moritz (A Story of Seven Boyish Pranks) was a German language illustrated story in verse. ... Struwwelpeter in a childrens book from 1917. ... Rudolph Dirks (February 26, 1877 – April 20, 1968) was one of the earliest and most successful comic strip artists. ... Katzenjammer Kids is probably the worlds second oldest comic strip (after The Yellow Kid, which ran from 1895-98) and the oldest one still in syndication. ...


Hugely popular, Katzenjammer Kids was responsible for one of the first comic-strip copyright ownership suits in the history of the medium. When Dirks left Hearst for the promise of a better salary under Pulitzer (unusual, since cartoonists regularly deserted Pulitzer for Hearst) Hearst, in a highly unusual court decision, retained the rights to the name "Katzenjammer Kids", while creator Dirks retained the rights to the characters. Hearst promptly hired a cartoonist named Harold Knerr to draw his own version of the strip. Dirks renamed his version Hans and Fritz (later, The Captain and The Kids). Thus, two versions distributed by rival syndicates graced the comics pages for decades. Dirks' version, eventually distributed by United Feature Syndicate, ran until 1979.


Hundreds of comic strips followed, with many running for decades.


Conventions and genres

Most comic strip characters are unageing throughout the strip's life, but in some strips, like Lynn Johnston's award-winning For Better or For Worse, characters age. The first strip to feature aging characters was Gasoline Alley. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1060x208, 52 KB) Summary Web resolution version of a sample comic strip from The Angriest Dog in the World, by David Lynch. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1060x208, 52 KB) Summary Web resolution version of a sample comic strip from The Angriest Dog in the World, by David Lynch. ... The Angriest Dog in the World is a comic strip created by film director David Lynch. ... David Keith Lynch (born January 20, 1946, in Missoula, Montana) is an American filmmaker. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ageless. ... Lynn Johnston (born May 28, 1947) is a Canadian cartoonist, well known for her comic strip For Better or For Worse, and was the first female cartoonist to win the Reuben Award. ... For Better or For Worse is a comic strip by Lynn Johnston that began in September 1979. ... Gasoline Alley is a comic strip created by Frank King that was first published on 24 November 1918. ...


The history of comic strips also includes series that are not humorous, but tell an ongoing dramatic story. Examples include The Phantom, Prince Valiant, Dick Tracy, Mary Worth, Modesty Blaise and Tarzan. Sometimes these are spin-offs from comic books, for example Superman, Batman, and The Amazing Spider-Man. This does not cite any references or sources. ... The Phantom is an American adventure comic strip created by Lee Falk, also creator of Mandrake the Magician. ... Prince Valiant in the Days of King Arthur, or simply Prince Valiant, is a comic strip created by Hal Foster. ... Dick Tracy is a long-running comic strip featuring a popular and familiar character in American pop culture. ... Mary Worth is a comic strip originally written by Allen Saunders and drawn by Ken Ernst. ... Cover of the first Modesty Blaise novel. ... 1914 Edition of Tarzan of the Apes Tarzan, a fictional character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, first appeared in the 1912 novel Tarzan of the Apes, and then in twenty-three sequels. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... The daily Superman newspaper comic strip began in January 6, 1939, and a separate Sunday strip was added on November 5, 1939. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the title of a comic book published by Marvel Comics, a television program and a daily newspaper comic strip featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ...


A number of strips have featured animals as main characters. Some are non-verbal (Marmaduke, The Angriest Dog in the World), some have verbal thoughts but aren't understood by humans, (Garfield, Snoopy in Peanuts), and some can converse with humans (Bloom County, Get Fuzzy, Pearls Before Swine, Calvin and Hobbes,and Pooch Cafe). Other strips are centered entirely on animals, as in Pogo and Donald Duck. Gary Larson's The Far Side was unusual, as there were no central characters. Instead The Far Side used a wide variety of characters including humans, monsters, aliens, chickens, cows, worms, amoebas and more. John McPherson's Close to Home also uses this theme, though the characters are mostly restricted to humans and real-life situations. Wiley Miller not only mixes human, animal and fantasy characters, he does several different comic strip continuities under one umbrella title, Non Sequitur. Bob Thaves's Frank & Ernest began in 1972 and paved the way for some of these strips as its human characters were manifest in diverse forms — as animals, vegetables, and minerals. A Marmaduke cartoon from September 13, 2006 Marmaduke is a newspaper comic strip drawn by Brad Anderson from 1954 to the present day. ... The Angriest Dog in the World is a comic strip created by film director David Lynch. ... This article is about the comic strip. ... For the American rapper, see Snoop Dogg. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Bloom County was a popular American comic strip by Berke Breathed which ran from December 8, 1980 until August 6, 1989. ... Get Fuzzy is an American daily comic strip written and drawn by Darby Conley. ... Look up cast pearls before swine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Listen to this article (3 parts) (info) Part 1 â€¢ Part 2 â€¢ Part 3 This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-01-29, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Pooch Café is a comic strip written and illustrated by Paul Gilligan. ... Pogo as drawn by Walt Kelly. ... Donald Duck is an animated cartoon and comic-book character from Walt Disney Productions. ... Gary Larson is the creator of The Far Side, a (sometimes subdivided) single-panel comic strip which appeared in many newspapers for fourteen years until Larsons retirement January 1, 1995. ... The Far Side was a popular one-panel syndicated comic created by Gary Larson. ... This article is about Extraterrestrial life. ... For other uses, see Worm (disambiguation). ... Alternate meanings: Amoeboid, Amoebozoa For other uses, see Amoeba (disambiguation). ... Close to Home may refer to: Close to Home (TV series), an American television show Close to Home (comic strip), a syndicated comic strip Close to Home (soap opera), a New Zealand television show Close to Home (film), a 2001 movie Close to Home (film) - 2005, a 2005 Isreali movie... Wiley Miller (born 1951 in California) is an American cartoonist who brings wry wit, imaginative concepts, superior drawing skills and trenchant social satire to the mainstream syndicated comic strip pages. ... Non Sequitur is a comic strip created by Wiley Miller in 1991 and syndicated by Universal Press Syndicate to over 700 newspapers. ... Bob Thaves, also known as Robert Thaves, (born 1924 in USA) is the creator of the comic strip Frank and Ernest which began in 1972. ... Frank and Ernest is a comic strip created and illustrated by Bob Thaves. ...


Major issues in American newspaper comic strips

Since around the 1960s, comic strip presentation in newspapers and the business itself has considerably changed.


In the past few decades, many cartoonists have voiced their concern about the present and future of comic strips, most notably Calvin and Hobbes cartoonist, Bill Watterson. Listen to this article (3 parts) (info) Part 1ʉۢ Part 2ʉۢ Part 3 This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-01-29, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... William B. Bill Watterson II (born July 5, 1958) is the author of the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes and a few poems (which are mostly embedded in his works). ...


Size

The issue most commonly addressed was the swiftly declining size of newspaper comic strips. In the early decades of the 20th century, all Sunday comics received a full page and daily strips were generally the width of the page, today only one newspaper, the Reading Eagle, continues to run many strips in the largest available size. In most papers, most strips drop several panels so that more strips can fit on a page. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... The Reading Eagle is the major daily newspaper in Reading, Pennsylvania, in the United States. ...


Bill Watterson has written extensively on the issue, claiming that size reduction and dropped panels reduce both the potential and freedom of a cartoonist. When Watterson's Calvin and Hobbes grew to fame, he insisted that his Sunday strip be published without cropping and at a half-page size, a move criticised by newspaper editors and a few cartoonists, including Family Circus cartoonist, Bill Keane. The Family Circus (originally, The Family Circle) is a syndicated comic strip by artist and comedian Bil Keane. ... Bil Keane (born October 5, 1922) is an American cartoonist best known for his work on the long-running strip The Family Circus, which began its run in 1960 and continues in syndication. ...


Format

In an issue related to size limitations, Sunday comics are often bound to rigid formats that allow their panels to be rearranged in several different ways while remaining readable. Such formats usually include throwaway panels at the beginning, which some newspapers will omit for space. As a result, cartoonists rarely put much effort into these panels. Comic strip formats vary widely from publication to publication, so that the same comic strip may appear in half a dozen different formats, with different numbers of panels, different sizes of panels, and different arrangement of panels. ...


Second author

Many older strips are no longer drawn by the original cartoonist, who has either died or retired. A cartoonist, paid by the syndicate, or sometimes a relative of the original cartoonist continues writing the strip, a tradition that was commonplace in the early half of the 20th century. Hägar the Horrible and Frank and Ernest are both drawn by the son of the creator. Also, many strips, some of which are still in affiliation with the original creator, are drawn or written by multiple people or entire companies, such as Jim Davis' Garfield and Lynn Johnston's For Better or for Worse. Hägar the Horrible is the title and the name of the main character of a syndicated comic strip by Dik Browne, first seen in February 1973 and distributed to 1,900 newspapers in 58 countries, in 13 languages. ... Frank and Ernest is a comic strip created and illustrated by Bob Thaves. ... James Robert Jim Davis (born July 28, 1945), is an American cartoonist who created the popular comic strip Garfield. ... This article is about the comic strip. ... Lynn Johnston (born May 28, 1947) is a Canadian cartoonist, well known for her comic strip For Better or For Worse, and was the first female cartoonist to win the Reuben Award. ... For Better or For Worse is a comic strip by Lynn Johnston that began in September 1979. ...


This act is commonly criticised by, primarily modern, cartoonists including Bill Watterson and Pearls Before Swine's Stephan Pastis. The issue was in fact addressed in six consecutive Pearls strips. Charles Schulz, of Peanuts fame, requested that the strip was not continued by another cartoonist upon his retirement. Schulz also rejected the idea of hiring an inker or letterer, comparing it to a golfer hiring a man to make his putts. William B. Bill Watterson II (born July 5, 1958) is the author of the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes and a few poems (which are mostly embedded in his works). ... Look up cast pearls before swine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Stephan Pastis Stephan Thomas Pastis (born January 16, 1968) is the creator of the comic strip Pearls Before Swine. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 - February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known for his Peanuts comic strip. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ...


The problems cited with attaining a second cartoonist state that the second cartoonist is generally less funny or compelling than the creator, and also the cartoonist is not as familiar with the characters. Also, many have said that continuing retired strips stops newer cartoonists from breaking through.


Censorship

A more recent and less spoken issue is that of censorship in comics. Stephan Pastis has stated that the "unwritten" censorship code is "stuck somewhere in the 1950s." Generally, comics are not allowed to include such words as "damn," "sucks," "screwed," and "hell," although there are exceptions. In addition, many images such as naked backsides, and shooting guns can not be shown, as stated by Dilbert cartoonist, Scott Adams. Stephan Pastis Stephan Thomas Pastis (born January 16, 1968) is the creator of the comic strip Pearls Before Swine. ... Dilbert (first published April 16, 1989) is an American comic strip written and drawn by Scott Adams. ... Scott Raymond Adams (born June 8, 1957) is the creator of the Dilbert comic strip and the author of several business commentaries, social satires, and experimental philosophy books. ...


Many issues including sex, drugs and terrorism cannot, or can very rarely, be openly discussed in strips. This has led many cartoonists to resort to double entendre and, as in the case of Luann cartoonist Greg Evans on several occasions, speak in a manner that could not be understood by youths. It has been suggested that Triple entendre be merged into this article or section. ... Luann is a syndicated comic strip, distributed in newspapers by United Features Syndicate since 1987, featuring the ups and downs of life for an average American teenager, Luann Degroot. ... greg evans is gay ...


Many of these words, images and issues are common in every day life, a reason that numerous young cartoonists have claimed they should be allowed in the comics. In addition, many of the censored words and topics are mentioned daily on television, as well as in other forms of visual media.


Social and political influence

Chester Gould's Dick Tracy strip for September 23, 1944

The comics have long held a distorted mirror to contemporary society, and almost from the beginning have been used for political or social commentary. This ranged from the staunch conservative values of Little Orphan Annie to the unabashed liberalism of Doonesbury. Pogo used animals to particularly devastating effect, caricaturing many prominent politicians of the day as animal denizens of Pogo's Okeefenokee Swamp. In a fearless move, Pogo's creator Walt Kelly took on Joseph McCarthy in the 1950s, caricaturing him as a bobcat named Simple J. Malarkey, a megalomaniac who was bent on taking over the characters' birdwatching club and rooting out all undesirables. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (900x281, 108 KB) Summary Template:Fair use in Dick Tracy Source: Chicago Tribune Web source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (900x281, 108 KB) Summary Template:Fair use in Dick Tracy Source: Chicago Tribune Web source: http://www. ... Dick Tracy is a long-running comic strip featuring a popular and familiar character in American pop culture. ... Cover of Cupples & Leon strip collection (1933) Little Orphan Annie is a full page (later half page or tab) American comic strip, created by Harold Gray (1894-1968), that first appeared on August 5, 1924. ... Doonesbury is a comic strip by Garry Trudeau, popular in the United States and other parts of the world. ... Walter Crawford Kelly, Jr (August 25, 1913 - October 18, 1973), known simply as Walt Kelly, was a cartoonist notable for his comic strip Pogo featuring characters that inhabited a portion of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia. ... Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin between 1947 and 1957. ...


Kelly also defended the medium against possible government regulation in the McCarthy era. At a time when comic books were coming under fire for supposed sexual, violent, and subversive content, Kelly feared the same would happen to comic strips. Going before the congressional subcommittee, he proceeded to charm the members with his drawings and the force of his personality. The comic strip was safe for satire. A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the dangers of a Communist takeover. ...


Some comic strips, such as Doonesbury and The Boondocks, are often printed on the editorial or op-ed page rather than the comics page, because of their regular political commentary. Conservatives have long warred against Doonesbury, and were recently successful in convincing a major printer of Sunday comics sections to refuse to print the strip. In another case, Dilbert is sometimes found in the business section of a newspaper instead of the comics page because of the strip's commentary about office politics. “Boondocks” redirects here. ... Dilbert (first published April 16, 1989) is an American comic strip written and drawn by Scott Adams. ... office politics is a slang term for the often counterproductive human factors present between coworkers, in an office environment in the private or public sector. ...


Publicity and recognition

The world's longest comic strip is 88.9 metres long and on display at Trafalgar Square as part of the London Comedy Festival. The record was previously 81 metres and held in Florida. The London Cartoon Strip was created by fifteen of Britain's best known cartoonists and depicts the history of London. Trafalgar Square viewed from the northeast corner. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ...


The Reuben, named for cartoonist Rube Goldberg, is the most prestigious award for U.S. comic strip artists. Reuben awards are presented annually by the National Cartoonists' Society (NCS). The Reuben Awards, named for Rube Goldberg, are presented each year by the National Cartoonists Society. ... Rube Goldberg Reuben Garret L. Goldberg (July 4, 1883 - December 7, 1970) was an American cartoonist. ...


Today's comic-strip artists, with the help of the NCS, enthusiastically promote the medium, which is considered to be in decline due to fewer markets and ever-shrinking newspaper space. One particularly humorous example of such promotional efforts is the Great Comic Strip Switcheroonie, held on April Fool's Day, 1997. For that day, dozens of prominent comic-strip artists took over each other's strips. Garfield’s Jim Davis, for example, switched with Blondie’s Stan Drake, while Scott Adams (Dilbert) traded strips with Bil Keane (The Family Circus). Even the United States Postal Service got into the act, issuing a series of commemorative stamps marking the comic-strip centennial in 1996. The comic strip Dilbert as drawn by Family Circus Bil Keane on April Fools Day 1997. ... Blondie logo, featuring Dagwood, Blondie, Daisy the dog, son Alexander, and daughter Cookie. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


While the Switcheroonie was a one-time publicity stunt, for one artist to take over a feature from its originator is an old tradition in newspaper cartooning (as it is in the comic book industry). In fact, the practice has made possible the decades-spanning longevity of some of the genre's most popular strips. Examples include Little Orphan Annie (drawn and plotted by Harold Gray from 1924-44 and thereafter by a succession of artists including Leonard Starr and Andrew Pepoy), and Terry and The Pirates (started by Milton Caniff in 1934 and picked up by a string of successors, most notably George Wunder.) Andrew Pepoy (born 1969 in Holland, Michigan) is an American comic book artist who began working as a professionally while still in college at Loyola University Chicago. ...


A business-driven variation on the "switch" has sometimes led to the same feature continuing under a different name. In one case, in the early '40s, Don Flowers' Modest Maidens was so admired by William Randolph Hearst that he lured Flowers away from the Associated Press and to King Features Syndicate by doubling the cartoonist's salary, and renamed the feature Glamor Girls to avoid legal action by the AP. (The latter continued to publish Modest Maidens as drawn by Jay Allen, who aped Flowers' style to a tee.)


The majority of traditional newspaper comic strips now have some internet presence. Syndicates often provide archives of recent strips on their websites. Scott Adams, creator of Dilbert, started a trend by including his e-mail address in each strip. Scott Raymond Adams (born June 8, 1957) is the creator of the Dilbert comic strip and the author of several business commentaries, social satires, and experimental philosophy books. ...


Underground comic strips

The decade of the 1960s saw the rise of underground newspapers, which often carried comic strips, such as Fritz the Cat and The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers. College newspapers also began to carry their own strips. Bloom County and Doonesbury began as strips in college papers, and later moved to national syndication. The phrase underground press, especially underground newspapers (or simply underground papers) is, these days, most often used in reference to the print media associated with the countercultural movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s, although publishers of those journals had borrowed the name from previous underground presses such as... Robert Crumbs Fritz the Cat. ... The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers, 1st issue, 1971, by Gilbert Shelton The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers are a trio of underground comic strip characters created by the U.S. artist Gilbert Shelton. ... Bloom County was a popular American comic strip by Berke Breathed which ran from December 8, 1980 until August 6, 1989. ... Doonesbury is a comic strip by Garry Trudeau, popular in the United States and other parts of the world. ...


Underground comic strips covered subjects that are usually taboo in newspaper strips, such as sex and drugs. Many underground artists, notably Vaughn Bode, Dan O'Neill, and Gilbert Shelton went on to draw comic strips for magazines such as Playboy, The National Lampoon, and Pete Miller's Drag Cartoons. Mr. ... Vaughn Bodé (July 22, 1941 - July 18, 1975), was an influential artist involved in and inspirational to underground comics, graphic design, and graffiti. ... Dan ONeill (born April 21, 1942) is an American underground cartoonist, creator of the syndicated comic strip Odd Bodkins and founder of the underground comics collective the Air Pirates. ... Gilbert Shelton (born May 31, 1940, Houston, Texas) is an American cartoonist and underground comics artist. ... Playboy is an American mens magazine, founded in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates, which has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc. ... January 1973 cover of National Lampoon National Lampoon was an American humor magazine that began in 1970 as an offshoot of the Harvard Lampoon. ...


Syndication

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
comic strip. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (1530 words)
The immediate ancestor of the newspaper comic strip was the cartoon, especially popular in the late 19th cent.
With the creation of such pioneering strips as Happy Hooligan (1899), by Frederick Burr Opper, Charles (“Bunny”) Schultze’s Foxy Grandpa (1900), Outcault’s Buster Brown (1902), and James Swinnerton’s Little Jimmy (1905), all the essential components of the comic strip (e.g., regularity of cast, use of sequence of panels, and speech-balloons) were refined and securely established.
Book-length fiction in comic strip form has acquired a sizable adult readership in Japan, in the “novelas” of many Spanish-speaking countries, and in the wide variety of “graphic novels”; popular in the United States at the end of the 20th cent.
comic strip — FactMonster.com (175 words)
comic strip, combination of cartoon with a story line, laid out in a series of pictorial panels across a page and concerning a continuous character or set of characters, whose thoughts and dialogues are indicated by means of “balloons” containing written speech.
comic strip: American Comic Strips - American Comic Strips During their early days comic strips were published exclusively as weekly...
comic strip: Modern Trends - Modern Trends Beginning with the pop art movement of the early 1960s, comics have been appropriated...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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