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Encyclopedia > Columbia University
Columbia University in the City of New York

Motto: In lumine Tuo videbimus lumen (Latin)
Motto in English: In Thy light shall we see light (a paraphrase of Psalms 36:9)
Established: 1754
Type: Private
Endowment: US $7.15 Billion[1]
President: Lee Bollinger
Faculty: 3,543[2]
Students: 24,820[3]
Undergraduates: 6,923[4]
Postgraduates: 15,731[5]
Location: Flag of the United States New York, NY
Campus: Urban, 36 acres (0.15 km²) Morningside Heights Campus, 26 acres (0.1 km²), Baker Field athletic complex, 20 acres (0.09 km²), Medical Center, 157 acres (0.64 km²) Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, 60 acres (0.25 km²), Nevis Laboratories, Reid Hall (Paris)
Former names: *King's College (1754-1776)
*Columbia College (1784-1896)
Newspaper: Columbia Daily Spectator
Colors: Columbia blue and White           
Nickname: Columbia Lions
Athletics: NCAA Division I FCS, Ivy League
29 sports teams
Website: www.columbia.edu
Alma Mater
Alma Mater

Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. Columbia University coat of arms This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Lee C. Bollinger is an American lawyer and educator who is currently serving as the 19th president of Columbia University. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily newspaper, written by Columbia University undergraduates, servicing the university community and the neighborhood of Morningside Heights. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Columbia blue is a light blue tertiary color. ... This article is about the color. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... // The Ivy League Columbia University, whose athletic teams go by the name lions, are part of the Ivy League, which includes Columbia, University of Pennsylvania, Cornell, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...


Columbia's main campus lies in the Morningside Heights neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan, in New York City. The university is legally known as Columbia University in the City of New York. The institution was established as King's College by the Church of England, receiving a Royal Charter in 1754 from George II of Great Britain. It was the first college established in New York, and the fifth college established in the Thirteen Colonies. After the American Revolution it was briefly chartered as a state entity from 1784-1787, however the university now operates under a 1787 charter that places the institution under a private board of trustees. This article is about the neighbourhood in New York City. ... The Five Boroughs redirects here. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... This article is about the state. ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ...


Columbia University is home to the Pulitzer Prize, which, for over a century, has rewarded outstanding achievement in journalism, literature and music. As of October 2007, 76 Nobel Prize winners have been affiliated with Columbia (Columbia's official count does not include faculties affiliated for less than one year. If they were included, the total would be 87.) [7]. The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ...


Columbia was the birthplace of FM radio, the first American university to offer historic preservation, anthropology and political science as academic disciplines, the first American school to grant the M.D. degree, and the birthplace of modern genetics. An early research center for Manhattan Project development of the atomic bomb, its Morningside Heights campus was the first North American site where the uranium atom was split. Literary and artistic movements as varied as the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat movement and postcolonialism all took shape within Columbia's gates in the 20th century. FM broadcasting is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation (FM) to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... Demolition of the former Penn Station concourse raised public awareness about preservation Historic preservation is the act of maintaining and repairing existing historic materials and the retention of a propertys form as it has evolved over time. ... This article is about the social science. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... // An academic discipline, or field of study, is a branch of knowledge which is taught or researched at the college or university level. ... Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter A nuclear weapon derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions of fusion or fission. ... North American redirects here. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... For other uses, see Atom (disambiguation). ... The Harlem Renaissance was named after the anthology The New Negro, edited by Alain Locke in 1925. ... Beats redirects here. ... Postcolonialism (postcolonial theory, post-colonial theory) is a set of theories in philosophy, film, political sciences and literature that deal with the cultural legacy of colonial rule. ...


Columbia has a long tradition of educating American heads of state. U.S. Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin D. Roosevelt both studied law at Columbia, and Dwight D. Eisenhower was president of the University before making his White House bid. Current Democratic Party presidential candidate Barack Obama and Libertarian Party candidate Mike Gravel received their undergraduate degrees at Columbia, as did current U.S. Attorney General Michael Mukasey and a number of current U.S. Senators and Members of Congress. For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... FDR redirects here. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... “Barack” redirects here. ... Libertarian Party can refer to several libertarian political parties, including: United States Libertarian Party Libertarian Party of Canada Movimiento Libertario of Costa Rica The Libertarianz of New Zealand Libertarian Party of Australia There are also political parties that hold some of the same policies as the above parties but do... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (pronounced ) (born May 13, 1930) is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska, who served two terms from 1969 to 1981, and is a candidate in the 2008 presidential election. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Michael B. Mukasey (born 1941) is a Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...


The university is affiliated with Barnard College (BC), Teachers College, and the Union Theological Seminary (UTS), all located nearby in Morningside Heights. A joint undergraduate program is available through the Jewish Theological Seminary of America as well as through the Juilliard School.[6] Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... Teachers College, Columbia University (sometimes referred to simply as Teachers College; also referred to as Teachers College of Columbia University or the Columbia University Graduate School of Education) is a top ranked graduate school of education in the United States. ... The tower at Union Theological Seminary Birds-eye view at Claremont Ave. ... The Jewish Theological Seminary of America The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, known in the Jewish community simply as JTS, is one of the academic and spiritual centers of Conservative Judaism. ... The Juilliard School is one of the worlds premier performing arts conservatories, in New York City. ...

Contents

Campus

Morningside Heights

Most of Columbia's graduate and undergraduate studies are conducted in Morningside Heights at Seth Low's late-19th century vision of a university campus where all disciplines could be taught in one location. The campus was designed along Beaux-Arts principles by acclaimed architects McKim, Mead, and White and is considered one of their best works. This article is about the neighbourhood in New York City. ... Seth Low, born in Brooklyn, New York, (January 18, 1850 - September 17, 1916) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... McKim, Mead, and White was a prominent architectural firm in the eastern United States at the turn of the twentieth century. ...

Butler Library (June 2003)

Columbia's main campus occupies more than six city blocks, or 32 acres (132,000 m²), in Morningside Heights, a neighborhood located between the Upper West Side and Harlem sections of Manhattan that contains a number of academic institutions. The university owns over 7,000 apartments in Morningside Heights, which house faculty, graduate students, and staff. Almost two dozen undergraduate dormitories (purpose-built or converted) are located on campus or in Morningside Heights.[7] Photo of Columbia University at New York City (taken June 15, 2003 by djmutex), herewith licensed under GFDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Photo of Columbia University at New York City (taken June 15, 2003 by djmutex), herewith licensed under GFDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Butler Library The Nicholas Murray Butler Library, commonly known simply as Butler Library, is the largest single library in the Columbia University Library System, which contains over 8. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... City Blocks are a part of the fictional universe recounted in the Judge Dredd series that appears in the UK comic book 2000 AD. // Overview Also known as starscrapers or stratoscrapers (compare skyscraper), they are the most common form of mass-housing in Mega-City One, averaging a population of... Morningside Heights is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City and is bound by the Upper West Side, Morningside Park, Harlem, and Riverside Park (some now consider it part of the Upper West Side). ... The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...

Low Memorial Library
Low Memorial Library

New buildings and structures on the campus, especially those built following the Second World War, have often only been constructed after a contentious process often involving open debate and protest over the new structures. Often the complaints raised by these protests during these periods of expansion have included issues beyond the debate over the construction of any of the architectural features which diverged from the original McKim, Mead, and White plan, and often involved complaints against the administration of the university. This was the case with Uris Hall, which sits behind Low Library, built in the 1960s, and the more recent Alfred Lerner Hall, a deconstructivist structure completed in 1998 and designed by Columbia's then-Dean of Architecture, Bernard Tschumi. Elements of these same issues have been reflected in the current debate over the future expansion of the campus into Manhattanville, several blocks uptown from the current campus.[8] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 419 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Low Memorial Library, Columbia university, New York City. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 419 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Low Memorial Library, Columbia university, New York City. ... An architectural structure is a free-standing or guy anchored manmade outdoor construction for permanent use. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Alfred Lerner Hall, with Carman Hall rising in the background Alfred Lerner Hall is the student center or students union of Columbia University named for Al Lerner, who financed its construction. ... Libeskinds Imperial War Museum North in Manchester comprises three apparently intersecting curved volumes. ... Bernard Tschumi (born January 25, 1944 Lausanne, Switzerland) is an architect, writer, and educator. ... 125th Street station at Broadway and 125th Street, one of Manhattanvilles primary landmarks Manhattanville is the part of Manhattan in New York City bordered on the south by Morningside Heights on the west by the Hudson river, on the east by Harlem and on the north by Hamilton Heights...

"College Walk" provides a public path between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue, cutting through the main campus quad.
"College Walk" provides a public path between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue, cutting through the main campus quad.

Columbia's library system includes over nine million volumes.[9] One library of note on campus is the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library which is the largest library of architecture in the United States and among, if not the largest, in the world.[10] The library contains more than 400,000 volumes, of which most are non-circulating and must be read on site. One of the library's prominent undertakings is the Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals, which is one of the foremost international resources for locating citations to architecture and related topics in periodical literature. The Avery Index covers periodicals thoroughly back to the 1930s, with limited coverage dating to the nineteenth century, up to the present day. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1436 KB) Summary Columbia University College Walk Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Columbia University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1436 KB) Summary Columbia University College Walk Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Columbia University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... The Columbia University Library System, with over 9. ... The Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library is part of Columbia Universitys library system. ...

Interior of the bridge between Pupin and Schapiro buildings

Several buildings on the Morningside Heights campus are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Low Memorial Library, the centerpiece of the campus, is listed for its architectural significance. Philosophy Hall is listed as the site of the invention of FM radio. Also listed is Pupin Hall, also a National Historic Landmark, which houses the physics and astronomy departments, where initial experiments on the nuclear fission of uranium were conducted by Enrico Fermi. The uranium atom was split there ten days after the world's first atom-splitting in Copenhagenhaper, Denmark. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 145 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Interior of the bridge between Pupin and Schapiro buildings at Columbia University I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 145 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Interior of the bridge between Pupin and Schapiro buildings at Columbia University I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Low Library The Low Memorial Library is the administrative centre of Columbia University. ... Rodins The Thinker with Philosophy Hall in the background Philosophy Hall is the home of the English, Philosophy, and several language departments at Columbia University in New York City. ... FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... Pupin Hall Pupin Hall is the home of Columbia Universitys Physics Department. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Fermi redirects here. ...


Other campuses

A view of Columbia University. Note that College Walk was under construction for Summer 2007.
A view of Columbia University. Note that College Walk was under construction for Summer 2007.

Health-related schools are located at the Columbia University Medical Center, twenty acres located in the neighborhood of Washington Heights, fifty blocks uptown. Columbia also owns the 26 acre Baker Field, which includes the Lawrence A. Wien Stadium as well as facilities for field sports, outdoor track, tennis, and growing small trains at the northern tip of Manhattan island (in the neighborhood of Inwood). There is a third campus on the west bank of the Hudson River, the 157-acre (0.64 km²) Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, New York, and another, the 60 acre Nevis Laboratories, in Irvington, New York. There is a satellite campus in Paris, Reid Hall. The Arden House in Harriman, New York is primarily used for the Executive MBA Program. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 177 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)View of Columbia University I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 177 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)View of Columbia University I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of... Columbia University Medical Center is name of the medical complex associated with Columbia University located in Washington Heights area of Manhattan. ... Washington Heights seen from the west tower of the George Washington Bridge. ... Lawrence A. Wien Stadium is a stadium located in Manhattan, New York. ... Broadway and Dyckman Street intersection in Inwood. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is a world-class research institution specializing in earth sciences and part of Columbia University. ... Palisades, New York is a very small hamlet, part of the Town of Orangetown, located in southeastern Rockland County, New York. ... Nevis Labs is a research center owned and operated by Columbia University. ... Irvington is a village in Westchester County, New York, USA. The population was 6,631 at the 2000 census. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Reid Hall is a complex of academic facilities owned and operated by Columbia University that is located in the Montparnasse district of Paris, France. ... Harriman is a village located in Orange County, New York. ...


University Hospital

New York-Presbyterian Hospital is affiliated with medical schools of both Columbia and Cornell universities. According to the US News and World Report's Americas Best Hospitals 2007, it is ranked 6th overall (3rd among university hospitals). Columbia medical school has a strategic partnership with New York State Psychiatric Institute. Columbia is also affiliated with nineteen hospitals in the US and four hospitals overseas.


History

Columbia is the oldest institution of higher education in the state of New York. Founded and chartered as King's College in 1754, Columbia is the sixth-oldest such institution in the United States (by date of founding; fifth by date of chartering). After the American Revolutionary War, King's College was renamed Columbia College in 1784, and in 1896 it was further renamed Columbia University. Columbia has grown over time to encompass twenty schools and affiliated institutions. This article is about the state. ... This article is about military actions only. ...


King's College: 1754-1776

Trinity Church schoolyard, the first home of King's College c.1755
Trinity Church schoolyard, the first home of King's College c.1755

Discussions regarding the foundation of a college in New York began as early as 1704, but serious consideration of such proposals was not entertained until the early 1750s, when local graduates of Yale and members of the congregation of Trinity Church (then Church of England, now Episcopal) in New York City became alarmed by the establishment of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University); both because it was founded by "new-light" Presbyterians influenced by the evangelical Great Awakening and, as it was located in the province just across the Hudson River, because it provoked fears of New York developing a cultural and intellectual inferiority. They established their own 'rival' institution, King's College, and elected as its first president Samuel Johnson. Classes began on July 17, 1754 in Trinity Church yard, with Johnson as the sole faculty member. A few months later, on October 31, 1754, Great Britain's King George II officially granted a royal charter for the college. In 1760, King's College moved to its own building at Park Place, near the present City Hall, and in 1767 it established the first American medical school to grant the M.D. degree. Image File history File links Columbiatrinity. ... Image File history File links Columbiatrinity. ... Yale redirects here. ... Trinity Church Close-up of Trinity Church Trinity Church, at the corner of Broadway and Wall Street in New York City, viewed from the World Trade Center A glimpse of New York from Trinity Church steeple. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Great Awakenings refer to several periods of dramatic religious revival in Anglo-American religious history. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Rev. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... ... Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. A medical school or faculty of medicine is a tertiary educational institution — or part of such an institution — that teaches medicine. ... The Medicinæ Doctor or Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or D.M.) is a doctorate level degree held by medical doctors. ...

The Rev. Dr. Samuel Johnson, first president of King's College
The Rev. Dr. Samuel Johnson, first president of King's College

Controversy surrounded the founding of the new college in New York, as it was a thoroughly Church of England institution dominated by the influence of Crown officials, such as the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Crown Secretary for Plantations and Colonies, in its governing body. Fears of the establishment of a Church of England episcopacy and of Crown influence in America through King's College were underpinned by its vast wealth, far surpassing all other colonial colleges of the period.[11] Image File history File links Johnson2. ... Image File history File links Johnson2. ... Rev. ... This article refers to the Commonwealths concept of the monarchys legal authority. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Episcopacy is the regime of church government by bishops (Lat. ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ...

King's College Hall, 1770

The American Revolution and the subsequent war were catastrophic for King's College. It suspended instruction in 1776, and remained so for eight years, beginning with the arrival of the Continental Army in the spring of that year and continuing with the military occupation of New York City by British troops until their departure in 1783. The college's library was looted and its sole building requisitioned for use as a military hospital first by American and then British forces. Additionally, many of the college's alumni, primarily Loyalists, fled to Canada or Great Britain in the war's aftermath, leaving its future governance and financial status in question. Kings College (Columbia University) 1770 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Kings College (Columbia University) 1770 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... This article is about military actions only. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Evacuation Day on November 25 marks the day in 1783 when the last vestige of British authority in the United States — its troops in New York — departed from Manhattan. ... Britannia offers solace and a promise of compensation for her exiled American born Loyalists. ...


Although the college had been considered a bastion of Tory sentiment, it nevertheless managed to produce many key leaders of the Revolutionary generation - individuals later instrumental in the college's revival. Among the early King's College students had been John Jay, who negotiated the Treaty of Paris between the United States and Great Britain, ending the Revolutionary War, and who later became the first Chief Justice of the United States; Alexander Hamilton, military aide to General George Washington, author of most of the Federalist Papers, and the first Secretary of the Treasury; Gouverneur Morris, the author of the final draft of the United States Constitution; and Robert R. Livingston, a member of the five-man committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence. . For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Jay, see John Jay (disambiguation). ... Painting by Benjamin West depicting (from left to right) John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial... Alexander Hamilton (November 20, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was the first Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, political economist,] financier, and political theorist. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... An advertisement for The Federalist The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Gouverneur Morris Gouverneur Morris (January 31, 1752 – November 6, 1816) was an American statesman who represented Pennsylvania in the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and was an author of large sections of the Constitution of the United States. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to...

Arguably King's College's most famous alum, Alexander Hamilton (shown here as a young man)

Hamilton's first experience with the military came while a student during the summer of 1775, after the outbreak of fighting at Boston. Along with Nicholas Fish, Robert Troup, and a group of other students from King's he joined a volunteer militia company called the "Hearts of Oak" – Hamilton achieving the rank of Lieutenant. They adopted distinctive uniforms, complete with the words "Liberty or Death" on their hatbands, and drilled under the watchful eye of a former British officer in the graveyard of the nearby St. Paul's Chapel. In August 1775, while under fire from the HMS Asia, the Hearts of Oak (a.k.a. the "Corsicans") participated in a successful raid to seize cannon from the Battery, becoming an artillery unit thereafter. Ironically, in 1776 Captain Hamilton would engage in and survive the Battle of Harlem Heights, which took place on and around the site that would become home to his Alma Mater over a century later, only to be - after his dueling death twenty-eight years later - entombed on the site of the first home for King's College in the Trinity Church yard. ImageMetadata File history File links Young_alexander_hamilton. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Young_alexander_hamilton. ... Nicholas Fish (1758-1833) was an American Revolutionary soldier, born in New York City. ... Robert Troup (1757–January 14, 1832) was a soldier, lawyer and jurist from New York. ... The Hearts of Oak (originally, The Corsicans) were a volunteer militia in the British colony of New York, formed c. ... St. ... Battery Park (to New Yorkers, The Battery) is a 21-acre (8. ... The Battle of Harlem Heights was a skirmish in the New York Campaign of the American Revolutionary War. ... Trinity Church Cemetery consists of three separate burial grounds associated with Trinity Church in Manhattan, New York, USA. The first was established in the Churchyard located at 74 Trinity Place at Wall Street and Broadway. ...


Early Columbia College: 1784-1857

DeWitt Clinton, transfer from Princeton
DeWitt Clinton, transfer from Princeton

Although the college had been discredited by its association with the Loyalist establishment prior to the war, the remaining alumni, including Hamilton and Jay, and especially the would-be governors of King's College, argued passionately for its reopening. Nevertheless, it was probably ultimately the fact that New York State governor George Clinton was forced to send his nephew DeWitt out of state for a college education (specifically, to the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University) that prompted local sentiment to favor the need of a local college to retain him, and a renewed King's, which could easily provide the necessary facilities, was the logical choice. In 1784, the school reopened as Columbia College, the romantically patriotic name meant to demonstrate its commitment to the new republic. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (460x625, 15 KB) Summary DeWitt Clinton, former Mayor of New York City and later Governor of New York State. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (460x625, 15 KB) Summary DeWitt Clinton, former Mayor of New York City and later Governor of New York State. ... DeWitt Clinton. ... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ... DeWitt Clinton. ... Columbia College is the main undergraduate college at Columbia University, situated on the universitys main campus of Morningside Heights in the Borough of Manhattan in the City of New York. ...


The nature of the reopening, however, made possible via the encouragements of Governor Clinton and the state legislature, ensured that Columbia College would be an institution as distinct as much in kind as in name. The new charter made no mention of the college's former Church of England affiliations. Its governance was to be handled by a board of Regents representing all the counties of New York State, with Governor Clinton as Chancellor. As a state asset under state control, Columbia was to become the basis for a statewide public education system.


As the state proved negligent in its funding of the institution, this arrangement became increasingly unsatisfactory for both. An expansion of the Regents to 20 New York City residents had placed Hamilton and Jay at the helm, and they, along with New York City mayor James Duane, argued for privatization of the college. In 1787 a new charter was adopted for the college, still in use today, granting power to a private board of Trustees. Samuel Johnson's son, William Samuel Johnson, became its president. James Duane (February 6, 1733–February 1, 1797) was a lawyer, jurist, and revolutionary leader from New York. ... For other persons named William Johnson, see William Johnson (disambiguation). ...

College Hall in the 1830s, expanded and refaced in the Greek Revival style

For a period in the 1790s, with New York City as the federal and state capital and the country under successive Federalist governments, a revived Columbia thrived under the auspices of Federalists such as Hamilton and Jay. George Washington, notably, attended the commencement of 1790, and nascent interest in legal education commenced under Professor James Kent. As the state and country transitioned to a considerably more Jeffersonian era, however, the college's good fortunes began to dry up. The primary difficulty was funding; the college, already receiving less from the state following its privatization, was beset with even more financial difficulties as hostile politicians took power and as new upstate colleges, particularly Hamilton and Union, lobbied effectively for subsidies. What Columbia did receive was Manhattan real estate, which would only later prove lucrative. Image File history File links 1830. ... Image File history File links 1830. ... Personal residence of Catherine the Great Greek Revival was a style of classical architecture which became fashionable in Europe in the 18th century, and in the United Kingdom and United States in the early 19th century. ... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party in the period 1792 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1830s. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... James Kent (1763-1847) James Kent (July 31, 1763–December 12, 1847), American jurist and legal scholar, was born at New York. ... Portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale in 1800. ... For other colleges with the same name, see Hamilton College (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Union College in New York. ...


Columbia's performance flagged for the remainder of the 19th century's first half. The law faculty never managed to thrive during this period, and in 1807 the medical school, hoping to arrest its decline, broke off to merge with the independent College of Physicians and Surgeons. Contention between students and faculty were highlighted by the "Riotous Commencement" of 1811, in which students violently protested the faculty's decision not to confer a degree upon John Stevenson, who had inserted objectionable words into his commencement speech. Though the college was finally able to shake its embarrassing reputation for structural shabbiness by adding several wings to College Hall and refinishing it in the more fashionable Greek Revival style, the effort failed to halt Columbia's long-term downturn, and was soon overshadowed by the Gibbs Affair of 1854, in which famed chemistry professor Oliver Wolcott Gibbs was denied a professorship at the college, from which he had graduated, due to his Unitarian affiliation. The event demonstrated to many, including frustrated diarist and trustee George Templeton Strong, the narrow-mindedness of the institution. By July, 1854 the Christian Examiner of Boston, in an article entitled "The Recent Difficulties at Columbia College", noted that the school was "good in classics" yet "weak in sciences", and had "very few distinguished graduates".[12] Personal residence of Catherine the Great Greek Revival was a style of classical architecture which became fashionable in Europe in the 18th century, and in the United Kingdom and United States in the early 19th century. ... Oliver Wolcott Gibbs (February 21, 1822 - December 9, 1908), United States chemist, was born at New York. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Famous primarily for the 2,250 page diary he left behind upon his death, George Templeton Strong was born in New York in 1820 to moderate privilege, and lived to write intimately of the turbulent years leading up to and through the American Civil War, as well as the corrupt...


Expansion and the move to Madison Avenue

The Gothic Revival Law School building on the Madison Avenue campus
The Gothic Revival Law School building on the Madison Avenue campus

In 1857, the College moved from Park Place to a primarily Gothic Revival campus on 49th Street and Madison Avenue, where it remained for the next fifty years. The transition to the new campus coincided with a new outlook for the college; during the commencement of that year, College President Charles King proclaimed Columbia "a university". During the last half of the nineteenth century, under the leadership of President F.A.P. Barnard, the institution rapidly assumed the shape of a true modern university. Columbia Law School was founded in 1858, and in 1864 the School of Mines, the country's first such institution and the precursor to today's Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, was established. Barnard College for women, established by the eponymous Columbia president, was established in 1889; the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons came under the aegis of the University in 1891, followed by Teachers College, Columbia University in 1893. The Graduate Faculties in Political Science, Philosophy, and Pure Science awarded its first PhD in 1875.[12][13] This period also witnessed the inauguration of Columbia's participation in intercollegiate sports, with the creation of the baseball team in 1867, the organization to the football team in 1870, and the creation of a crew team by 1873. The first intercollegiate Columbia football game was a 6-3 loss to Rutgers. The Columbia Daily Spectator began publication during this period as well, in 1877.[14] Image File history File links Columbia_law_madison. ... Image File history File links Columbia_law_madison. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City which carries northbound one-way traffic. ... Charles Dunbar Burgess King (1875 - 1961) was a politician in Liberia. ... Frederick Augustus Porter Barnard (May 5, 1809 - April 27, 1889), American scientist and educationalist, was born in Sheffield, Massachusetts, on the 5th of May 1809. ... Columbia Law School, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States. ... A school of mines that forms part of Columbia University, New York City. ... The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (popularly known as SEAS) is a school of Columbia University which awards degrees in engineering, applied physics and applied mathematics. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... Seal of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons The Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, abbreviated P&S, is a graduate school of Columbia University located on the health sciences campus in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. ... Teachers College, Columbia University (sometimes referred to simply as Teachers College; also referred to as Teachers College of Columbia University or the Columbia University Graduate School of Education) is a top ranked graduate school of education in the United States. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Rutgers University Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is located in New Brunswick, Piscataway, Camden and Newark, New Jersey. ... Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily newspaper, written by Columbia University undergraduates, servicing the university community and the neighborhood of Morningside Heights. ...

Morningside Heights

Development of the Morningside Heights campus by 1915
Development of the Morningside Heights campus by 1915

In 1896, the trustees officially authorized the use of yet another new name, Columbia University, and today the institution is officially known as "Columbia University in the City of New York." Additionally, the engineering school was renamed the "School of Mines, Engineering and Chemistry." At the same time, University president Seth Low moved the campus again, from 49th Street to its present location, a more spacious (and, at the time, more rural) campus in the developing neighborhood of Morningside Heights. The site was formerly occupied by the Bloomingdale Insane Asylum. One of the asylum's buildings, the warden's cottage (later known as East Hall and Buell Hall), is still standing today. Columbia University, New York City, scanned from 1915 postcard This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Seth Low, born in Brooklyn, New York, (January 18, 1850 - September 17, 1916) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... Morningside Heights is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City and is bound by the Upper West Side, Morningside Park, Harlem, and Riverside Park (some now consider it part of the Upper West Side). ...


The building often depicted as emblematic of Columbia is the centerpiece of the Morningside Heights campus, Low Memorial Library. Constructed in 1895, the building is still referred to as "Low Library" although it has not functioned as a library since 1934. It currently houses the offices of the President and Provost, the Visitor's Center, the Trustees' Room and Columbia Security. Patterned on several precursors, including the Parthenon and the Pantheon, it is surmounted by the largest all-granite dome in the United States.[15] Low Library The Low Memorial Library is the administrative centre of Columbia University. ... For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... Facade of the Pantheon The Pantheon (Latin Pantheon[1], from Greek Πάνθεον Pantheon, meaning Temple of all the gods) is a building in Rome which was originally built as a temple to the seven deities of the seven planets in the state religion of Ancient Rome. ...

Under the leadership of Low's successor, Nicholas Murray Butler, Columbia rapidly became the nation's major institution for research, setting the "multiversity" model that later universities would adopt. On the Morningside Heights campus, Columbia centralized on a single campus the College, the School of Law, the Graduate Faculties, the School of Mines (predecessor of the Engineering School), and the College of Physicians & Surgeons. Butler went on to serve as president of Columbia for over four decades and became a giant in American public life (as one-time vice presidential candidate and a Nobel Laureate). His introduction of "downtown" business practices in university administration led to innovations in internal reforms such as the centralization of academic affairs, the direct appointment of registrars, deans, provosts, and secretaries, as well as the formation of a professionalized university bureaucracy, unprecedented among American universities at the time. Low Plaza c1905 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Low Plaza c1905 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Low Library The Low Memorial Library is the administrative centre of Columbia University. ... Nicholas Murray Butler Nicholas Murray Butler (April 2, 1862 – December 7, 1947) was an American philosopher, diplomat, and educator. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ...

Low Library.
Low Library.

In 1893 the Columbia University Press was founded in order to "promote the study of economic, historical, literary, scientific and other subjects; and to promote and encourage the publication of literary works embodying original research in such subjects." Among its publications are The Columbia Encyclopedia, first published in 1935, and The Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World, first published in 1952. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1824 × 1368 pixel, file size: 1,014 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Columbia University Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1824 × 1368 pixel, file size: 1,014 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Columbia University Metadata This file... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... The Columbia Encyclopedia is a one-volume encyclopedia produced by Columbia University Press and sold by the Gale Group. ...


In 1902, New York newspaper magnate Joseph Pulitzer donated a substantial sum to the University for the founding of a school to teach journalism. The result was the 1912 opening of the Graduate School of Journalism — the only journalism school in the Ivy League. The school is the administrator of the Pulitzer Prize and the duPont-Columbia Award in broadcast journalism. Joseph Pulitzer Joseph Pulitzer (April 18, 1847 – October 29, 1911) was a Hungarian-American publisher best known for posthumously establishing the Pulitzer Prizes and (along with William Randolph Hearst) for originating yellow journalism. ... The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is the only journalism school in the Ivy League; it awards the Pulitzer Prize and duPont-Columbia Award; co-sponsors the National Magazine Award and publishes the Columbia Journalism Review. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award is an American award that honors excellence in broadcast journalism. ...


In 1904 Columbia organized adult education classes into a formal program called Extension Teaching (later renamed University Extension). Courses in Extension Teaching eventually give rise to the Columbia Writing Program, the Columbia Business School, and the School of Dentistry and Oral Surgery. Columbia Business School (also known as CBS) is the business school of Columbia University in New York, New York. ...


Columbia Business School was added in the early 20th century. During the first half of the 20th Century Columbia and Harvard had the largest endowments in the US. Columbia Business School (also known as CBS) is the business school of Columbia University in New York, New York. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...

Archetypal Columbia man, from a 1902 poster
Archetypal Columbia man, from a 1902 poster

By the late 1930s, a Columbia student could study with the likes of Jacques Barzun, Paul Lazarsfeld, Mark Van Doren, Lionel Trilling, and I. I. Rabi. The University's graduates during this time were equally accomplished — for example, two alumni of Columbia's Law School, Charles Evans Hughes and Harlan Fiske Stone (who also held the position of Law School dean), served successively as Chief Justices of the United States. Dwight Eisenhower served as Columbia's president from 1948 until he became the President of the United States in 1953, although he spent the majority of his University presidency on leave as Supreme Commander of Allied forces in Europe during World War II. Image File history File links Columbiaman. ... Image File history File links Columbiaman. ... Jacques Martin Barzun (b. ... Image needed Paul Felix Lazarsfeld (1901-1976) was one of the major figures in 20th century American Sociology. ... Mark Van Doren (June 13, 1894 – December 10, 1972) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and critic. ... Lionel Trilling (July 4, 1905 – November 5, 1975) was an American literary critic, author, and teacher. ... Isidor Isaac Rabi (July 29, 1898 - January 11, 1988) was an American physicist of Austro-Hungarian origin. ... Charles Evans Hughes, Sr. ... Harlan Fiske Stone (October 11, 1872 – April 22, 1946) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as the dean of Columbia Law School, Attorney General of the United States, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and later Chief Justice of the United States. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Research into the atom by faculty members John R. Dunning, I. I. Rabi, Enrico Fermi and Polykarp Kusch placed Columbia's Physics Department in the international spotlight in the 1940s after the first nuclear pile was built to start what became the Manhattan Project[16]. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 1041 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Columbia University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 1041 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Columbia University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... The Thinker original sculpture at the Musée Rodin in Paris. ... Auguste Rodin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... John Ray Dunning (September 24, 1907 - August 25, 1975) was a US physicist who played a key role in the development of the atomic bomb. ... Fermi redirects here. ... Polykarp Kusch (January 26, 1911 - March 20, 1993) was a German-American physicist who, with Willis Eugene Lamb, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1955 for his accurate determination that the magnetic moment of the electron was greater than its theoretical value, thus leading to reconsideration of and... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ...


Following the end of World War II the School of International Affairs was founded in 1946. Focusing on developing diplomats and foreign affairs specialists the school began by offering the Master of International Affairs. To satisfy an increasing desire for skilled public service professionals at home and abroad, the School added the Master of Public Administration degree in 1977. In 1981 the School was renamed the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA). The School introduced an MPA in Environmental Science and Policy in 2001 and, in 2004, SIPA inaugurated its first doctoral program — the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Sustainable Development. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... This article is about a journal. ... The Master of International Affairs is a Professional Masters degree. ... The Roman civil service in action. ... The Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree is one of several master level professional public affairs degrees that provides training in public policy and project/program implementation (more recently known as public management). ... The School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) of Columbia University is a public policy school and one of the most prestigious schools of international affairs and/or public affairs in the United States, and internationally. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... Environmental policy is any (course of) action delibaretely taken (or not taken) to manage human activities with a view to prevent, reduce or mitigate harmful effects on nature and natural resources, and ensuring that man-made changes to the environment do not have harmful effects on humans [1]. // It is... Sustainable development is a socio-ecological process characterized by the fulfilment of human needs while maintaining the quality of the natural environment indefinitely. ...


In 1947, to meet the needs of GIs returning from World War II, University Extension was reorganized as an undergraduate college and designated the Columbia University School of General Studies. While University Extension had granted the B.S. degree since 1921, the School of General Studies first granted the B.A. degree in 1968. GI or G.I. is a term describing a member of the US armed forces or an item of their equipment. ... The School of General Studies, commonly known as General Studies or simply GS, is Columbia Universitys undergraduate college for non-traditional students. ...


Columbia College first admitted women in the fall of 1983 after a decade of failed negotiations with Barnard College, an all female institution affiliated with the University, to merge the two schools. Barnard College still remains affiliated with Columbia and all Barnard graduates are issued diplomas authorized by both Columbia and Barnard.


In 1990 the Faculty of Arts & Sciences was created, unifying the faculties of Columbia College, the School of General Studies, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and the School of International and Public Affairs.


In 1997, the Columbia Engineering School was renamed the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, in honor of Chinese businessman Z. Y. Fu, who gave Columbia $26 million. The school is now referred to as "SEAS" or simply, "the engineering school." The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (popularly known as SEAS) is a school of Columbia University which awards degrees in engineering, applied physics and applied mathematics. ...

Earl Hall
Earl Hall

As of April 2007, the university had purchased more than two-thirds of 17 acres desired for a new campus in Manhattanville, to the north of the Morningside Heights campus. Stretching from 125th Street to 133rd Street, the new campus would house buildings for Columbia's schools of business and the arts and allow the construction of the Jerome L. Greene Center for Mind, Brain, and Behavior, where research will occur on neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.[17] The $7 billion expansion plan includes demolishing all buildings, except three that are historically significant, eliminating the existing light industry and storage warehouses, and relocating tenants in 132 apartments. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... 125th Street station at Broadway and 125th Street, one of Manhattanvilles primary landmarks Manhattanville is the part of Manhattan in New York City bordered on the south by Morningside Heights on the west by the Hudson river, on the east by Harlem and on the north by Hamilton Heights...


The project has suffered from criticism of a lack of transparency and concern for community needs. According to the Environmental Impact Statement recently certified by the Department of City Planning, almost 300 people would be displaced from the project zone, and almost 3,300 would be displaced from areas surrounding it. Community activist groups in West Harlem have committed to fighting the expansion.[18] Despite a constant barrage of opposition at a series of public hearings, the City Council of New York green-lighted Columbia's Manhattanville expansion plan on December 19th, 2007, after receiving strong support from Councilman Robert Jackson (D-West Harlem) and Councilwoman Inez Dickens (D-Central Harlem). Critics accuse the university of having used its political muscle to silence dissent.


On April 11, 2007, Columbia University announced a $400m to $600m donation from media billionaire John Kluge[19] to be used exclusively for financial aid. The donation is among the largest single gifts to higher education. Its exact value will depend on the eventual value of Kluge's estate at the time of his death. John Werner Kluge (born September 21, 1914) is an entrepreneur who was born in Chemnitz, Germany, best known as a television industry mogul in the United States. ...


Academics

Admissions and financial aid

Van Am Quad
Van Am Quad

In 2008, Columbia College admitted 8.7% of applicants for the Class of 2012, one of the lowest rates in the country.[20] The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Sciences admitted 17.6%, a record for the School.[20] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (655x766, 236 KB) Van Amridge Quadrangle, Columbia University File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Columbia College of Columbia University ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (655x766, 236 KB) Van Amridge Quadrangle, Columbia University File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Columbia College of Columbia University ...


Columbia is also a diverse school, with approximately 49% of all students identifying themselves as persons of color. Additionally, over 50% of all undergraduates in the Class of 2011 will be receiving financial aid. The average financial aid package for these students exceeds $27,000, with an average grant size of over $20,000.[20]


Organization and rankings

Organization

Its undergraduate schools are Columbia College (CC), the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), and, for students who want to begin or resume their education after one or more years of interruption, the School of General Studies (GS). Also affiliated with Columbia is Barnard College, an all women's institution. The university has numerous graduate schools, the most notable of which include the Columbia Law School, the Graduate School of Business (Columbia Business School or CBS), the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (Columbia's medical school), Columbia University School of Nursing, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia College of Dental Medicine, the Graduate School of Journalism (J-School or CJS), the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP), the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS), the Columbia University School of the Arts (SoA), Columbia University School of Social Work, and Teachers College (the Graduate School of Education of Columbia University). Some graduate students also attend the engineering school. Columbia University's School of Continuing Education offers classes for non-matriculated elective course students, Master of Science Degrees, Postbaccalaureate Certificates, English Language Programs, Overseas Programs, Summer Session, and High School Programs. Columbia College is the main undergraduate college at Columbia University, situated on the universitys main campus of Morningside Heights in the Borough of Manhattan in the City of New York. ... The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (popularly known as SEAS) is a school of Columbia University which awards degrees in engineering, applied physics and applied mathematics. ... The School of General Studies, commonly known as General Studies or simply GS, is Columbia Universitys undergraduate college for non-traditional students. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... Columbia Law School, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States. ... Columbia Business School (also known as CBS) is the business school of Columbia University in New York, New York. ... Seal of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons The Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, abbreviated P&S, is a graduate school of Columbia University located on the health sciences campus in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. ... The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is the only journalism school in the Ivy League; it awards the Pulitzer Prize and duPont-Columbia Award; co-sponsors the National Magazine Award and publishes the Columbia Journalism Review. ... The School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) of Columbia University is a public policy school and one of the most prestigious schools of international affairs and/or public affairs in the United States, and internationally. ... Columbia University, legally known as Columbia University in the City of New York, and incorporated under the name Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York, is an Ivy League university located in New York City. ... The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Columbia University (also known as GSAS) is the branch of the university that grants academic degrees, including M.A.s and Ph. ... The Columbia University School of the Arts , also known simply as the School of the Arts or as SoA, is the division of the university that offers Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degrees in Film, Visual Arts, Theatre Arts, and Writing. ... The Columbia University School of Social Work is a professional program within Columbia University. ... Teachers College, Columbia University (sometimes referred to simply as Teachers College; also referred to as Teachers College of Columbia University or the Columbia University Graduate School of Education) is a top ranked graduate school of education in the United States. ... The School of Continuing Education offers courses in over 50 subject in the Arts and Sciences, applied professional masters degrees, the Postbaccalaureate Studies Program for graduate school preparation and professional or personal advancement, and high school programs for enrichment or college credit. ...


Rankings

Pupin Hall, the physics building, showing the rooftop observatory

U.S. University Rankings Image File history File links Pupin_hall. ... Image File history File links Pupin_hall. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...

USNWR National University[21] 9th
USNWR Business School[22] 9th
USNWR Law School[23] 4th
USNWR Medical School (research) [24] 10th
USNWR Engineering School[25] 19th
USNWR Education School[26] 4th
ARWU World[27] 7th
ARWU National[28] 6th
ARWU Natural Science & Math[29] 12th
ARWU Engineering & CS[30] 43rd
ARWU Life Sciences[31] 7th
ARWU Clinical Medicine[32] 5th
ARWU Social Sciences[33] 3rd
THES World[34] 11th
THES National[35] 7th
CMUP[36] 1st
Washington Monthly[37] 41st

The undergraduate school of Columbia University is ranked 9th (tied with The University of Chicago) among national universities by U.S. News and World Report (USNWR),[38] 7th among world universities and 6th among universities in the Americas by Shanghai Jiao Tong University,[39] 11th among world universities and 7th in North America by the THES - QS World University Rankings,[40] 41st among national universities by The Washington Monthly,[41] 10th among "global universities" by Newsweek,[42] and in the 1st tier among national universities by The Center for Measuring University Performance.[43] According to the National Research Council, graduate programs are ranked 8th nationally. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The THES - QS World University Rankings is an annual publication of university rankings around the world, published by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The National Research Council (NRC) of the USA is the working arm of the United States National Academy of Sciences and the United States National Academy of Engineering, carrying out most of the studies done in their names. ...


Columbia also participates in the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)'s University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN). Founded in 1976, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) is an organization of private US colleges and universities. ... The University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN) is a network planned to compare private colleges and universities across a wide variety of characteristics. ...


Graduate and professional schools of Columbia University are among the best in the US with most of them ranking among the top 10 programs in the country. According to the U.S. News & World Report,[44]The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, home to the Pulitzer Prize, ranks #1. Teachers College (Columbia's Graduate School of Education) ranks #1. School of Social Work ranks #3. The Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) ranks #3 (according to Architect magazine's November 2007 issue). Columbia Law School ranks #4. The Mailman School of Public Health ranks #6. Columbia Business School ranks #9 (#2 according to The Financial Times; #6 according to Fortune Magazine). Columbia's medical school, called the College of Physicians and Surgeons, ranks #10. According to Foreign Policy magazine, the School of International & Public Affairs (SIPA) PhD program (overall) in international relations is ranked #2, and the Master's program (policy area) is ranked #5. Finally, Columbia's Institute of Human Nutrition ranks #1 according to The Chronicle for Higher Education. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... Categories: Magazines stubs | Time Warner subsidiaries | Business magazines ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ...


Academic freedom

The University states that it "is committed to maintaining a climate of academic freedom," in which professors are given the "widest possible latitude in their teaching and scholarship."[45] Its policy on academic freedom prohibits the penalization by the University of a professor for expressions of opinion or associations in their private or civic capacity. [46]


In 2005, the University became embroiled in a controversy regarding the academic freedom of students in connection with their studies in the department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures ("MEALAC"). The students charged that MEALAC faculty showed an anti-Israel bias, with one student who was formerly with the Israeli Defense Forces charging that a professor, Joseph Massad, refused to answer his question until he "revealed how many Palestinians he had killed."[47] The professor denied that the incident took place.[47] A group called "The David Project"[48] produced a documentary entitled Columbia Unbecoming in which the charges were made.[47] In response, President Bollinger convened an ad hoc panel to investigate the incidents described in the film and established a standing panel and grievance procedure for future claims of student intimidation.[47]


High School Programs

Columbia offers a program called the Columbia University Science Honors Program, which is a program that caters to high school students (sophomores, juniors, and seniors). The program is highly competitive, admitting about one-sixth of applicants who are selected based on their transcripts, student-written essays, a teacher recommendation, and a three-hour science and math test. It offers college-level courses in science and math every Saturday during the academic year.


Life

The geography of student life

Alma Mater

Main article: Alma Mater (New York sculpture)

This name refers to a statue on the steps (see below) of Low Memorial Library by sculptor Daniel Chester French. There is a small owl "hidden" on the sculpture. Alma Mater is also the subject of many Columbia legends. The main legends include that the first student in the freshmen class to find the hidden owl on the statue will be valedictorian, and that any subsequent Barnard student who finds it will marry a Columbia man, seeing as how Barnard is a women's college. Low Library The Low Memorial Library is the administrative centre of Columbia University. ... Daniel Chester French Signature, Daniel Chester French (April 20, 1850 – October 7, 1931) was an American sculptor. ... In higher education, particularly in the United States, a womens college is a college (that is, a primarily undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institution) whose students are exclusively women. ...


Butler Library

Main article: Butler Library

The main library, packed during midterms and finals weeks, is composed of three main parts: the stacks, the study rooms, and the cafe. Students are known to leave their belongings as a placeholder for days on end, a few only leaving the library to sleep a few hours while others come and go as they please. During finals, to get a spot at Butler, students wake up early in the morning and compete with others for a seat. Some students are reported to have gone so far as to set up offices in disused sections of the library on the ninth floor. Butler houses 1.9 million of the university's 9.2 million volumes,[49] mostly in the humanities and history. Unlike the libraries of most other schools, Butler remains at least partially open 24 hours a day and acts as a center of late night studying. Butler also houses Columbia University's Rare Books and Manuscripts Library (including the Columbiana University Archives), the Philip L. Milstein Undergraduate Library, the Oral History collection, and the Butler Media Collection. Butler Library is one of two dozen libraries on campus, mostly distinguished by subject disciplines.[50] Butler Library The Nicholas Murray Butler Library, commonly known simply as Butler Library, is the largest single library in the Columbia University Library System, which contains over 8. ...


Residence halls

First-year students usually live in one of the residence halls situated around South Lawn: Hartley, Wallach, John Jay, Furnald or Carman. Upperclass students may also live in Hartley and Wallach, which are collectively part of the Living and Learning Center (LLC), through a highly selective application process. Other upperclassmen participate in a housing lottery. Rising sophomores may also live in Furnald Hall, depending on the lottery results. The other upperclassmen students can choose, depending on their luck, among Broadway, East Campus, 47 Claremont, Hogan, McBain Hall, River Hall, Ruggles Hall, Schapiro, 600 W 113th, Watt Hall, Wien Hall, and Woodbridge Hall. Most students consider a townhouse in East Campus the best suite style housing option, which includes two-story suites for six students including a kitchen, common lounge, large single rooms, and a quiet location. A four or five person suite in Hogan, in which each person lives in a single and the suite shares a full kitchen, bathroom and living room, is also considered excellent housing, as its location is near many restaurants on Broadway and much closer to the subway than East Campus. Very lucky seniors with the best lottery numbers can get their own studio apartment in Watt. Hartley Hall was the first official residence hall (or dormitory) constructed on the campus of Columbia University, and currently houses undergraduate students from Columbia College as well as the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science. ... Wallach Hall is the second oldest residence hall (or dormitory) on the campus of Columbia University, and currently houses undergraduate students from Columbia College as well as the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science. ... John Jay Hall is a prominent 15-story building located on the southeastern extremity of the Morningside Heights campus of Columbia University in the City of New York, on the northwestern corner of 114th St. ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... East Campus is a prominent building on the Morningside Heights campus of Columbia University in New York City, located along Morningside Drive between 117th and 118th Streets. ... Hogan Hall is primarily a dormitory of Columbia University reserved for fourth-year undergraduate students (seniors). ... Morris A. Schapiro Hall is an undergraduate residence hall located at Columbia University. ... For other uses, see Watt (disambiguation). ...


The Steps

"The Steps", alternatively known as "Low Steps" or the "Urban Beach", are a popular meeting area and hangout for Columbia students. The term refers to the long series of granite steps leading from the lower part of campus (South Field) to its upper terrace, atop which sits Low Memorial Library, as well as adjacent areas, including Low Plaza and small nearby lawns. On warm days, particularly in the spring, the steps become crowded with students conversing, reading, or sunbathing. Occasionally, they play host to film screenings and concerts. The King's Crown Shakespeare Troupe annually performs an outdoor play by "the Bard", in which the Steps frequently play a prominent role. The design of the steps are modeled after the architecture in Raphael's "The School of Athens," a fresco in the Vatican. Low Library The Low Memorial Library is the administrative centre of Columbia University. ...


Sundial

The sundial as it originally appeared prior to the removal of the granite sphere
The sundial as it originally appeared prior to the removal of the granite sphere

This elevated stone pedestal at the center of the main campus quadrangle now serves as a podest for various speeches. Originally there was a large granite sphere located upon the pedestal, which would mark the time via its shadow. It sat upon the pedestal from approximately 1914 to 1946. It was removed in that year due to cracks that formed within it. The ball was assumed destroyed for 55 years until it was discovered intact in a Michigan field in 2001. As of 2006, it seems unlikely that the sundial will ever be restored to a working state.[51] Image File history File linksMetadata Columbiasundial. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Columbiasundial. ...

Tunnels

Columbia University has an extensive underground tunnel system dating back more than a century, with the oldest portions existing even before the present campus was constructed. Some of these tunnels are open to students today, while others have been closed off to the public. A map of the Columbia University tunnels Columbia University has an extensive tunnel system connecting most buildings on campus and acting as conduits for steam, electricity, telecommunications, and other infrastructure. ...


Online

In recent years, new outlets for Columbia student life have opened online. Some, such as the Bwog,[52] the blog of the undergraduate magazine The Blue and White and a medium for campus gossip, and the professor ratings site CULPA[53] (the Columbia Underground Listing of Professor Ability), have flourished. CULPA, established in 1997 and unaffiliated officially with the university, allows students to anonymously post their own reviews of their professors. It is regarded as one of the most useful tools for students looking to enroll in a class, boasting over 10,000 reviews. Because of the candid nature of the submissions, the site has occasionally been accused of harboring biased reviews and misrepresenting professors. Still, it is the main source of professor review currently available to the Columbia student body. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Blue & White is a Columbia University undergraduate literary magazine founded in 1890. ...


Students have launched a number of other, sometimes pioneering, websites. CU Community was a popular online networking website created by Adam Goldberg (SEAS ´06) containing 85% of the undergraduate student body, that later rebranded itself CampusNetwork and launched across several universities, before succumbing to its long-time competitor, Facebook. The Columbia Daily Spectator launched a blog called SpecBlogs,[54] but this has also since been shut down. Other ventures have been more successful. Carsplit, also created by Adam Goldberg (SEAS ´06), launched in 2005 as a way for students to split the cost of taking a taxi to the airport. Usage peaks during winter break where, last year, over 1,000 students used the service. CU Snacks, authored by Brandon Arbiter (SEAS ´06) was one of the first online, late night snack delivery services. It started from Wien Residence Hall in 2004 and, although it remains completely student-run, it is now part of the experiential education program of Columbia's Center for Career Education. A more recent launch was WikiCU,[55], created by the Engineering Student Council, which serves as an information resource and insider's guide to the university and neighborhood. It is the manifestation of a long-time project to start a wiki, called Project Athena. Facebook is a social networking website that was launched on February 4, 2004. ... Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily newspaper, written by Columbia University undergraduates, servicing the university community and the neighborhood of Morningside Heights. ...


Clubs and activities

Publications

Major publications include the Columbia Daily Spectator, the nation's second-oldest student newspaper;[56] the Columbia Current,[57] a journal of politics, culture and Jewish Affairs; The Columbian, the second oldest collegiate yearbook in the nation; Columbia Review,[58] the nation's oldest college literary magazine; The Columbia Journal of Literary Criticism;[59] The Columbia Observer; the Columbia Science Review, the Columbia Political Review,[60] the multi-partisan political magazine of the Columbia Political Union; The Fed[61] a triweekly satire and investigative newspaper; Jester of Columbia,[62] the newly (and frequently) revived campus humor magazine; The Blue and White,[63] a literary magazine established in 1890 that has recently begun to foray into in-depth pieces on campus life and politics; and the Journal of Politics & Society,[64] a journal of undergraduate research in the social sciences, published by the Helvidius Group. Columbia also has an online arts and literary web magazine, The Mobius Strip.[65] AdHoc,[66] denotes itself as the "progressive" campus magazine; it deals largely with local political issues and arts events. Another group of undergraduates started The Current,[67] a journal of politics, culture, and Jewish affairs. The Birch,[68] Columbia's undergraduate journal of Eastern European and Eurasian culture, is the first national student-run undergraduate journal of its kind. Professional journals published by academic departments at Columbia University include Current Musicology[69] and The Journal of Philosophy.[70] The Science Review is the University's only science magazine that prints hard copies; it prints general interest articles, faculty profiles and student research papers. During the spring semester, graduate students in the Journalism School publish The Bronx Beat,a bi-weekly newspaper covering the South Bronx. Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily newspaper, written by Columbia University undergraduates, servicing the university community and the neighborhood of Morningside Heights. ... Cover of the Columbia Political Review from March 2006 The Columbia Political Review is Columbia Universitys undergraduate multi-partisan political magazine. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Jester of Columbia cover from April, 2006 The Jester of Columbia, or simply the Jester , is a humor magazine at Columbia University in New York City. ... The Blue & White is a Columbia University undergraduate literary magazine founded in 1890. ... The 2005 cover of the Journal of Politics & Society The Journal of Politics & Society is an academic journal of the social sciences published annually by undergraduate members of the Helvidius Group. ... Category: ... The Birch is a national undergraduate journal of Eastern European and Eurasian culture. ... The Journal of Philosophy is a well-known philosophical journal published from Columbia University. ...


Broadcasting

Columbia is home to two pioneers in undergraduate student broadcasting, WKCR-FM and CTV.


WKCR, the student run radio station broadcasts to the Tri-State area and claims to be the oldest FM radio station in the world, owing to the University's affiliation with Major Edwin Armstrong. The station currently has its studios on the second floor of Alfred Lerner Hall on the Morningside campus with its main transmitter tower at 4 Times Square in Midtown Manhattan. WKCR is a college radio station in New York City. ... Edwin Howard Armstrong (December 18, 1890 – January 31, 1954) was an American electrical engineer and inventor. ...


Columbia Television (CTV)[71] is the nation's second oldest student television station and home of CTV News,[72] a weekly live news program produced by undergraduate students. CTV transmits a cablecast and webcast from its studio in Alfred Lerner Hall.


Speech and debate

The Philolexian Society is a literary and debating club founded in 1802, making it the oldest student group at Columbia, as well as the third oldest collegiate literary society in the country. It has many famous alumni, and administers the Joyce Kilmer Bad Poetry Contest (see below). The Philolexian Society of Columbia University is one of the oldest collegiate literary societies in the United States, and the oldest student group at Columbia. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ...


The Columbia University Mock Trial Program[73] was founded in 1998. It fields four teams that compete in tournaments across the country under the umbrella American Mock Trial Association (AMTA).[74] In recent years the Columbia Mock Trial Program has won tournaments at Northwestern University, George Washington University, Yale University, UCLA, as well as three Northeast Regional Titles. The Columbia program is one of the best in the country, ranked in the Top-Ten since 2003 and peaking at the Number 2 ranking in 2004. In 2005-2006, Columbia Mock Trial had one team finish 5th Place at the National Tournament in St. Petersburg, FL and one team finish 6th Place at the National Championship Tournament in Des Moines, Iowa. Every year Columbia hosts the Columbia University Big Apple Invitational Tournament (CUBAIT), one of the best invitational tournaments in the nation. CUBAIT annually attracts many of the top twenty teams in the nation. Northwestern University (NU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ... Yale redirects here. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the...


The Columbia Model United Nations holds several functions. Its traveling team competes in conferences both domestically and internationally and is considered one of the top Model United Nations teams in the country. It also holds the Columbia Model United Nations Conference and Exposition (CMUNCE),[75] an annual high school international affairs conference, founded in 2001 by Erica DeBruin. The conference is known for its crisis-oriented committees and the comparatively small committee size. Columbia Model United Nations in New York (CMUNNY]),[76] is a small crisis-oriented Model United Nations conference for college students that prides itself in non-conventional committees. It was founded in 2006 by David Coates. A Model United Nations Conference in Stuttgart, Germany in action. ...


The Columbia Parliamentary Debate Team,[77] competes in tournaments around the country as part of the American Parliamentary Debate Association, and hosts both high school and college tournaments on Columbia's campus, as well as public debates on issues affecting the university. The American Parliamentary Debate Association (APDA) is the oldest intercollegiate parliamentary debating association in the United States, and one of two in the nation overall, the other being the National Parliamentary Debate Association (NPDA). ...


Greek life

Columbia University is home to many fraternities, sororities, and co-educational Greek organizations. Approximately 10-15% of undergraduate students are associated with Greek life.[78] There has been a Greek presence on campus since the establishment in 1842 of the Lambda Chapter of Psi Upsilon. Today, there are thirteen NIC fraternities on the campus. The prominent fraternities at Columbia include: The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Psi Upsilon (ΨΥ, Psi U) is the fifth oldest college fraternity, founded at Union College in 1833. ... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ...

In addition, there are four NPC sororities on campus: Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... Delta Sigma Phi (ΔΣΦ, also known as DSPor Delta Sigs or Delt Sigs or D-Sigs) is a fraternity established at the City College of New York in 1899 and is a charter member of the North-American Interfraternity Conference. ... Psi Upsilon (ΨΥ, Psi U) is the fifth oldest college fraternity, founded at Union College in 1833. ... Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 116 chapters and 5 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ZBT redirects here. ... Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... The Zeta Psi Fraternity of North America Inc. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... St. ... The National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), founded in 1902, is an umbrella organization for 26 inter/national womens sororities. ...

There are also various multicultural Greek organizations, including: Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Sigma Delta Tau (ΣΔΤ), a national sorority and member of the National Panhellenic Conference, was founded March 25, 1917 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. ... Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ...

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Flower: Orchid Gem: Diamond Mascot: Phoenix Motto: Sisterhood, Service & Cultural Diversity Homepage: http://www. ... ΛΦΕ (Lambda Phi Epsilon, also known as Lambdas, LPhiE, LFE) is a nationally-recognized Asian-interest fraternity based in the United States. ... Sigma Iota Alpha Sorority(ΣΙΑ), (official name is ) is a Latino oriented Greek letter intercollegiate sorority founded on April 29, 1990 by students from [[University at Albany |SUNY Albany]], SUNY Stony Brook, SUNY New Paltz, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. ... Lambda Pi Chi Sorority(ΛΠΧ) () is a U.S.-based Latina based Greek letter intercollegiate sorority founded on April 16, 1988 at Cornell University. ...

Entrepreneurship at Columbia

The Columbia University Organization of Rising Entrepreneurs (CORE) was founded in 1999. The student-run group aims to foster entrepreneurship on campus. Each year CORE hosts dozens of events, including a business plan competition and a series of seminars. Recent seminar speakers include Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks and Chairman of HDNet, and Blake Ross, creator of Mozilla Firefox. As of 2006, CORE has awarded graduate and undergraduate students with over $100,000 in seed capital. Events are possible through the contributions of various private and corporate groups; previous sponsors include Deloitte & Touche, Citigroup, and i-Compass. There are currently over 2,000 members in CORE. The organization is governed by its executive board, which comprises fifteen undergraduates.


Other

The Columbia University Asian American Alliance (AAA or triple-A) has recently become one of the most active Asian American student organizations in the nation and one of the largest student organizations at Columbia. In the past three years of growth, AAA has founded the regional NYC Asian American student conference and a national daily blog on Asian American issues called TheBlaaag. With three subcommittees that specialize in social life, political issues, and community service, AAA works on a variety of issues including addressing hate crimes and bias incidents, large scale event programming, social networking, workshops, and collaborating with the greater community at Columbia.


Black Students Organization [8] The Columbia University Black Students Organization is one of the oldest and most active organizations of its kind in the nation. Dating back to as early as 1964, the BSO still remains an active force on the Columbia University campus. It runs one of the few student operated safe spaces on campus, the Malcolm X Lounge which can be found in 106 Hartley Hall.


The Columbia University Orchestra was founded by composer Edward MacDowell in 1896, and is the oldest continually operating university orchestra in the United States.[9]


Columbia Community Outreach (CCO) is a student organized, student run service day that promotes community service on campus. Founded in 1997, CCO is a community service initiative that seeks to bring together the Columbia University community, raise awareness of opportunities for long-term service and to form mutually beneficial relationships with Columbia's neighboring communities. Every year over 1,000 students, faculty, staff and alumni volunteer for a day alongside community members and non-profit organizations, such as the New York City Parks Department and Habitat for Humanity. [10]


Art History Underground, the student club for arts, organizes yearly events such as roundtables, panels and discussions. The first traditional "What is Art History?" roundtable took place in October, 2006 with the support of the Art History Department. The club also has a biannual journal with the same name, whose first issue was printed in late Fall, 2006. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


The Columbia Queer Alliance is the central Columbia student organization that represents the lesbian, gay, transgender, and questioning student population. It is the oldest gay student organization in the world, founded as the Student Homophile League in 1966 by students including lifelong activist Stephen Donaldson.[11] The Columbia Queer Alliance, the oldest LGBTQ student organization in the world, is the central Columbia University student organization that represents the lesbian, gay, transgender, and questioning student population. ... Cover of French homophile literary journal Arcadie, 1975 The word homophile is an alternative to the word homosexual, preferred by some because it emphasizes love (-phile from Greek φιλία) over sex. ... Stephen Reeder Donaldson (born May 13, 1947) is an American fantasy and science fiction novelist. ...


Conversio Virium is the college's student-run BDSM education and discussion group, providing Columbia students with a safe, confidential space to discuss BDSM activities and interests. It is the oldest still-running University group of its kind, recently celebrating its ten-year anniversary.[12] Conversio Virium (CV), the oldest university student-run BDSM discussion group in the United States, is the central Columbia University student organization that represents the colleges collective population who engage in consensual BDSM and related activities. ... Collars are a commonly used symbol of BDSM and can be ornamental or functional. ...


Columbia's Bhangra team "cuBhangra" is one of the most energetic and entertaining college, co-ed bhangra teams in the nation. Established in 2002, it has already secured placings at various bhangra competitions in the states and enjoys performing around New York City and in various on-campus performances. Bhangra is a lively form of music and dance that originated in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent in South Asia. ...


Columbia University campus military groups include the U.S. Military Veterans of Columbia University and Advocates for Columbia ROTC. In the 2005-06 academic year, the Columbia Military Society, Columbia's student group for ROTC cadets and Marine officer candidates, was renamed the Hamilton Society for "students who aspire to serve their nation through the military in the tradition of Alexander Hamilton".


There are a number of performing arts groups at Columbia dedicated to producing student theater, including King's Crown Shakespeare Troupe (KCST), Columbia Musical Theater Society (CMTS), New and Original Material Authored by Students (NOMADS), Columbia University Performing Arts League (CUPAL), Black Theatre Ensemble (BTE), sketch comedy group Chowdah, Columbia University Players, and improvisational troupes Fruit Paunch and Sweeps.


The Columbia University Muslim Students Association is one of the oldest and most active Muslim Students Associations in the country. The Muslim Student Association (MSA) is a group dedicated, by its own description, to Islamic societies on college campuses in Canada and the United States for the good of muslim students. ...


The largest undergraduate club on campus is the Columbia University College Democrats, who won College Democrats of America's Chapter of the Year award for the 2006-2007 school year.


Athletics

Main article: Columbia Lions

A member institution of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, Columbia fields varsity teams in 29 sports. The football Lions play home games at the 17,000-seat Lawrence A. Wien Stadium at Baker Field. One hundred blocks north of the main campus at Morningside Heights, the Baker Athletics Complex also includes facilities for baseball, softball, soccer, lacrosse, field hockey, tennis, track and rowing. The basketball, fencing, swimming & diving, volleyball and wrestling programs are based at the Dodge Physical Fitness Center on the main campus. // The Ivy League Columbia University, whose athletic teams go by the name lions, are part of the Ivy League, which includes Columbia, University of Pennsylvania, Cornell, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Lawrence A. Wien Stadium is a stadium located in Manhattan, New York. ...


The Columbia mascot is a lion named Roar-ee. At football games, the Columbia University Marching Band plays "Roar, Lion, Roar" each time the team scores and "Who Owns New York?" with each first down. At halftime, alumni stand and sing the alma mater, "Sans Souci."


The Lions boast a rich athletic tradition. The wrestling team is the oldest in the nation, and the football team was the third to join intercollegiate play. A Columbia crew was the first from outside Britain to win at the Henley Royal Regatta. Former students include baseball Hall of Famers Lou Gehrig and Eddie Collins and football Hall of Famer Sid Luckman. This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... A race taking place at Henley Regatta 2004 Henley Royal Regatta is a rowing event held every year on the river Thames by the town of Henley-on-Thames, England. ... The U.S. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is technically the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... Sid Luckman (November 21, 1916 - July 5, 1998) was an American football quarterback for the Chicago Bears from 1939 to 1950 leading the team to 4 NFL championships during that period. ...


More recently, Columbia has excelled at archery, cross country, fencing and wrestling. In 2000, Olympic gold medal swimmer Cristina Teuscher became the first Ivy League student to win the Honda-Broderick Cup, awarded to the best collegiate woman athlete in the nation. Other recent Lions include Pro Bowl defensive end Marcellus Wiley, whose success in the NFL is credited with drawing the attention of professional scouts back to the Ivy League.[citation needed] In 2007, the Men's Track Team captured the 4x800 Penn Relay's victory. This was the first time an Ivy League school won this race since 1974. Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... Swimming is the method by which humans (or other animals) move themselves through water. ... Cristina Teuscher (born March 12, 1978 in New Rochelle, New York) is a former freestyle and medley swimmer from the United States, who was a member of the Womens Relay Team that won the gold medal in the 4x200m Freestyle a the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Broderick Awards are voted on by a national panel of womens collegiate athletic directors. ... In professional American football, the Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). ... Marcellus Wiley nicknamed Dat Dude (born November 30, 1974 in Compton, California) is an American football player, a defensive end for the NFLs Jacksonville Jaguars. ...

"The Scholar's Lion," presented on Dean's Day, April 3, 2004, in honor of the 250th anniversary of Columbia College. A gift by sculptor Greg Wyatt, CC`71.
"The Scholar's Lion," presented on Dean's Day, April 3, 2004, in honor of the 250th anniversary of Columbia College. A gift by sculptor Greg Wyatt, CC`71.

Columbia became the third school in the United States to play intercollegiate football when it sent a squad to New Brunswick, N.J., in 1870 to play a team from Rutgers. Three years later, Columbia students joined representatives from Princeton, Rutgers and Yale to ratify the first set of rules to govern intercollegiate play. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1013 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Columbia University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1013 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Columbia University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Rutgers University Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is located in New Brunswick, Piscataway, Camden and Newark, New Jersey. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Yale redirects here. ...


During the first half of the 20th century, the Lions had consistent success on the gridiron. Under Hall of Fame coach Lou Little, the 1934 squad shut out heavily favored Stanford in the Rose Bowl winning what was the precursor to the national championship. During World War II football players were recruited to move uranium in support of the school's participation in the Manhattan Project. [79] Little’s 1947 edition beat defending national champion Army, then riding a 32-game win streak, in one of the most stunning upsets of the century. Greats of the era included the All-American Luckman, the quarterback who would lead the Chicago Bears to four NFL championships in the 1940s while ushering football into the modern era with the T formation. Lou Little (1893-?) was an American football coach. ... Stanford may refer: Stanford University Places: Stanford, Kentucky Stanford, California, home of Stanford University Stanford Shopping Center Stanford, New York, town in Dutchess County. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue and Orange Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National Football... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Since sharing their only Ivy League title with Harvard in 1961, the football Lions have had three winning seasons (6-3 in 1971, 5-4-1 in 1994 and 8-2 in 1996). The distance of practice facilities at Baker Athletics Complex from the main campus at Morningside Heights, competition for the attention of the student body with all the diversions that Manhattan has to offer, and the lack of a winning tradition sometimes are cited as challenges to recruiting at Columbia.[citation needed] Norries Wilson, a runner-up for national assistant coach of the year while at the University of Connecticut in 2004, is the latest head coach brought in to try to turn the program around. The 2006 squad had a 5-5 record (the program's first .500-or-better season in 10 years), with two victories to close out the year against Cornell and Brown. Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Morningside Heights is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City and is bound by the Upper West Side, Morningside Park, Harlem, and Riverside Park (some now consider it part of the Upper West Side). ... Norries Wilson became the first Columbia coach since 1957 to win his debut when the Lions beat Fordham in the 2006 Liberty Cup at Columbia. ... The University of Connecticut is the State of Connecticuts land-grant university. ...


The baseball team boasts involvement in the first-ever televised sporting event. On May 17, 1939 fledgling NBC filmed the doubleheader of the Columbia Lions vs. Princeton Tigers at Columbia's Baker Field.[80] is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television network. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


In basketball, perhaps the greatest player to wear Columbia Blue was All-American Chet Forte, the 1957 national college player of the year. George Gregory, Jr. became the first African-American All-American in 1931. The 1968 Ivy League championship team included future NBA player Jim McMillian. All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... Chet Forte was an American television director. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... James M. Jim McMillian (born March 11, 1948 in Raeford, North Carolina) is a former pro basketball player. ...


Controversies and student demonstrations

Nazi Germany

In 1933 the German Ambassador to the United States, Hans Luther, was the featured speaker at the Institute of Arts and Sciences at the Columbia University. When he started to speak a woman in the audience asked him about the burning of the homes of exiled professors. She and two other protesters were forcibly removed by security. Hans Luther's speech stressed Hitler's "peaceful intentions" toward his European neighbors. Afterward, Nicholas Murray Butler, Columbia's president, held a reception in his honor. The head of the institute, Russell Potter, called the protestors "ill-mannered children"[81]. Protestors handing out leaflets protesting against Nazi Germany were arrested.[81][82] Hans Luther (10 March 1885–11 May 1962) was a German politician and former Chancellor of Germany. ... Nicholas Murray Butler Nicholas Murray Butler (April 2, 1862 – December 7, 1947) was an American philosopher, diplomat, and educator. ...


Protests of 1968

Students initiated a major demonstration in 1968 over two major issues. The first was Columbia's proposed gymnasium in neighboring Morningside Park; this was seen by the protesters to be an act of aggression aimed at the black residents of neighboring Harlem. A second issue was the Columbia administration's failure to resign its institutional membership in the Pentagon's weapons research think-tank, the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA). Students barricaded themselves inside Low Library, Hamilton Hall, and several other university buildings during the protests, and New York City police were called onto the campus to arrest or forcibly remove the students.[83] In early March 1967, a Columbia University SDS activist named Bob Feldman reportedly discovered documents in the International Law Library detailing Columbias institutional affiliation with the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA), a think-tank affiliated with the US Department of Defense. ... Morningside Park is a New York City public park located at the east edge of Morningside Heights. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... This article is about the United States military building. ... The Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) is a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) focusing on defense issues. ... Low Library The Low Memorial Library is the administrative centre of Columbia University. ... Looking toward Hamilton Hall at dusk Hamilton Hall is an academic building on the Morningside Heights campus of Columbia University in the City of New York. ...


Protests against racism and apartheid

Further student protests, including hunger strike and more barricades of Hamilton Hall during the late 1970s and early 1980s, were aimed at convincing the university trustees to divest all of the university's investments in companies that were seen as active or tacit supporters of the apartheid regime in South Africa. A variety of more recent protests, most notably those of Spring 2004 and Spring 2006, have primarily concerned perceived racism on campus. Looking toward Hamilton Hall at dusk Hamilton Hall is an academic building on the Morningside Heights campus of Columbia University in the City of New York. ... For the legal definition of apartheid, see the crime of apartheid. ...


Antiwar protests

In addition to the 1968 protests (see above), tangentially related to the Vietnam War, students and faculty have protested U.S. involvement in various other conflicts. Most recently and controversially, at a faculty sit-in protest of the Iraq War, Professor Nicholas de Genova praised "fragging" (soldiers murdering fellow soldiers) and called for U.S. troops to experience "a million Mogadishus," a reference to the casualties U.S. troops suffered in the Battle of Mogadishu in 1993. The U.S. Military Veterans of Columbia University, a Columbia University student-veterans group, issued this letter in response to Professor De Genova's remarks. Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Nicholas de Genova is a professor of anthropology at Columbia University. ... Frag is a term from the Vietnam war, most commonly meaning to assassinate an unpopular member of ones own fighting unit by dropping a fragmentation grenade into the victims tent at night. ... Combatants USSOF, UNOSOM II, Frontier Force Regiment Somali National Alliance-affiliated militias Commanders William F. Garrison Mohamed Farrah Aidid Strength 160 2,000-4,000 Casualties U.S. 18 killed 73 wounded 1 captured Malaysia 1 killed 7 wounded Pakistan 2 wounded SNA Militia and civilians At least 500[1...


Ad Hoc Grievance Committee (Allegations of faculty intimidation of Jewish students)

In 2004 Columbia drew nationwide attention when allegations were made that some professors intimidated and harassed students with pro-Israel views. [84] Nat Hentoff of the Village Voice accused Columbia of sweeping a serious problem under the carpet. [85] Nat Hentoff (born June 10, 1925) is an American civil libertarian, free speech absolutist, pro-life advocate, anti-death penalty advocate, jazz critic, historian, biographer and anecdotist, and columnist for the Village Voice, Legal Times, Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher, Free Inquiry and Jewish World Review. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ...


Minuteman protest

On October 4, 2006, a group of students disrupted a speech by Jim Gilchrist, the founder of the Minuteman Project, a group that patrols the border between the United States and Mexico, who had been invited to campus by the Columbia College Republicans. Two student members of the International Socialist Organization stepped on to the stage and unfurled a banner that stated, in Spanish, English, and Arabic, "No human being is illegal", a criticism of the Minuteman Project's attitude toward illegal immigrants. This action incited other students to rush the stage, including members of the school's Chicano Caucus. A brawl between protestors and supporters of the Minuteman project ensued. Gilchrist and Marvin Stewart, another Minuteman member, were escorted away after the protesters stormed onstage.[86] is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Jim Gilchrist (born 1949) is the founder of the Minuteman Project, a group whose aim is to prevent illegal immigration across the USAs southern border. ... The Minuteman Project is an activist organization started in April 2005 by a group of private United States individuals to monitor the United States–Mexico borders flow of illegal immigrants, although it has expanded to include the United States-Canada border as well. ... The International Socialist Organization (ISO) is a socialist organization in the United States. ...


The protesters were initially accused of attacking the Minutemen. However, video tape of the events surfaced that shows violence being initiated by supporters of the Minuteman Project against the protestors.[87][88]


The students' actions were condemned as violations of the Minuteman Project's right to free speech by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg[89], University President Lee Bollinger[90], and media figures from across the country.[88] Representatives of the protestors claimed they were fighting hatred, not free speech.[91] Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of New York City. ... Lee C. Bollinger is an American lawyer and educator who is currently serving as the 19th president of Columbia University. ...


The University responded with disciplinary action, charging eight students with violating University rules. Three Latino students received harsher punishments than the other students, resulting in some accusations of unfairness and racism at the University.[92]


Mahmoud Ahmadinejad visit and speech controversy

Further information: Lee Bollinger
Wikinews has related news:
Protests mark Ahmadinejad's visit to Columbia University
Students protest Ahmadinejad's visit.
Students protest Ahmadinejad's visit.

On September 24, 2007, Columbia and its School of International and Public Affairs invited Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to speak on campus as part of Columbia University's World Leaders Forum.[93] The invitation was criticized by some, applauded by others.[94] Lee C. Bollinger is an American lawyer and educator who is currently serving as the 19th president of Columbia University. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixels, file size: 5. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixels, file size: 5. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) of Columbia University is a public policy school and one of the most prestigious schools of international affairs and/or public affairs in the United States, and internationally. ...  [1] (born October 28, 1956)[2] is the sixth and current President of the Islamic Republic of Iran. ...


In his introductory speech, University President Lee Bollinger called Ahmadinejad, a "petty and cruel dictator" and asked him questions about previous remarks concerning the holocaust and his record on human rights.[95] Ahmadinejad responded to Bollinger's remarks by saying: Lee C. Bollinger is an American lawyer and educator who is currently serving as the 19th president of Columbia University. ...

"In Iran, tradition requires when you invite a person to be a speaker, we actually respect our students enough to allow them to make their own judgment, and don't think it's necessary before the speech is even given to come in with a series of complaints to provide vaccination to the students and faculty."

During his speech, Ahmadinejad criticized Israel's policies towards the Palestinians, called for research on the historical accuracy of Holocaust, expressed his sympathy for the families of the victims of 9/11 attacks, raised questions as to who initiated the attacks, expressed the self-determination of Iran's nuclear power program, criticizing the United Nation's policy of sanctions on his country, and criticized U.S. policy in the Middle East. In response to a question about Iran's treatment of women and homosexuals, he asserted that women are respected in Iran, and denied that there are any homosexuals in Iran.[96][97] For the term Palestinian as applied to Jews, see Palestinian Jew. ... “Shoah” redirects here. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Self-determination is a principle in international law that a people ought to be able to determine their own governmental forms and structure free from outside influence. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ...


Tenure Battles

Political battles over tenure decisions drew national attention, particularly to Joseph Massad and Nadia Abu El Haj. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Nadia Abu El Haj (b. ...


Traditions

For a more comprehensive list see: Columbia traditions

Like many other old and new universities around the world, Columbia University has developed many traditions over its 253 year long existence. ...

Orgo Night

On the day before the Organic Chemistry exam—which is often on the first day of finals—at precisely the stroke of midnight, the Columbia University Marching Band occupies Butler Library to distract diligent students from studying. After a half-hour of campus-interest jokes, the procession then moves out to the lawn in front of Hartley, Wallach and John Jay residence halls to entertain the residents there. The band then plays at various other locations around Morningside Heights, including the residential quadrangle of Barnard College, where students of the all-women's school, in mock-consternation, rain trash - including notes and course packets - and water balloons upon them from their dormitories above. The band tends to close their Orgo Night performances before Furnald Hall, known among students as the more studious and reportedly "anti-social" residence hall, where the underclassmen in the marching band serenade the seniors with an entertaining, though vulgar, mock-hymn to Columbia, composed of quips that poke fun at the various stereotypes about the Columbia student body. The Columbia University Marching Band The Columbia University Marching Band (CUMB) has performed for Columbia University since 1904. ... Butler Library The Nicholas Murray Butler Library, commonly known simply as Butler Library, is the largest single library in the Columbia University Library System, which contains over 8. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ...


Tree-Lighting and Yule Log ceremonies

College Walk is illuminated in the winter months

The campus Tree-Lighting Ceremony is a relatively new tradition at Columbia, inaugurated in 1998. It celebrates the illumination of the medium-sized trees lining College Walk in front of Kent and Hamilton Halls on the east end and Dodge and Journalism Halls on the west, just before finals week in early December. The lights remain on until February 28. Students meet at the sun-dial for free hot chocolate, performances by various a cappella groups, and speeches by the university president and a guest. Image File history File links Collegewalk2. ... Image File history File links Collegewalk2. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Immediately following the College Walk festivities is one of Columbia's older holiday traditions, the lighting of the Yule Log. The ceremony dates to a period prior to the Revolutionary War, but lapsed before being revived by University President Nicholas Murray Butler in the early 20th century. A troop of students dressed in Continental Army soldiers carry the eponymous log from the sun-dial to the lounge of John Jay Hall, where it is lit amid the singing of seasonal carols.[98] The ceremony is accompanied by a reading of A Visit From St. Nicholas by Clement Clarke Moore (Columbia College class of 1798) and Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus by Francis Pharcellus Church (Class of 1859). The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Nicholas Murray Butler Nicholas Murray Butler (April 2, 1862 – December 7, 1947) was an American philosopher, diplomat, and educator. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Cover of a 1912 edition of the poem, illustrated by Jessie Willcox Smith. ... Clement Clarke Moore, (July 15, 1779 – July 10, 1863), is best known as the credited author of A Visit From St. ... Francis Pharcellus Church, writer of the famous editorial. ... Francis Pharcellus Church. ...


The Varsity Show

Main article: The Varsity Show

An annual musical written by and for students, this is one of Columbia's oldest and finest traditions. Past writers and directors have included Columbians Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, Lorenz Hart, I.A.L. Diamond, and Herman Wouk. The show has one of the largest operating budgets of all university events.[99] The Varsity Show, founded in 1894, is one of the oldest traditions at Columbia University, and certainly its oldest performing arts tradition. ... This article is about the American composer. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Lorenz (Larry) Hart (May 2, 1895 - November 22, 1943) was the lyricist half of the famed Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart. ... I.A.L. Diamond (27 June 1920 - 21 April 1988) was a comedy writer in Hollywood during the 1940 and 50s. ... Herman Wouk (May 27, 1915 —) is a bestselling American author with a number of notable novels to his credit, including The Caine Mutiny, The Winds of War, and War and Remembrance. ...


Inventions, discoveries and patents

Riverside Church (left), as seen from Pupin Hall
Riverside Church (left), as seen from Pupin Hall

Columbia is home to numerous scientific and technological breakthroughs. It was the first North American site where the Uranium atom was split. It was the birthplace of FM radio and the laser.[100] The MPEG-2 algorithm of transmitting high quality audio and video over limited bandwidth was developed by Dimitris Anastassiou, a Columbia professor of electrical engineering. Biologist Martin Chalfie was the first to introduce the use of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) in labelling cells in intact organisms[101]. Other inventions and products related to Columbia include Sequential Lateral Solidifcation (SLS) technology for making LCDs, System Management Arts (SMARTS), Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) (which is used for audio, video, chat, instant messaging and whiteboarding), pharmacopeia, Macromodel (a software for computational chemistry), a new and better recipe for glass concrete, Blue LEDs, Beamprop (used in photonics), among others.[102] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 1. ... Riverside Church as seen from West 121st Street The Riverside Church in the City of New York is an interdenominational (American Baptist and United Church of Christ), interracial, international church in New York City, famous not only for its elaborate Gothic architecture — which includes the worlds largest carillon — but... This article is about the chemical element. ... FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... For other uses, see Laser (disambiguation). ... MPEG-2 is a standard for the generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information [1]. It is widely used around the world to specify the format of the digital television signals that are broadcast by terrestrial (over-the-air), cable, and direct broadcast satellite TV systems. ... It has been suggested that mGFP be merged into this article or section. ... The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is an application-layer control (signaling) protocol for creating, modifying, and terminating sessions with one or more participants. ... Pharmacopeia (literally, the art of the drug compounder), in its modern technical sense, is a book containing directions for the identification of samples and the preparation of compound medicines, and published by the authority of a government or a medical or pharmaceutical society. ... External links LEd Category: TeX ...


Some of the greatest contributions by Columbia scientists have been in the health sciences field, including about 175 new inventions each year[102]. More than 30 pharmaceutical products based on discoveries and inventions made at Columbia are on the market today. These include Remicade (for arthritis), Reopro (for blood clot complications), Xalatan (for glaucoma), Benefix, Latanoprost (a glaucoma treatment), shoulder prosthesis, homocysteine (testing for cardiovascular disease), Zolinza (for cancer therapy)[103]. Infliximab (Remicade®) is a powerful drug used to treat auto-immune disorders like Crohns disease and rheumatoid arthritis. ... Abciximab (previously known as c7E3 Fab), manufactured by Centocor and distributed by Eli Lilly under the trade name ReoPro®, is a platelet aggregation inhibitor mainly used during and after coronary artery procedures like angioplasty to prevent platelets from sticking together and causing thrombus (blood clot) formation within the coronary artery. ... Latanoprost (pronounced la-TA-noe-prost) ophthalmic solution is a topical medication used for controlling the progression of glaucoma or ocular hypertension, by reducing intraocular pressure. ... Latanoprost (pronounced la-TA-noe-prost) ophthalmic solution is a topical medication used for controlling the progression of glaucoma or ocular hypertension, by reducing intraocular pressure. ... Homocysteine is a chemical compound with the formula HSCH2CH2CH(NH2)CO2H. It is a homologue of the naturally-occurring amino acid cysteine, differing in that its side-chain contains an additional methylene (-CH2-) group before the thiol (-SH) group. ... Vorinostat (rINN) or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), brand name Zolinza®, is a drug currently under investigation for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), a type of skin cancer, to be used when the disease persists, gets worse, or comes back during or after treatment with other medicines. ...


Columbia ranks among the top U.S. schools in revenues earned from patents and license agreements on its inventions and discoveries. Its Science and Technology Ventures currently manages some 600 patents and more than 250 active license agreements[103]. Patent-related deals earned Columbia more than $230 million in the 2006 fiscal year, according to the university[104]. In 2004, Columbia made $178 million (compared to $24 million made by Harvard)[104]. Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Awards and honors

As of October 2006, 76[105]Columbia University affiliates have been honored with Nobel Prizes for their work in physics[106], chemistry, medicine, literature, peace, and economics. In the last 10 years (1996-2006) 15 Columbia affiliates have won Nobel Prizes, of which 8 are current faculty members. (Economics-6, Physiology/Medicine-4, Physics-2, Chemistry-2, Literature-1)


Columbia faculty awarded the Nobel Prize in the last 10 years (1996-2006):[107]

Faculty Affiliation at Columbia Nobel Prize
1.Orhan Pamuk Dept.of Middle East Languages & Cultures Literature, 2006
2.Edmund Phelps Dept. of Economics Economics, 2006
3.Richard Axel Center for Neurobiology & Behavior, A.B.1967 Physiology/Medicine, 2004
4.Joseph Stiglitz Dept. of Economics Economics, 2001
5.Eric Kandel Center for Neurobiology & Behavior Physiology/Medicine, 2000
6.Robert Mundell Dept. of Economics Economics, 1999
7.Horst Stormer Dept. of Physics Physics, 1998
8.William Vickrey Dept. of Economics, M.A.1937,PhD1948 Economics, 1996

Columbia affiliates awarded the Nobel Prize in the last 10 years (1996-2006):[107] Ferit Orhan Pamuk (born on June 7, 1952 in Istanbul) is a Nobel Prize-winning Turkish novelist. ... Edmund Strother Phelps (born July 26, 1933 in Evanston, Illinois) is an American professor of economics at Columbia University, who was awarded the 2006 The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, commonly known as the Nobel Prize in Economics. ... Richard Axel, M.D. (born July 2, 1946, New York City) is an American scientist whose work on the olfactory system won him and Linda B. Buck, a former post-doctoral scientist in his research group, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2004. ... Joseph Stiglitz (born February 9, 1943) is an American economist, author and winner of Nobel Prize for economics ( 2001). ... Eric Richard Kandel (born November 7, 1929) is a neuroscientist who won a Nobel Prize in the year 2000 for his research on the physiological basis of memory storage in neurons. ... Robert Alexander Mundell C.C. (born October 24, 1932) is a professor of economics at Columbia University. ... Horst Ludwig Störmer (born April 6, 1949) is a Bell Labs physicist who shared the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physics with Daniel Tsui and Robert Laughlin. ... William Spencer Vickrey (June 21, 1914, Victoria, British Columbia - October 11, 1996, New York State) was a Columbia University professor, who was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics just three days before he died. ...

Name Affiliation at Columbia Nobel Prize
9.John Mather Goddard Institute for Space Studies Physics, 2006
10.Robert Grubbs PhD 1968 Chemistry, 2005
11.Linda Buck Research Scientist 1980-91 Physiology/Medicine, 2004
12.William Knowles PhD 1942 Chemistry, 2001
13.James Heckman Faculty 1970-74 Economics, 2000
14.Louis Ignarro B.S. 1962 Physiology/Medicine, 1998
15.Robert Merton B.S. 1966 Economics, 1997

Other awards/honors won by current faculty include: John Mather is a mathematician at Princeton University known for his work on Hamiltonian dynamics, descended from Atherton Mather, a cousin of Cotton Mather. ... Robert Howard Grubbs (b. ... Linda B. Buck, Ph. ... William Knowles may refer to William Standish Knowles, American chemist William Erskine Knowles, Canadian Liberal MP (1906-1921) William David Knowles, Canadian Progressive Conservative MP (1968-1979) Category: ... James Heckman (born April 19, 1944) is an economist at the University of Chicago. ... Dr. Louis J. Ignarro (b. ... This article is about the economist. ...

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a major private grant-making foundation based in Chicago that has awarded more than US$3 billion since its inception in 1978. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. ... A national academy is a body, usually operating with state financial support and approval, that co-ordinates the activities of research in (nearly always) the sciences and (sometimes) other disciplines. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... Founded in 1964, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in the United States provides engineering leadership in service to the nation. ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...

Presidents

President Birth Year–Death Year Years as President Name of Institution; Notes
1 Samuel Johnson (1696–1772) (1754–1763) King's College
2 Myles Cooper (1735–1785) (1763–1775) King's College
2.1 Benjamin Moore (1748–1816) (1775–1776) King's College; acting
2.2 George Clinton (1739–1812) (1784–1787) Columbia College "in the State of New York"; Chancellor (Regents government)
3 William Samuel Johnson (1727–1819) (1787–1800) Columbia College "in the City of New York" (Trustees government)
4 Charles Henry Wharton (1748–1833) (1801–1801) Columbia College
5 Benjamin Moore (1748–1816) (1801–1810) Columbia College
6 William Harris (1765–1829) (1811–1829) Columbia College; shares authority with Provost John Mitchell Mason until 1816
7 William Alexander Duer (1780–1858) (1829–1842) Columbia College
8 Nathaniel Fish Moore (1782–1872) (1842–1849) Columbia College
9 Charles King (1789–1867) (1849–1863) Columbia College; presides over move to Madison Avenue campus
10 Frederick Augustus Porter Barnard (1809–1889) (1864–1889) Columbia College
11 Seth Low (1850–1916) (1890–1901) Columbia College; presides over move to Morningside Heights campus; name changes to "Columbia University in the City of New York"
12 Nicholas Murray Butler (1862–1947) (1902–1945) Columbia University
12.1 Frank D. Fackenthal (1883–1968) (1945–1948) Columbia University (acting)
13 Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890–1969) (1948–1953) Columbia University; on leave while Supreme Commander of NATO
14 Grayson L. Kirk (1903–1997) (1953–1968) Columbia University; resigned after 1968 protests
15 Andrew W. Cordier (1901–1975) (1969–1970) Columbia University
16 William J. McGill (1922–1997) (1970–1980) Columbia University
17 Michael I. Sovern (1931– ) (1980–1993) Columbia University
18 George Erik Rupp (1942– ) (1993–2002) Columbia University
19 Lee C. Bollinger (1947– ) (2002– ) Columbia University

Rev. ... Portrait of Myles Cooper by John Singleton Copley Myles Cooper (1735 – 1785) was a figure in colonial New York. ... Benjamin Moore (1748 - 1816) was a U.S. episcopal clergyman. ... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ... For other persons named William Johnson, see William Johnson (disambiguation). ... WHARTON, Charles Henry, clergyman, born in St. ... Benjamin Moore (1748 - 1816) was a U.S. episcopal clergyman. ... William Harris, an Episcopalian minister, is elected sixth president of Columbia College, with John Mitchell Mason, a Presbyterian minister, its first provost and chief operating officer. ... For other men with similar names, see the disambiguation page: William Duer. ... Nathaniel Fish Moore, the nephew of former president Benjamin Moore, becomes Columbias eighth president; he had earlier been a lawyer and served on the faculty. ... Charles King succeeds the resigning Moore as Columbias ninth president. ... Frederick Augustus Porter Barnard (May 5, 1809 - April 27, 1889), American scientist and educationalist, was born in Sheffield, Massachusetts, on the 5th of May 1809. ... Seth Low, born in Brooklyn, New York, (January 18, 1850 - September 17, 1916) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... Morningside Heights is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City and is bound by the Upper West Side, Morningside Park, Harlem, and Riverside Park (some now consider it part of the Upper West Side). ... Nicholas Murray Butler Nicholas Murray Butler (April 2, 1862 – December 7, 1947) was an American philosopher, diplomat, and educator. ... Frank Diehl Fackenthal , 1883-1968, American educator, b. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... This article is about the military alliance. ... Grayson Louis Kirk (October 12, 1903 - November 21, 1997) was president of Columbia University during the campus unrest that culminated in the student occupation of several buildings. ... In early March 1967, a Columbia University SDS activist named Bob Feldman reportedly discovered documents in the International Law Library detailing Columbias institutional affiliation with the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA), a think-tank affiliated with the US Department of Defense. ... Andrew Wellington Cordier (March 1, 1901 - July 11, 1975) was a United Nations official and President of Columbia University. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Michael I. Sovern (born 1931) is the Chancellor Kent Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. ... George Erik Rupp (born 1942) is an American educator and theologian, the former President of Rice University and later of Columbia University, and president of the International Rescue Committee since July 2002. ... Lee C. Bollinger is an American lawyer, educator and is currently serving as the 19th president of Columbia University. ...

Notable Columbians

This is a partially sorted list of notable persons who have had ties to Columbia University. ...

Alumni and attenders

Alexander Hamilton, the most famous attendee of King's College (Columbia's progenitor)
Alexander Hamilton, the most famous attendee of King's College (Columbia's progenitor)

Two former Presidents of the United States have attended Columbia. Six Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States and 39 Nobel Prize winners have obtained degrees from Columbia. Today, three United States Senators and 16 current Chief Executives of Fortune 500 companies hold Columbia degrees, as do three of the 25 richest Americans[13]. Image File history File links Alexander_Hamilton_portrait_by_John_Trumbull_1806. ... Image File history File links Alexander_Hamilton_portrait_by_John_Trumbull_1806. ... Alexander Hamilton (November 20, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was the first Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, political economist,] financier, and political theorist. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ...


Attendees of King's College, Columbia's predecessor, included Founding Fathers Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, Robert R. Livingston, and Gouverneur Morris. U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justices Harlan Fiske Stone, Charles Evans Hughes and Associate Justice Benjamin Cardozo, as well as former US Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, were all educated at the law school. Former U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower served as President of the University. Other significant figures in American history to attend the university were John L. O'Sullivan, the journalist who coined the phrase "manifest destiny", Alfred Thayer Mahan, the geostrategist who wrote on the significance of sea power, and progressive intellectual Randolph Bourne. Former Secretary of State Alexander Haig studied at Columbia Business School between 1954 and 1955. Wellington Koo, a Chinese diplomat who argued passionately against Japanese and Western imperialism in Asia at the Paris Peace Conference, is a graduate, having honed his debating skills in Columbia's Philolexian Society, as is Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar, founding father of India and co-author of its constitution. Local politicians have been no less represented at Columbia, including Seth Low, who served as both President of the University and Mayor of the City of New York, and New York governors Thomas Dewey, also an unsuccessful US presidential candidate, DeWitt Clinton, who presided over the construction of the Erie Canal, Hamilton Fish, later to become US Secretary of State, and Daniel D. Tompkins, who also served as a Vice President of the United States. “Founders” redirects here. ... Alexander Hamilton (November 20, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was the first Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, political economist,] financier, and political theorist. ... For other persons named John Jay, see John Jay (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Gouverneur Morris Gouverneur Morris (January 31, 1752 – November 6, 1816) was an American statesman who represented Pennsylvania in the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and was an author of large sections of the Constitution of the United States. ... Harlan Fiske Stone (October 11, 1872 – April 22, 1946) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as the dean of Columbia Law School, Attorney General of the United States, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and later Chief Justice of the United States. ... Charles Evans Hughes, Sr. ... Justice Benjamin Nathan Cardozo (May 24, 1870–July 9, 1938) was a distinguished American jurist who is remembered not only for his landmark decisions on negligence but also his modesty and philosophy. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... John L. OSullivan as he appeared on the cover of Harpers Weekly in November 1874. ... Rear Admiral Alfred Thayer Mahan (September 27, 1840–December 1, 1914) was a United States Navy officer, geostrategist, and educator. ... Randolph Silliman Bourne (May 30, 1886 – December 22, 1918) was a progressive writer and public intellectual born in Bloomfield, New Jersey, and a graduate of Columbia University. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... For other persons named Alexander Haig, see Alexander Haig (disambiguation). ... Columbia Business School (also known as CBS) is the business school of Columbia University in New York, New York. ... Wellington Koo in 1912 Vi Kyuin Wellington Koo (Chinese: 顾维钧;Pinyin: Gù WéijÅ«n; Wade-Giles: Ku Wei-chün) (January 29, 1887 – November 14, 1985) was a Chinese diplomat and a representative to the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. ... Paris 1919 redirects here. ... The Philolexian Society of Columbia University is one of the oldest collegiate literary societies in the United States, and the oldest student group at Columbia. ... Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar (Marathi: बाबासाहेब भीमराव आंबेडकर) (April 14, 1891 — December 6, 1956) was a Buddhist revivalist, Indian jurist, scholar and Bahujan political leader who is the chief architect of the Indian Constitution. ... Seth Low, born in Brooklyn, New York, (January 18, 1850 - September 17, 1916) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... Thomas Edmund Dewey (b. ... DeWitt Clinton. ... The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Hamilton Fish Hamilton Fish, (3 August 1808–7 September 1893), born in New York City, was an American statesman who served as Governor of New York, United States Senator and United States Secretary of State. ... Daniel D. Tompkins (June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825) was an entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and the sixth Vice President of the United States. ...


Philip Gunawardena, a Sri Lankan Revolutionary and Indian Freedom Fighter, who was later to be known as "The Father of Socialism in Sri Lanka", joined Columbia in 1925 for his post-graduate studies. He was later to become a Cabinet Minister, instituting far-reaching changes in Sri Lanka's agrarian structure. General, historian, and author John Watts de Peyster, who was influential in the modernization of the New York National Guard, New York Police Department, and the Fire Department of New York, attendeed Columbia College and later received a M.A. degree. Don Philip Rupesinghe Gunawardena (b. ... For his son, see John Watts de Peyster Jr. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... The Fire Department, City of New York (FDNY) has the responsibility of protecting the New York Citys five boroughs from fires and fire hazards, as well as preventing disasters like The Station nightclub fire in nearby Rhode Island, and the trampling deaths at an overcrowded building in Chicago. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ...

John Jay, Founding Father, diplomat and First Chief Justice of the United States
John Jay, Founding Father, diplomat and First Chief Justice of the United States

More recent political figures educated at Columbia include current U.S. Senators Barack Obama of Illinois,Judd Gregg of New Hampshire and Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey, Governor of New York David Paterson and his Chief of Staff Charles J. O'Byrne, former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, UN weapons inspector Hans Blix, former UN Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, conservative commentators Patrick J. Buchanan and Norman Podhoretz, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, former chairman of the US Federal Reserve Bank Alan Greenspan, George Stephanopoulos, Senior Advisor to former US President Bill Clinton, George Pataki, the former governor of New York State, and Mikhail Saakashvili, the current President of the country of Georgia. Louisiana Lieutenant Governor (1956–1960) Lether Frazar, who was president of two universities in his state, obtained his Ph.D. from Columbia in 1942. Image File history File links John_Jay_(Gilbert_Stuart_portrait). ... Image File history File links John_Jay_(Gilbert_Stuart_portrait). ... For other persons named John Jay, see John Jay (disambiguation). ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Judd Gregg (born February 14, 1947) is a former Governor of New Hampshire and current United States Senator serving as ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Frank Raleigh Lautenberg (born January 23, 1924) is a businessman and Democratic Party politician. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... This article is about the Governor of New York. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born Marie Jana Korbelová, IPA: , on May 15, 1937) was the first woman to become United States Secretary of State. ...   (born 28 June 1928 in Uppsala, Sweden) is a Swedish diplomat and politician. ... Boutros Boutros-Ghali (Arabic: بطرس بطرس غالي, Coptic: Î’OΥΤΡΟC BOYTPOC ΓΑΛΗ) (born November 14, 1922) is an Egyptian diplomat who was the sixth Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1992 to December 1996. ... Patrick Joseph Pat Buchanan (born November 2, 1938) is an American politician, author, syndicated columnist and broadcaster. ... Norman Podhoretz (b. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... Squalltoonix (born March 6, 1926 in New York City) is an American economist and was Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve of the United States from 1987 to 2006. ... George Stephanopoulos (born February 10, 1961) is an American broadcaster and political adviser. ... George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is an American politician who was the 57th Governor of New York serving from January 1995 until January 1, 2007. ... Mikhail Saakashvili briefing the press at UN headquarters Mikhail Saakashvili (Georgian: მიხეილ სააკაშვილი) (born December 21, 1967, in Tbilisi) is a Georgian jurist and politician and the current President of Georgia. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Lether Edward Frazar (December 1, 1904 – May 15, 1960) was the Democratic lieutenant governor of Louisiana under Governor Earl Kemp Long from 1956-1960, who had earlier, as a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives from Beauregard Parish, authored the state teacher retirement law. ...


Scientists Stephen Jay Gould, Robert Millikan and Michael Pupin, cultural historian Jacques Barzun, literary critic Lionel Trilling, sociologists Immanuel Wallerstein and Seymour Martin Lipset, behavioral psychologist Charles Ferster, poet-professor Mark Van Doren, philosophers Irwin Edman and Robert Nozick, and economists Milton Friedman, Former Afghan Finance Minister Ashraf Ghani, Daniel C. Kurtzer, and communications economist Harvey J. Levin all obtained degrees from Columbia. Stephen Jay Gould (September 10, 1941 – May 20, 2002) was an American paleontologist, evolutionary biologist, and historian of science. ... Robert Andrews Millikan (March 22, 1868 – December 19, 1953) was an American experimental physicist who won the 1923 Nobel Prize for his measurement of the charge on the electron and for his work on the photoelectric effect. ... Mihajlo Pupin. ... Jacques Martin Barzun (b. ... Lionel Trilling (July 4, 1905 – November 5, 1975) was an American literary critic, author, and teacher. ... Immanuel Maurice Wallerstein (born 28 September 1930, New York City) is a U.S. sociologist by credentials, but a historical social scientist, or world-systems analyst by trade. ... Seymour Martin Lipset (born 1922) is a political sociologist. ... Charles Bohris Ferster was an American behavioral psychologist. ... Mark Van Doren (June 13, 1894 – December 10, 1972) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and critic. ... IRWIN EDMAN (November 28, 1896 – September 4, 1954) was an American philosopher and professor of philosophy. ... Robert Nozick (November 16, 1938 – January 23, 2002) was an American philosopher and Pellegrino University Professor at Harvard University. ... Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American Nobel Laureate economist and public intellectual. ... Ashraf Ghani is currently Chancellor of Kabul University, and Chairman of the Institute of State Effectiveness, an organization set up in January 2005 to promote the ability of states to serve their citizens. ... Daniel C. Kurtzer - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


In culture and the arts, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Lorenz Hart, screenwriters Sidney Buchman and I.A.L. Diamond, critic and biographer Tim Page and musician Art Garfunkel are all among Columbia's alumni. The poets Langston Hughes, Federico García Lorca, Joyce Kilmer and John Berryman; the writers Eudora Welty, Isaac Asimov, J. D. Salinger, Upton Sinclair, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Phyllis Haislip, Roger Zelazny, Herman Wouk, Hunter S. Thompson, and Paul Auster; playwrights Tony Kushner and Eulalie Spence; the architects Robert A. M. Stern, Ricardo Scofidio, Peter Eisenman and Christine Wang; the composer Béla Bartók; and film director and screenwriter Cetywa Powell also attended the university. Trappist monk, author, and humanist Thomas Merton is an alumnus both as an undergraduate and graduate student, and converted to Catholicism while attending. Urban theorist and cultural critic Jane Jacobs spent time at the School of General Studies. Educator Elisabeth Irwin received her M.A. there in 1923. Television talk show host Sally Jesse Raphael is a graduate. Vampire Weekend band members Ezra Koenig, Rostam Batmanglij, Chris Tomson, and Chris Baio. Allison Starling and Remy Zaken, both Broadway actresses, are currently attending Columbia. Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. ... Lorenz (Larry) Hart (May 2, 1895 - November 22, 1943) was the lyricist half of the famed Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart. ... Sidney Robert Buchman (March 27, 1902 – August 23, 1975) was a film writer and producer who worked on 38 films from the late 1920s to the early 1970s. ... I.A.L. Diamond (27 June 1920 - 21 April 1988) was a comedy writer in Hollywood during the 1940 and 50s. ... Tim Page (born October 11, 1954 in San Diego, California) is a writer, editor, producer and music critic. ... Art Garfunkel in Bad Timing (1980) Arthur Ira Garfunkel (born November 5, 1941) is an American white gollywog and actor, best known as half of the folk duo Simon and Garfunkel. ... Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967) was an American poet, novelist, playwright, short story writer, and columnist. ... Federico García Lorca Federico García Lorca (June 5, 1898 – August 19, 1936) was a Spanish poet and dramatist, also remembered as a painter, pianist, and composer. ... Alfred Joyce Kilmer (6 December 1886 – 30 July 1918) was an American journalist, poet, literary critic, lecturer and editor. ... John Allyn Berryman (originally John Allyn Smith) (October 25, 1914 – January 7, 1972) was an American poet, born in McAlester, Oklahoma. ... Eudora Welty (b. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) (pronounced ) is an American author best known for his 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye and his reclusive nature. ... Upton Sinclair Jr. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Roger Joseph Zelazny (May 13, 1937 – June 14, 1995) was an American writer of fantasy and science fiction short stories and novels. ... Herman Wouk (May 27, 1915 —) is a bestselling American author with a number of notable novels to his credit, including The Caine Mutiny, The Winds of War, and War and Remembrance. ... Hunter Stockton Thompson (18 July 1937 – 20 February 2005) was an American journalist and author, famous for his novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. ... Paul Auster Paul Benjamin Auster (born February 3, 1947, Newark, New Jersey) is a Brooklyn-based author. ... Tony Kushner (born July 16, 1956) is an award-winning American playwright most famous for his play Angels in America, for which he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. ... Eulalie Spence (June 11, 1894 - March 7, 1981) was a black, female writer, teacher, actress and playwright from the British West Indies during the Harlem Renaissance. ... Robert Arthur Morton Stern, usually credited as Robert A. M. Stern, (born May 23, 1939) is an American architect and Dean of the Yale University School of Architecture. ... Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio (known as Diller + Scofidio) are the first architects to win a MacArthur Prize -- the so-called genius grant. ... Installation art by Peter Eisenman in the courtyard of Castelvecchio Museum in Verona, Italy, Entitled: Il giardino dei passi perduti, (The garden of the lost steps) Peter Eisenman (born August 11, 1932 in Newark, New Jersey) is one of the foremost practitioners of deconstructivism in American architecture. ... Bartok redirects here. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Trappist can refer to: a religious order - see Trappists some of the products, made by the order - see Trappist beer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Thomas Merton (January 31, 1915 – December 10, 1968) was one of the most influential Catholic authors of the 20th century. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Jane Jacobs, OC, O.Ont (May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006) was an American-born Canadian urbanist, writer and activist. ... Elisabeth Antoinette Irwin (29 August 1880, Brooklyn, New York - 16 October 1942, Manhattan) was the founder of the Little Red School House. ... Sally Jessy Raphaël (born Sally Lowenthal on February 25, 1935 in Easton, Pennsylvania) is an American talk show host and television presenter. ... Vampire Weekend is an indie rock band from New York City signed to XL Recordings. ... Remy Zaken (born May 9, 1989) is an American actress. ...


Baseball legends Lou Gehrig, Mo Berg (The Catcher Was a Spy) and Sandy Koufax, along with football quarterback Sid Luckman and sportscaster Roone Arledge, are alumni. Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... This article concerns athlete and OSS operative Morris Berg. ... Sanford Koufax (IPA pronunciation: /kofæks/) (born Sanford Braun, on December 30, 1935, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American left-handed former pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, from 1955 to 1966. ... Sid Luckman (November 21, 1916 - July 5, 1998) was an American football quarterback for the Chicago Bears from 1939 to 1950 leading the team to 4 NFL championships during that period. ... Roone Arledge (July 8, 1931 – December 5, 2002) was an American sports broadcasting pioneer who was chairman of ABC News from 1977 until his death, and a key part of the companys rise to competition with the two other main broadcasting stations, NBC and CBS, in the 60s, 70s...


Celebrities who graduated from Columbia include the actors Brian Dennehy, Jesse Bradford, Ben Stein, George Segal, Amanda Peet, Rafael Salguero, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Matthew Fox (Dr. Jack Shephard in the TV drama Lost), Rider Strong (Corey's best friend in the sitcom Boy Meets World) and Julia Stiles of 10 Things I Hate about You and Save the Last Dance, among other films. Joseph Gordon-Levitt, also of 10 Things I Hate About You, as well as 3rd Rock from the Sun, attended Columbia. Anna Paquin, who won an Oscar for her performance in the The Piano, also attended Columbia. Henry Mortensen, the son of Oscar nominated actor Viggo Mortensen is currently in his Sophomore year at Columbia and DJs a history of Rock n' Roll show on the Barnard College, Columbia radio station. The actress Famke Janssen graduated with a degree in writing and literature at Columbia. Liza Weil of Gilmore Girls attended as well. The actors Ed Harris and Jake Gyllenhaal attended Columbia for a time before dropping out as well. R&B Singer Lauryn Hill entered Columbia, but left after one year. Another R&B singer, Alicia Keys, was accepted to Columbia but never attended in order to dedicate herself fully to her musical career. Likewise, Japanese-American pop-star Utada Hikaru opted to pursue a musical career instead of finishing her undergraduate studies at Columbia. In other hand, Korean-American pop-star Lena Park attended the University in 2006.[110] Current head of the New York City Planning Department, Amanda Burden, received her masters at Columbia. Radio personality Tom Griswold of the nationally syndicated morning radio show The Bob and Tom Show graduated from Columbia. James Doty, the foremost chef of his generation and the "inventor" or pene a la vodka, is a graduate of Columbia College. Director Spike Lee has been spotted arriving for an evening class on campus.[111][dead link] Brian Dennehy (born July 9, 1938) is a two-time Tony Award-winning American actor who has appeared in movies, on television, and performed in live theater. ... Jesse Bradford. ... Benjamin Jeremy Stein[1] (born November 25, 1944) is an American writer and commentator, Emmy Award-winning actor, comedian, and game show host. ... George Segal George Segal (born February 13, 1934) is a well-known Jewish American film and stage actor who was born in Great Neck, Long Island, New York. ... Amanda Peet (born January 11, 1972) is an American actress. ... Maggie Ruth Gyllenhaal (born November 16, 1977) is an American actress. ... Matthew Fox (born July 14, 1966) is an actor and former model. ... LOST redirects here. ... Rider King Strong (born December 11, 1979) is an American actor. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Boy Meets World is an American television sitcom that chronicles the events and everyday life lessons of Cory Matthews, who grows up from a young boy to a married man. ... Julia OHara Stiles (born March 28, 1981) is an American stage and screen actress. ... 10 Things I Hate About You is a 1999 American romantic comedy film. ... Save the Last Dance is a motion picture produced by MTV Films, directed by Thomas Carter, written by Duane Adler, and released by Paramount Pictures on January 12, 2001. ... Joseph Leonard Gordon-Levitt (born February 17, 1981) is an American actor. ... This article is about a television show. ... Anna Helene Paquin (born July 24, 1982) is an Academy Award-winning and Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated Canadian actress. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... This article is about the film. ... Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn Viggo Peter Mortensen (born October 20, 1958 in New York City) is an Danish-american theater and movie actor, a published poet, musician, photographer and painter. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Viggo Peter Mortensen, Jr. ... Sophomore is used (especially in the USA) for describing a student in the second year of study (generally referring to high school or university study). ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... Famke Beumer Janssen (born November 5, 1965) is a Dutch actress and former fashion model. ... Liza Weil at an Warner Bros. ... Gilmore Girls is a long-running, Emmy Award winning, and Golden Globe nominated American television drama/comedy created by Amy Sherman-Palladino and starring Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel. ... For other persons of the same name, see Edward Harris. ... Jacob Benjamin Gyllenhaal[1] (born December 19, 1980) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Lauryn Noel Hill (born May 25, 1975) is an American singer, rapper, musician, record producer and film actress. ... Alexis is Alicias #1 fan. ... Utada redirects here. ... Lenas name transcribed in Tengwar. ... Amanda Jay Mortimer Burden (born 1944) is the director of the New York City Department of City Planning and chair of the City Planning Commission. ... Thomas Tom Griswold (born April 22, 1953 in Cleveland, Ohio) hosts the radio show The Bob & Tom Show together with his partner, Bob Kevoian. ... The Bob & Tom Show is a radio program established by Bob Kevoian and Tom Griswold at radio station WFBQ in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1983. ... Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an Emmy Award - winning, and Academy Award - nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ...


Faculty and affiliates

Jacques Barzun, Lionel Trilling, and Mark Van Doren were legendary Columbia faculty members as well as graduates, teaching alongside such luminaries as the philosopher John Dewey, American historians Richard Hofstadter, John A. Garraty, Charles Beard and Reinhard H Luthin, educator George Counts, sociologists Daniel Bell, C. Wright Mills, Robert K. Merton, and Paul Lazarsfeld, and art historian Meyer Schapiro. The history of the discipline of anthropology practically begins at Columbia with Franz Boas. Margaret Mead, a Barnard College alumna, along with Columbia graduate Ruth Benedict, continued this tradition by bringing the discipline into the spotlight. Nuclear physicists Enrico Fermi, John R. Dunning, I. I. Rabi, and Polykarp Kusch helped develop the Manhattan Project at the university, and pioneering geophysicist Maurice Ewing made great strides in the understanding of plate tectonics. Thomas Hunt Morgan discovered the chromosomal basis for genetic inheritance at his famous "fly room" at the university, laying the foundation for modern genetics. Philosopher Hannah Arendt was a visiting professor in the 1960s. Noted Chinese author and illustrator, Chiang Yee taught Chinese from 1955 to 1977, and retired as Emeritus Professor of Chinese. In 1978 Frank Daniel began his Columbia teaching career, he is most notable for his development of the sequence paradigm of screenwriting. American philospher and educator John Dewey Source: http://www. ... American philospher and educator John Dewey Source: http://www. ... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... Jacques Martin Barzun (b. ... Lionel Trilling (July 4, 1905 – November 5, 1975) was an American literary critic, author, and teacher. ... Mark Van Doren (June 13, 1894 – December 10, 1972) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and critic. ... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... Richard Hofstadter (August 6, 1916 - October 24, 1970) was an American historian and DeWitt Clinton Professor of American History at Columbia University. ... John Arthur Garraty is an American historian and biographer. ... Charles Austin Beard (November 27, 1874 _ September 1, 1948) was an American historian, author with James Harvey Robinson of The Development of Modern Europe (1907). ... George Sylvester Counts (b. ... Daniel Bell Daniel Bell (born 10 May 1919) is a sociologist and professor emeritus at Harvard University. ... Charles Wright Mills (August 28, 1916, Waco, Texas – March 20, 1962, West Nyack, New York) was an American sociologist. ... This article is about the sociologist. ... Image needed Paul Felix Lazarsfeld (1901-1976) was one of the major figures in 20th century American Sociology. ... Meyer Schapiro was a 20th century art historian. ... This article is about the social science. ... Franz Boas Franz Boas (July 9, 1858 – December 21, 1942[1]) was one of the pioneers of modern anthropology and is often called the Father of American Anthropology. Born in Germany, Boas worked for most of his life in North America. ... Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901, Philadelphia – November 15, 1978, New York City) was an American cultural anthropologist. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Fermi redirects here. ... John Ray Dunning (September 24, 1907 - August 25, 1975) was a US physicist who played a key role in the development of the atomic bomb. ... Isidor Isaac Rabi (July 29, 1898 - January 11, 1988) was an American physicist of Austro-Hungarian origin. ... Polykarp Kusch (January 26, 1911 - March 20, 1993) was a German-American physicist who, with Willis Eugene Lamb, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1955 for his accurate determination that the magnetic moment of the electron was greater than its theoretical value, thus leading to reconsideration of and... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ... William Maurice Doc Ewing (May 12, 1906 – May 4, 1974) was an American geophysicist and oceanographer. ... Thomas Hunt Morgan (September 25, 1866 – December 4, 1945) was an American geneticist and embryologist. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ... Chiang Yee (born 1903) is a Chinese poet, author, painter and calligrapher. ... Frank (Frantisek) Daniel was born on 14 April 1926 in Kolin, Czech Republic. ... In film parlance, a sequence is a series of scenes which comprise a distinct narrative unit, usually connected either by unity of location or unity of time. ...


More recently, architects Bernard Tschumi, Santiago Calatrava and Frank Gehry have taught at the school. The postcolonial scholar Edward Said taught at Columbia, where he spent virtually the entirety of his academic career, until his death in 2003. Bernard Tschumi (born January 25, 1944 Lausanne, Switzerland) is an architect, writer, and educator. ... Santiago Calatrava Valls (born July 28, 1951) is an internationally recognized and award-winning Spanish architect and structural engineer whose principal office is in Zurich, Switzerland. ... Frank Owen Gehry, CC (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg, February 28, 1929) is a Pritzker Prize winning architect based in Los Angeles, California. ... Edward Wadie Saïd, Arabic: , , (1 November 1935 – 25 September 2003) was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and Palestinian activist. ...


Today, celebrated faculty members include string-theory expert Brian Greene, Ricci flow inventor Richard Hamilton, American historian Eric Foner, Middle Eastern studies expert Richard Bulliet, Eric Kandel, a Nobel prize winner who conducted fundamental research in neuroscience, New York City historian Kenneth T. Jackson, Je Tsong Khapa Professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies Robert Thurman, composers Tristan Murail, Fred Lerdahl and George Lewis, literary theorist Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, philosopher Philip Kitcher, British historian Simon Schama, art historian Rosalind Krauss, director Mira Nair, East Asian studies expert William Theodore de Bary, scientist, critic, writer and physician Oliver Sacks, Turkish author and Nobel prize winner Orhan Pamuk, and economists Jeffrey Sachs, Jagdish Bhagwati, Joseph Stiglitz, Edmund Phelps, Xavier Sala-i-Martin, Robert Mundell. Brian Greene (born February 9, 1963), is a theoretical physicist and one of the best-known string theorists. ... Richard S. Hamilton (b. ... Eric Foner (born February 7, 1943 in New York City) is an American historian. ... Richard W. Bulliet is a professor of history at Columbia University who specializes in the history of Islamic society and institutions, the history of technology, and the history of the role of animals in human society. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Kenneth T. Jackson (b. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Tristan Murail (born March 11, 1947 in Le Havre, France) is a French composer associated with the spectral technique of composition (along with Jonathan Harvey and the late Gérard Grisey), which involves the use of the fundamental properties of sound as a basis for harmony, as well as the... Fred Lerdahl, Fritz Reiner Professor of Musical Composition at Columbia University, is a composer and music theorist, best known for his work on pitch space and cognitive constraints on compositional systems or musical grammars. ... George Lewis is the name of more than one person of note. ... Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (born February 24, 1942) is an Indian literary critic and theorist. ... Philip Stuart Kitcher (born 1947) is a British philosophy professor who specializes in the philosophy of science. ... Simon Schama Simon Michael Schama, CBE (born 13 February 1945) is a professor of history and art history at Columbia University. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Mira Nair (born October 15, 1957 at Rourkela, Orissa) is an India-born, New York-based film director. ... William Theodore de Bary is an East Asian studies expert at Columbia University. ... Oliver Sacks in 2005. ... Ferit Orhan Pamuk (born on June 7, 1952 in Istanbul) is a Nobel Prize-winning Turkish novelist. ... Jeffrey Sachs Jeffrey David Sachs (born November 5, 1954 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American economist known for his work as an economic advisor to governments in Latin America, Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, Asia, and Africa. ... Jagdish Bhagwati (born 1934) is a prominent economist noted for his defense of free trade against the critics of globalization. ... Joseph Stiglitz (born February 9, 1943) is an American economist, author and winner of Nobel Prize for economics ( 2001). ... Edmund Strother Phelps (born July 26, 1933 in Evanston, Illinois) is an American professor of economics at Columbia University, who was awarded the 2006 The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, commonly known as the Nobel Prize in Economics. ... Xavier Sala i Martín (b. ... Robert Alexander Mundell C.C. (born October 24, 1932) is a professor of economics at Columbia University. ...


In November and December, 2006, Václav Havel spent eight weeks as an artist-in-residence at Columbia University.[112] Václav Havel, GCB, CC, (IPA: ) (born October 5, 1936 in Prague) is a Czech writer and dramatist. ... Artist-in-residence programs and other residency opportunities allow artists to stay and work elsewhere for arts sake. They offer conditions that are conducive to creativity and they provide for working facilities, ready to be used by individual artists. ...


Sunil Gulati, President of US Soccer, is a professor of Economics at the University. Sunil Kumar Gulati (born July 30, 1959, in Allahabad, India) is the current president of the United States Soccer Federation or USSF and President of Kraft Soccer for the New England Revolution in Major League Soccer. ... The United States Soccer Federation (USSF) is the official governing body of the sport of soccer in the United States. ...


Fictitious Columbians

In Spider-Man films directed by Sam Raimi, Peter Parker attains his powers after being bitten by a radioactive spider at a Columbia laboratory, and later attends the school. The Marvel Comics superhero Daredevil was valedictorian of his class at Columbia Law School.[113] Willie Keith, the protagonist in Herman Wouk's The Caine Mutiny, is a Columbia student when he signs up for the Navy at the beginning of World War II; Wouk specifically refers to the campus, including buildings such as Furnald Hall. Law & Order prosecutor Jamie Ross (later a judge on Law & Order: Trial by Jury) attended Columbia Law. Meadow Soprano, of the television series The Sopranos, attends Columbia.[114] Michael Moscovitz, a character in the The Princess Diaries series by Meg Cabot, also attends Columbia University. On the NBC sitcom Will & Grace, both main characters, Will Truman and Grace Adler, played by Eric McCormack and Debra Messing, respectively, were Columbia graduates.[citation needed] Jack Shephard (Matthew Fox) from ABC's Lost graduated from Columbia University Medical Center. Jessie Spano from Saved by the Bell attended Columbia University in the show's spin-off. Jessica Darling, the protagonist of Megan McCafferty's Sloppy Firsts, Second Helpings, and Charmed Thirds, attends Columbia. Dr. Joel Fleishman (Rob Morrow) on the television series Northern Exposure was a graduate of Columbia. Valerie Tyler in the TV show What I Like About You is a Columbia graduate.[citation needed] Carol Seaver from the family sitcom Growing Pains (Tracey Gold) also attended the university.[citation needed] In How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, Andie Anderson (Kate Hudson) graduated from Columbia Journalism. In the film I Think I Love My Wife, Richard Cooper (Chris Rock) held an M.B.A. degree from Columbia (An M.B.A. diploma from Columbia can be seen hanging on the wall in the character's office). Marshall Eriksen of How I Met Your Mother is a Columbia Law school graduate.[citation needed] Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... For the American opera singer, see Samuel Ramey. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... Herman Wouk (May 27, 1915 —) is a bestselling American author with a number of notable novels to his credit, including The Caine Mutiny, The Winds of War, and War and Remembrance. ... The Caine Mutiny, a 1954 movie directed by Edward Dmytryk, and based on Herman Wouks Pulitzer Prize-winning (1951), best-selling novel and subsequent stage hit (The Caine Mutiny Court Martial), provided Humphrey Bogart with the next-to-last great role of his acting career and a spectacular comeback... This article is about the original television series. ... ADA Jamie Ross played by Carey Lowell Jamie Ross was a fictional character on the TV drama Law & Order, portrayed by Carey Lowell from 1996 to 1998. ... Law and Order: Trial by Jury is the third spinoff of Law & Order; it focuses on the court room process, as opposed to particular topics of crime. ... Meadow Mariangela Soprano, played by Jamie-Lynn Sigler, is a fictional character on the HBO TV series The Sopranos. ... This article is about the television series. ... This article is about the Meg Cabot novels. ... Meg Cabot (born Meggin Patricia Cabot on February 1, 1967) is a popular American chick-lit author of romantic comedies for teens and adults. ... This article is about the television network. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Will & Grace is a popular American television sitcom that was originally broadcast on NBC from 1998 to 2006. ... William Will Pierce Truman is a fictional character on the American sitcom Will & Grace, portrayed by Eric McCormack. ... Information Nickname(s) Gracie, G, Gracious Gender Unknown Age 30 at series beginning (Series began in March 1998, Grace turned 31 in April 1998), 38 or 39 by series end Date of birth April 26, 1967 Occupation Interior Designer Title Mrs. ... Eric McCormack (born on April 18, 1963 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian actor of Scottish and Cherokee Canadian descent. ... Debra Lynn Messing (born August 15, 1968) is an Emmy Award-winning American actress, known for portraying Grace Adler in Will & Grace and for appearing in a series of film roles. ... This article is about the Lost character. ... Matthew Fox (born July 14, 1966) is an actor and former model. ... LOST redirects here. ... Columbia University Medical Center is name of the medical complex associated with Columbia University located in Washington Heights area of Manhattan. ... Saved by the Bell was a popular teen sitcom which ran from 1989 to 1993 and built a large, loyal fanbase. ... Saved by the Bell is an American dramatic sitcom that originally aired between 1989 and 1993. ... Jessica Darling is the fictional protagonist in Megan McCaffertys first three novels: Sloppy Firsts, Second Helpings, and Charmed Thirds. ... Megan McCafferty (also known as Megan Fitzmorris McCafferty) is a contemporary U.S. author most known for her series of books about Jessica Darling, a witty teenage heroine. ... Rob Morrow Rob Morrow (born September 21, 1962 in New Rochelle, New York) is an American actor currently starring in the television program Numb3rs. ... This article is about the TV series; there is also a mix album of the same name. ... What I Like About You is an American television sitcom set mainly in New York City and follows the lives of two sisters, Valerie Tyler (Jennie Garth) and Holly Tyler (Amanda Bynes). ... For other uses, see Growing Pains (disambiguation). ... Cover of Tracey Golds 2003 book. ... How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days is an American 2003 motion picture. ... This article is about the actress. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Christopher Julius Rock III[5] (born February 7, 1965)[6][7] is an Emmy Award winning American comedian, actor, screenwriter, television producer, film producer and director. ... MBA redirects here. ... Information Nickname(s) Marsh-mallow Gender Male Occupation Lawyer Spouse(s) Lily Aldrin(wife) Relatives Marvin Eriksen Sr. ... How I Met Your Mother (HIMYM) is a CBS sitcom that premiered on September 19, 2005. ...


In film, television, and the arts

Movies featuring scenes shot on the Morningside campus include:

Scarlett Johansson at Columbia University during the shooting of The Nanny Diaries.
One of the fountains in Columbia University

Movies or shows with significant portrayals of Columbia alumni or students: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 888 KB) Summary Taken by vedantm, 26 April 2006 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 888 KB) Summary Taken by vedantm, 26 April 2006 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Scarlett Johansson (born November 22, 1984) is an American actress. ... The Nanny Diaries is a 2007 comedy-drama film, based on the novel The Nanny Diaries, by Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 206 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)A fountain at Columbia University I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 206 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)A fountain at Columbia University I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the... 3 lbs is a drama on CBS that began on November 14, 2006, replacing the cancelled series Smith, but itself was cancelled three weeks later due to poor ratings. ... A Midsummer Nights Sex Comedy is a 1982 film written and directed by Woody Allen. ... Altered States is the name of both a novel (ISBN 0060107278) and a film adaptation of that novel, both written by Paddy Chayefsky. ... This article is about the psychotherapy technique. ... This article is about a 1990 film. ... Black and White is a 1999 movie directed by James Toback, starring a cast of young actors and celebrities including Elijah Wood, Claudia Schiffer, Brooke Shields, and a number of rap musicians. ... Casino Royale (2006) is the twenty-first film in the James Bond series and the first to star Daniel Craig as MI6 agent James Bond. ... Crimes and Misdemeanors is a film written and directed by Woody Allen. ... Cruising is the name of a film released in 1980, directed by William Friedkin and starring Al Pacino. ... Enchanted is a 2007 musical film, directed by Kevin Lima and produced by Walt Disney Pictures and Josephson Entertainment. ... Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is an Academy Award-winning 2004 American romance film by director Michel Gondry. ... Everyone Says I Love You (1996) is a musical film written and directed by Woody Allen. ... For other uses, see Ghostbusters (disambiguation). ... Ghostbusters II is the 1989 sequel to Ghostbusters (1984). ... Hannah and Her Sisters is a 1986 romantic comedy film which tells the intertwined stories of an extended family, told mostly during a year that begins and ends with a family Thanksgiving dinner. ... Hitch is a 2005 romantic comedy film starring Will Smith, Eva Mendes, Kevin James and Amber Valletta. ... K-PAX (2001) is a mystery and/or sci-fi drama about a mental patient who claims he is an alien. ... Kabhi Alvida Na Kehna (English: Never say goodbye) is a forthcoming movie produced and directed by Karan Johar. ... Kinsey film poster Kinsey is a 2004 semi-biographical film written and directed by Bill Condon. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Manhattan is a 1979 romantic comedy film. ... Marathon Man is a 1976 film based on the novel of the same name by William Goldman. ... The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996) is a romantic comedy movie starred and directed by Barbra Streisand. ... Mona Lisa Smile is a 2003 American film that was produced by Revolution Studios and Columbia Pictures, directed by Mike Newell, written by Lawrence Konner and Mark Rosenthal, and starring Julia Roberts, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Kirsten Dunst, and Julia Stiles. ... The Nanny Diaries is a 2007 comedy-drama film, based on the novel The Nanny Diaries, by Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus. ... New York Minute poster. ... Porn n Chicken was a club based at Yale University. ... Promotional poster for This article is about the film. ... Simon is a common name, from Hebrew שִׁמְעוֹן (Shimon), meaning hearkening or listening.[1]. Simon can refer to: // Simeon II of Bulgaria Simon of Bet-Titta, a Christian martyr Simon of Bet-Parsaje, a martyr of Iran with Mana of Bet-Parsaje Simon of Sudbury Simon, Metropolitan of Moscow Simon... Spider-Man is a 2002 American superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... This article is about the 2004 film. ... Look up stay in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Tadpole is the title of a movie released in 2002, directed by Gary Winick. ... 13 Conversations About One Thing is a 2001 film by Jill Sprecher. ... West Side Story is a 1961 film directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins. ...

Currently shooting on or near the University's campus: Marathon Man is a 1976 film based on the novel of the same name by William Goldman. ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... Husbands and Wives is a 1992 American film directed and written by Woody Allen. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... Juliette L. Lewis (born June 21, 1973)[1] is an Academy Award-nominated American actress and musician. ... Finding Forrester is a 2000 movie, written by Mike Rich and directed by Gus Van Sant, about a teenager, Jamal Wallace, played by Rob Brown, who is accepted into a prestigious private high school. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) (pronounced ) is an American author best known for his 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye and his reclusive nature. ... Hitch is a 2005 romantic comedy film starring Will Smith, Eva Mendes, Kevin James and Amber Valletta. ... “W. S.” redirects here. ... Igby Goes Down is a 2002 film that follows the life of Igby Slocumb. ... The Pride of the Yankees is a 1942 biographical film directed by Sam Wood about the New York Yankees star baseball player, first baseman Lou Gehrig, who had his Hall-of-Fame career tragically cut short at 36 years of age when he was stricken with the fatal disease amyotrophic... Quiz Show is a 1994 film which tells the true story of the Twenty One quiz show scandal of the 1950s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Twenty One host Jack Barry (center), with contestants Vivienne Nearing and Charles Van Doren Twenty One was an American game show. ... America Ferrera as Ana Garcia in Real Women Have Curves Real Women Have Curves is a 2002 American movie starring America Ferrera. ... The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants is a novel written in 2001 by Ann Brashares. ... This article is about the television series. ... Anthony John Soprano, Sr. ... Nip/Tuck is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American television medical drama series created by Ryan Murphy for FX Networks. ... Vanessa Redgrave during the 2004 season of Nip/Tuck. ... The Rock (1996) is an Academy Award nominated action film that primarily takes place on Alcatraz Island, and the San Francisco Bay area. ... Will & Grace is a popular American television sitcom that was originally broadcast on NBC from 1998 to 2006. ... William Will Pierce Truman is a fictional character on the American sitcom Will & Grace, portrayed by Eric McCormack. ... Information Nickname(s) Gracie, G, Gracious Gender Unknown Age 30 at series beginning (Series began in March 1998, Grace turned 31 in April 1998), 38 or 39 by series end Date of birth April 26, 1967 Occupation Interior Designer Title Mrs. ... Saved by the Bell is an American dramatic sitcom that originally aired between 1989 and 1993. ... Saved by the Bell was a popular teen sitcom which ran from 1989 to 1993 and built a large, loyal fanbase. ... How I Met Your Mother (HIMYM) is a CBS sitcom that premiered on September 19, 2005. ... LOST redirects here. ... Matthew Fox (born July 14, 1966) is an actor and former model. ... Clark and Michael is a CBS Internet television series created by and starring Clark Duke and Michael Cera. ...

  • August Rush
  • What I Like About You- Val's character is an alumna of Columbia, and Holly goes for an interview at the campus, but then decided the college isn't right for her.
  • 7th Heaven - Matt and Sarah (Glass) Camden were students here until they graduated just after the 10th season finale.

Recording artist Nellie McKay has released a song on her second album Pretty Little Head, entitled "Columbia Is Bleeding", discusses alleged animal abuse as part of the practice of animal testing at Columbia University. August Rush is a 2007 Academy Award-nominated drama directed by Kirsten Sheridan and written by Nick Castle, James V. Hart, Kirsten Sheridan and Paul Castro, and produced by Richard Barton Lewis. ... What I Like About You is an American television sitcom set mainly in New York City and follows the lives of two sisters, Valerie Tyler (Jennie Garth) and Holly Tyler (Amanda Bynes). ... This article is about the TV program. ... Barry Watson starred as Matthew Mark Camden (born circa 1980), the eldest son and child of the Camden family, on The WB show 7th Heaven from 1996-2002 (seasons 1-6). ... For the African-American literature scholar, see Nellie Y. McKay. ... Pretty Little Head is the second album by singer Nellie McKay planned for an October 31st release date on Nellies own Hungry Mouse label. ... For other uses, see Animal testing (disambiguation). ...


In geography

The Columbia Glacier, one of the largest in Alaska's College Fjord, is named after the university, where it sits among other glaciers named for the Ivy League and Seven Sisters schools. Mount Columbia in the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness of Colorado also takes its name from the university and is situated among peaks named for Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Oxford. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... College Fjord is a fjord located in the northern sector of Prince William Sound, Alaska. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts womens colleges in the Northern United States. ... Mount Columbia is a mountain in the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness area of Colorado, United States. ... The Collegiate Peaks Wilderness is a 168,000 acre area located in central Colorado between Leadville and Buena Vista to the east and Aspen to the west and Crested Butte to the southwest. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Mount Harvard (elevation 14,420 ft) is the third highest mountain the U.S. state of Colorado. ... Mount Yale is one of nine fourteeners in the Collegiate Peaks, in the central part of the Sawatch Range near Buena Vista, Colorado. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


See also

Education in New York City is provided by a vast number of public and private institutions. ... This is a partially sorted list of notable persons who have had ties to Columbia University. ... The following list contains only notable graduates and former students of Columbia College, the undergraduate liberal arts division of Columbia University, and its predecessor, from 1754 to 1776, Kings College. ... This is a list of individuals who have attended Columbia Law School. ... The following list provides information on nobel laureates and their affiliation to academic institutions. ... Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily newspaper, written by Columbia University undergraduates, servicing the university community and the neighborhood of Morningside Heights. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The Blue & White is a Columbia University undergraduate literary magazine founded in 1890. ... WKCR is a college radio station in New York City. ... Jester of Columbia cover from April, 2006 The Jester of Columbia, or simply the Jester , is a humor magazine at Columbia University in New York City. ... The Varsity Show, founded in 1894, is one of the oldest traditions at Columbia University, and certainly its oldest performing arts tradition. ... The Philolexian Society of Columbia University in the City of New York is one of the oldest collegiate literary societies in the United States, and the oldest student group at Columbia. ... The Columbia Encyclopedia is a one-volume encyclopedia produced by Columbia University Press and sold by the Gale Group. ... A map of the Columbia University tunnels Columbia University has an extensive tunnel system connecting most buildings on campus and acting as conduits for steam, electricity, telecommunications, and other infrastructure. ... The Columbia University Library System, with over 9. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... The Medical School for International Health is a collaboration between Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Faculty of Health Sciences and Columbia University Medical Center to graduate doctors with special skills in primary care and community, preventive, and population-based medicine. ... Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize for Biology or Biochemistry is an annual prize awarded by Columbia University to a researcher or group of researchers that have made an outstanding contribution in basic research in the fields of biology or biochemistry. ... Go Ask Alice! is a Q&A service provided by Columbia University for both students and the general public with questions or curiosity about health topics. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Bancroft Prize was established in 1948 with a bequest from Frederic Bancroft and is awarded by Columbia University for books about diplomacy or about the history of the Americas which were first published the year before. ... Goddard Institute for Space Studies building. ... The biennial John Bates Clark Medal is awarded by the American Economic Association to that American economist under the age of forty who is adjudged to have made a significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge. Named after the American Neoclassical economist John Bates Clark (1847-1938), it is considered... The Columbia University Marching Band The Columbia University Marching Band (CUMB) has performed for Columbia University since 1904. ...

References

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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is a professional body for architects in the United Kingdom. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Robert A. McCaughey: Stand, Columbia: A History of Columbia University in the City of New York, 1754-2004, Columbia University Press, 2003, ISBN 0231130082
  • Living Legacies at Columbia, ed. by Wm Theodore De Bary, Columbia University Press, 2006, ISBN 0231138849

External links

  • Columbia University - Official website
  • Columbia Libraries
  • Admissions
  • Columbia Daily Spectator - Student newspaper
  • Columbia Connection - Alumni website
  • Columbia Athletics
  • The School At Columbia, A school for Columbia Faculty and for neighborhood children
  • Columbia University is at coordinates 40°48′32″N 73°57′44″W / 40.808783, -73.962278 (Columbia University)Coordinates: 40°48′32″N 73°57′44″W / 40.808783, -73.962278 (Columbia University)
For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym: IPA pronunciation: ), is the public university system of New York City. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... Long Island University (LIU) is a private university located on Long Island in the U.S. state of New York. ... The New School is an institution of higher learning in New York City, located around Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Pace redirects here. ... St. ... Touro College is a Jewish-sponsored independent institution of higher and professional education, in New York City, New York, United States. ... Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... Boricua College is a post-secondary educational institution located in New York City. ... The Kings College is a small Christian institution of higher education, founded by Percy Crawford in Briarcliff Manor, Westchester, in 1938. ... The main entrance to Manhattan College Manhattan College is a Roman Catholic liberal arts college in the Lasallian tradition in New York City. ... Marymount Manhattan College is a liberal arts college located in Manhattan, New York City, New York. ... The main entrance of the College of Mount Saint Vincent The College of Mount Saint Vincent is a Catholic liberal arts college located in the Riverdale section of The Bronx, New York. ... St. ... Saint Josephs College, New York is a private Roman Catholic College in New York, with its main campus located in the borough of Brooklyn, and a branch campus located in Suffolk County, Patchogue, New York. ... Wagner College is a coeducational private liberal arts college located on Staten Island in New York City. ... The American Musical and Dramatic Academy, or AMDA, is a school for the performing arts located New York City, New York, with a satellite campus in Los Angeles, California. ... The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art is a privately funded college in Lower Manhattan of New York City. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Juilliard School is one of the worlds premier performing arts conservatories, in New York City. ... The Manhattan School of Music is one of Americas leading music conservatories located in New York City that offers degrees on the bachelors, masters, and doctoral levels in the areas of classical and jazz performance and composition. ... The New York Institute of Technology (also known as NYIT and New York Tech) is a private, co-educational college in New York in the USA. The college has three New York campuses, two on Long Island and one on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, as well as global... Pratt Institute is a specialized, private college in New York City with campuses in Manhattan and Brooklyn, as well as in Utica, New York. ... The School of Visual Arts (SVA), is an art school in Manhattan, New York City and is one of the nations leading independent colleges of art and design. ... Albert Einstein College of Medicine logo For the engineering company, see AECOM The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) is a graduate school of Yeshiva University. ... Brooklyn Law School Brooklyn Law School (BLS) is a law school located in downtown Brooklyn, New York. ... This page is about a medical school in New York. ... Beth Israel Medical Center is a hospital in New York. ... New York Law School is a private law school in Lower Manhattan in New York City. ... Founders Hall Rockefeller University is a private university focusing primarily on graduate and postgraduate education research in the biomedical fields, located between 63rd and 68th Streets along York Avenue, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan island in New York City, New York. ... The State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, better known as SUNY Downstate Medical Center, is an academic medical center and is the only one of its kind in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, formerly named the Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University and abbreviated to Weill Cornell, is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... Berkeley College is a private college specializing in business, with five campuses in New York and New Jersey. ... Bramson ORT College is an undergraduate college in New York City operated by the American branch of the Jewish charity World ORT. Its main campus is in Forest Hills, Queens, with a satellite campus in Brooklyn. ... Briarcliffe College consists of a pair of for-profit career colleges in Bethpage and Patchogue on Long Island, New York. ... Founded in 1964,[1] Metropolitan College of New York is comprised of the School for Business, the Audrey Cohen School for Human Services and Education, and the School for Public Affairs and Administration. ... Monroe College is a private college with campuses in the Bronx and New Rochelle, New York. ... SUNY Maritime College SUNY Maritime College Seal SUNY Maritime College is located in the Bronx, New York City in historic Fort Schuyler on the Throggs Neck peninsula where the East River meets Long Island Sound. ... Formerly known as the College of Aeronautics, Vaughn College of Aeronautics & Technology is a specialized college located in Queens County, New York in New York City. ... The Bank Street College of Education is located in upper Manhattan in New York City. ... For other meanings of the word Bard, see Bard (disambiguation). ... The General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church is located in Chelsea, Manhattan in New York. ... The Jewish Theological Seminary of America The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, known in the Jewish community simply as JTS, is one of the academic and spiritual centers of Conservative Judaism. ... The tower at Union Theological Seminary Birds-eye view at Claremont Ave. ...

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