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Encyclopedia > Comanche (horse)
Comanche

Comanche was a mixed Mustang Morgan horse who survived General George Armstrong Custer's detachment of the US 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 640 pixel, file size: 65 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) horse Comanche - the only survivor from Little Big Horn Battle from: http://geekphilosopher. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 640 pixel, file size: 65 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) horse Comanche - the only survivor from Little Big Horn Battle from: http://geekphilosopher. ... A Mustang is a hardy, free-roaming horse of the North American west, descended primarily from horses brought to the Americas by the Spanish invaders known as Conquistadors. ... The Morgan is one of the first horse breeds developed in the United States. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... George Armstrong Custer George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 - June 25, 1876) was an American cavalry commander in the Civil War and the Indian Wars who is best remembered for his defeat and death at the Battle of the Little Bighorn against a coalition of Native American tribes, led by... Distinctive Unit Insignia, US 7th Cavalry The United States 7th Cavalry Regiment is a United States Army cavalry regiment, whose lineage traces back to the mid-19th century. ... Combatants Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, Arapaho United States Commanders Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse George A. Custer â€ , Marcus Reno, Frederick Benteen, James Calhoun â€  Strength 949 lodges (probably 950-1,200 warriors) 31 officers, 566 troopers, 15 armed civilians, ~35-40 scouts Casualties At least 36 killed, ~168 wounded (according to Sitting Bull...


He was bought by the U.S. Army in 1868 in St. Louis, Missouri and sent to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Captain Myles Keogh of the 7th Cavalry liked the 15 hand bay gelding and bought him for his own personal mount, to be ridden only in battle. In 1868, while fighting the Comanche in Kansas, the horse was wounded in the hindquarters by an arrow, but continued to let Keogh fight from his back. Thus the horse was named “Comanche” to honor his bravery. Comanche was wounded many more times, always exhibiting the same toughness. The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... In 1827, Colonel Henry Leavenworth established a post on the bluffs overlooking the western bank of the Missouri River to protect the fur trade, safeguard commerce on the Santa Fe Trail and maintain the peace among the inhabitants. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Myles W. Keogh Myles Walter Keogh (March 25, 1840 – June 25, 1876) was an Irish soldier who was also an American Civil War military officer and later a member of the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment during the Indian Wars of the 1870s. ... Distinctive Unit Insignia, US 7th Cavalry The United States 7th Cavalry Regiment is a United States Army cavalry regiment, whose lineage traces back to the mid-19th century. ... A hand (or handbreadth) is a unit of length measurement, usually based on the breadth of a male human hand and thus around 1 dm, i. ... Bay is a color of the hair coats of horses, characterized by a body color of dark red (known as blood bay) to deep brown, with black points (mane, tail, lower legs, and sometimes the muzzle and tip of the ears). ... A gelding is a castrated animal—in English, a castrated male horse. ... For other uses, see Comanche (disambiguation). ... The buttocks (anatomical nates, clunium, gluteus, regio glutealis) are rounded portions of the anatomy located on the posterior of the pelvic region of the apes, humans and many other bipeds or quadrupeds. ... Traditional target arrow and replica medieval arrow. ...


On June 25, 1876, Captain Keogh rode Comanche at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, led by Lt Col. George Armstrong Custer. The battle became famous when their entire detachment was killed. Comanche was found two days after the battle, badly wounded. After being transported by steamboat to Fort Lincoln, he was slowly nursed back to health. Combatants Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, Arapaho United States Commanders Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse George A. Custer â€ , Marcus Reno, Frederick Benteen, James Calhoun â€  Strength 949 lodges (probably 950-1,200 warriors) 31 officers, 566 troopers, 15 armed civilians, ~35-40 scouts Casualties At least 36 killed, ~168 wounded (according to Sitting Bull... “Custer” redirects here. ... Paddle steamers — Lucerne, Switzerland. ... Fort Abraham Lincoln was an important infantry and cavalry post about seven miles south of todays Mandan, North Dakota. ...


After a lengthy convalescence, Comanche was retired and orders were given that he should never be ridden again. As an honor, he was made “Second Commanding Officer” of the 7th Cavalry. At Fort Riley , he became something of a pet, occasionally leading parades and indulging in a fondness for beer. Fort Riley is a census-designated place and United States Army post, in Northeast Kansas, on the Kansas River. ... Marines on parade A parade is an organized procession of people along a street, often in costume, and often accompanied by decorated vehicles called floats or sometimes large lighter-than-air balloons with complex shapes. ... Beer in a glass Schlenkerla Rauchbier direct from the cask Beer is the worlds oldest[1] and most popular[2] alcoholic beverage. ...


Comanche died in 1890. He is one of only two horses in United States history to be buried with Full Military Honors, the other being Black Jack.[1] 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... A caisson bearing a coffin, with military escort. ... Black Jack, the riderless horse A coal-black Morgan-Quarter Horse cross, Black Jack served in the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiments (The Old Guard) Caisson Platoon. ...


His remains were sent to the University of Kansas and preserved, where they can still be seen. The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ...


Comanche is often described as the sole survivor of Custer's detachment, but like so many other legends surrounding the Little Bighorn battle, this one is false. As historian Evan S. Connell writes in Son of the Morning Star: Evan S. Connell (b. ... Son of the Morning Star is a 1984 book, a 1991 television film based on the book, and a 2007 feature film also based on the book. ...


"Comanche was reputed to be the only survivor of the Little Bighorn, but quite a few Seventh Cavalry mounts survived, probably more than one hundred, and there was even a yellow bulldog. Comanche lived on another fifteen years, and when he died, he was stuffed and to this day remains in a glass case at the University of Kansas. So, protected from moths and souvenir hunters by his humidity-controlled glass case, Comanche stands patiently, enduring generation after generation of undergraduate jokes. The other horses are gone, and the mysterious yellow bulldog is gone, which means that in a sense the legend is true. Comanche alone survived."


Notes

  1. ^ Belcher, Nancy Hoyt. (http://www.aaa.com/aaa/006/EnCompass/2004/jun/jun_GuardingHistory.html) "Guarding History and Tradition." EnCompass, Volume 78, Issue 4, July-August 2004.

See also

Comanche display [1] Military animals are creatures that have been employed by humankind for use in warfare. ... A modern-day knight on a draft horse in late medieval plate armor jousting at a Renaissance Fair War Horses have been used in human warfare for millennia, probably since the time of domestication of the horse. ... Combatants Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, Arapaho United States Commanders Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse George A. Custer â€ , Marcus Reno, Frederick Benteen, James Calhoun â€  Strength 949 lodges (probably 950-1,200 warriors) 31 officers, 566 troopers, 15 armed civilians, ~35-40 scouts Casualties At least 36 killed, ~168 wounded (according to Sitting Bull... Distinctive Unit Insignia, US 7th Cavalry The United States 7th Cavalry Regiment is a United States Army cavalry regiment, whose lineage traces back to the mid-19th century. ...


Comanche movies: Comanche (2000) with Kris Kristofferson [2] and Tonka (1958) with Sal Mineo based on the book by David Appel [3] This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Salvatore Mineo, Jr. ...


 
 

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