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Encyclopedia > Columbia Records
Columbia Records
Parent company Sony BMG
Founded 1888
Distributing label Columbia Records (In the U.S. and U.K.)
Genre(s) Various
Country of origin U.S.
Official Website Official website of Columbia Records

Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. Today it is a premier subsidiary label of Sony BMG Music Entertainment, Inc. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1122x1122, 46 KB)Logo of Columbia Records, .png from an . ... Bertelsmann is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in G tersloh, Germany. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Motto  2(French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen 3 United Kingdom() – on the European continent() – in the European Union() [] Capital London Largest conurbation (population) Greater London Urban Area Official languages English (de facto)4 Government  -  Monarch Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair Formation  -  Acts of Union... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... This article is about brands in marketing. ... Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Bertelsmann is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in G tersloh, Germany. ...

Contents

Early history

Columbia was originally the local company distributing and selling Edison phonographs and phonograph cylinders in Washington, DC, Maryland and Delaware, and derives its name from the District of Columbia, which was its headquarters. As was the custom of some of the regional phonograph companies, Columbia produced many commercial cylinder recordings of its own, and its catalogue of musical records in 1891 was 10 pages long. Columbia severed its ties to Edison and the North American Phonograph Company in 1893, and thereafter sold only records and phonographs of its own manufacture. Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman who developed many devices which greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph and a long lasting light bulb. ... Edison cylinder phonograph ca. ... The earliest method of recording and reproducing sound was on phonograph cylinders. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... Official language(s) None Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Area  Ranked 49th  - Total 2,491 sq mi (6,452 km²)  - Width 30 miles (48 km)  - Length 100 miles (161 km)  - % water 21. ... ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Columbia began selling disc records and phonographs in addition to the cylinder system in 1901. For a decade, Columbia competed with both the Edison Phonograph Company cylinders and the Victor Talking Machine Company disc records as one of the top three names in recorded sound. In 1908 Columbia introduced mass production of "Double Sided" disc records, with recordings stamped into both sides of the disc. It has been suggested that Childrens gramophone records be merged into this article or section. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Edison Records was the first record label, pioneering recorded sound and an important player in the early record industry. ... Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


During this early period, Columbia used the famous "Magic Notes" logo--a pair of sixteenth notes in a circle—both in the United States and overseas (where this logo would never substantially change). Figure 1. ...


In July 1912, Columbia decided to concentrate exclusively on disc records and stopped recording new cylinder records and manufacturing cylinder phonographs although they continued pressing and selling cylinder records from their back catalogue for a year or two more. 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Label of a Bessie Smith Columbia disc from 1925. This striking "banner" design was one of the first multicolor label designs and remains popular with record collectors.
Label of a Bessie Smith Columbia disc from 1925. This striking "banner" design was one of the first multicolor label designs and remains popular with record collectors.

On February 25, 1925, Columbia began recording with the new electric recording process licensed from Western Electric. The new "Viva-tonal" records set a benchmark in tone and clarity unequalled during the 78 era. The first electrical recordings were made by Art Gillham, the popular "Whispering Pianist." In a secret agreement with Victor, both companies did not make the new recording technology public knowledge for some months, in order not to hurt sales of their existing acoustically recorded catalogue while a new electrically recorded catalogue was being built. Label of a Columbia Records 78 record label from 1925. ... Label of a Columbia Records 78 record label from 1925. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... // February 25 - Art Gillham - The Whispering Pianist records the first electrical recordings to be released for Columbia using the Western Electric system (Master 140125-7 issued on Columbia 328-D). ... Company Masthead Logo Logo until circa 1969, also current logo on company web site Logo 1969-1983 Western Electric (sometimes abbreviated WE and WECo) was an American electrical engineering company, the manufacturing arm of AT&T from 1881 to 1995. ... Art Gillham, (born January 1, 1895 in St. ...


In 1926, Columbia acquired Okeh Records and its growing stable of jazz and blues artists including Louis Armstrong. In 1928, Paul Whiteman, the nation's most popular orchestra leader, left Victor to record for Columbia. That same year, Columbia executive Frank Buckley Walker pioneered some of the first country music or "hillbilly" genre recordings in Johnson City, Tennessee including artists such as Clarence Green and the legendary fiddler and entertainer, Charlie Bowman. 1929 saw industry legend Ben Selvin signing on as house bandleader and A. & R. director. Other favorites in the Viva-tonal era included Ruth Etting, Fletcher Henderson and Ted Lewis. Columbia kept using acoustic recording for "budget label" pop product well into 1929 on the Harmony and Velvet Tone labels. 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Okeh Records began as an independent record label based in the United States of America in 1918; from the late 1920s on was a subsidiary of Columbia Records. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 1928 Columbia Records label with caricature of Paul Whiteman Paul Whiteman (March 28, 1890 – December 29, 1967) was a popular american orchestral leader. ... Johnson City is a city in Washington County, Tennessee; however a small part of the city is located within Sullivan County, Tennessee, to the northeast and Carter County, Tennessee, to the southeast. ... Ben Selvin (March 5, 1898 - July 15, 1980), son of Russian-immigrant Jewish parents, started his professional life at age 15 as a fiddle player in New York City night clubs. ... Ruth Etting on the cover of Radio Mirror magazine, June 1932. ... Fletcher Hamilton Henderson, Jr. ... There have been several people of note called Ted Lewis. ...


Columbia ownership separation

In 1931, the English Columbia Graphophone Company merged with the Gramophone Company to form Electric & Musical Industries Ltd. (EMI). EMI was forced to sell its American Columbia operations because of anti-trust concerns to the Grigsby-Grunow Company, makers of the Majestic Radio. But Majestic soon fell on hard times. A notable marketing ploy was the Columbia "Royal Blue Record," a brilliant blue laminated product with matching label. Made from 1932-'35, the Royal Blue issues are particularly popular with collectors for their rarity and musical interest. An abortive gimmick was the "Longer Playing Record," a finer-grooved 10" 78 with 4:30 to 5:00 playing time per side. The Columbia Graphophone Company was one of the earliest gramophone companies in the United Kingdom. ... The Gramophone Company, based in the United Kingdom, was one of the early recording companies. ... The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is a British music company comprising of the major record company EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Brook Green in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based on Charing Cross Road, London. ...


But nothing slowed Columbia's decline in a day when the phonograph itself had become a passé luxury. In 1934, Grigsby-Grunow went under and was forced to sell Columbia for a mere $75,000 to the American Record Corporation (ARC). This combine already included Brunswick as its premium label, and Columbia was relegated to slower sellers such as the Hawaiian music of Andy Iona and the still unknown Benny Goodman. By late 1936, pop releases were discontinued, leaving the label essentially defunct. The American Record Company, often known as ARC Records or simply ARC, was a United States based record company. ... The Brunswick Records logo Brunswick Records is a United States based record label. ... Andy Iona (1902 - 1966) was an American musician and one of Hawaiis most influential musicians. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


CBS takes over

Columbia "notes and mike" logo
Columbia "notes and mike" logo

In 1938 ARC, including the Columbia label in the USA, was bought by William S. Paley of the Columbia Broadcasting System for US$700,000. (CBS had originally been co-founded by Columbia Records, who soon cashed out leaving only the name.) CBS revived the Columbia label in place of Brunswick and the Okeh label in place of Vocalion. The Columbia trademark from this point until the late 1950s was two overlapping circles with the Magic Notes in the left circle and a CBS microphone in the right circle. The Royal Blue labels now disappeared in favor of a deep red, which caused RCA Victor to claim infringement on its "Red Seal" trademark. (RCA lost the case.) The blue Columbia label was kept for its classical music Columbia Masterworks Records line which was later changed to green label before switching to a gray label in the late 1950s, then to the bronze that is familiar to owners of its classical and Broadway albums. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... William S. Paley (1901-1990) This article is about the broadcast executive. ... CBSs first color logo, which debuted in the fall of 1965. ... 1921 Vocalion label Vocalion Records was a record label historically active in the United States and in the United Kingdom. ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Columbia Masterworks Records is a subsidiary of Columbia Records. ...


The LP Record

At this time, Columbia's president, Edward (Ted) Wallerstein, instrumental in steering Paley to the ARC purchase, set his talents to the goal (as he saw it) of hearing an entire movement of a symphony on one side of an album. Ward Botsford writing for the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Issue of "High Fidelity Magazine", relates, "He was no inventor—he was simply a man who seized an idea whose time was ripe and begged, ordered, and cajoled a thousand men into bringing into being the now accepted medium of the record business." Resulting from Wallerstein's brief and stormy tenure, in 1948 Columbia introduced the Long Playing microgroove (LP) record (sometimes in early advertisements Lp) format, which rotated at 33⅓ revolutions per minute, which became the standard for the gramophone record for half a century. CBS research director Dr. Peter Goldmark played a managerial role in the collaborative effort, but Wallerstein credits engineer Bill Savory with the technical prowess that brought the long-playing disc to the public. 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... Revolutions per minute (abbreviated rpm, RPM, r/min, or min-1) is a unit of frequency, commonly used to measure rotational speed, in particular in the case of rotation around a fixed axis. ... Peter Goldmark, Columbia Records engineer and developer of the long-playing 33-1/3 rpm vinyl discs which defined home audio for two generations. ...


Columbia's LPs were particularly well-suited to classical music's long pieces, so some of the early albums featured such artists as Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra, Bruno Walter and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, and Sir Thomas Beecham and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. The success of these recordings eventually persuaded RCA Victor to begin releasing LPs in 1950, quickly followed by other major American labels. Eugene Ormandy (November 18, 1899, Budapest, Hungary – March 12, 1985, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an eminent American orchestral conductor. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... Bruno Walter (September 15, 1876 – February 17, 1962) was a German-born conductor and composer. ... The New York Philharmonic is an American orchestra based in New York City. ... Thomas Beecham (April 29, 1879 - March 8, 1961) was a British conductor. ... The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) is an English orchestra based in London. ...


The 1950s

In 1951, Columbia USA severed its decades-long distribution arrangement with EMI and signed a distribution deal with Philips Records to market Columbia recordings outside North America. EMI continued to distribute Okeh and later Epic label recordings for several years into the 1960s. Philips Records is a record label that was founded by Dutch electronics giant Philips. ...


Columbia became the most successful record company in the 1950s when they hired impresario Mitch Miller away from the Mercury label. Miller quickly signed on Mercury's biggest artist at the time, Frankie Laine, and discovered several of the decade's biggest recording stars including Tony Bennett, Guy Mitchell, Johnnie Ray, The Four Lads, Rosemary Clooney and Johnny Mathis. In 1953, CBS formed Columbia's sister label Epic Records. Mitch Miller (born Mitchell William Miller on July 4, 1911 to a Jewish family in Rochester, New York), is remembered as one of the best-selling recording artists of the 1950s and early 60s. ... Frankie Laine, born Francesco Paolo LoVecchio (March 30, 1913 – February 6, 2007), was one of the most successful American singers of the twentieth century. ... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ... Guy Mitchell (February 22, 1927-July 1, 1999) was an American pop singer, who was even more successful in the United Kingdom than his homeland, despite being an international recording star of the 1950s with five #1 singles. ... Johnnie Ray from the trailer for one of his few films, Theres No Business Like Show Business (1954) John Alvin Ray (January 10, 1927–February 24, 1990) was an American singer, songwriter and pianist. ... The Four Lads, in a 50s nostalgia concert which aired on PBS. The Four Lads were a singing group. ... Rosemary Clooney (May 23, 1928 – June 29, 2002) was an American popular singer and actress. ... John Royce Mathis (b. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Epic Records is an American record label, owned and operated by Sony BMG. // Epic was launched originally as a jazz and classical music label in 1953 by CBS. Its bright-yellow, black and blue logo became a familiar trademark for many jazz and classical releases. ...


In 1955, Columbia USA decisively broke with its past when it replaced the microphone/"Magic Notes" logo with a new, modernist-style "Walking Eye" logo. This logo actually depicts a stylus (the legs) on a record (the eye); however, the "eye" also subtly refers to CBS's main business in television, and that division's iconic Eye logo. The original Walking Eye was tall and solid; it was modified in 1960 to the familiar one still used today (pictured on this page). This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ...


Columbia began recording in stereo in early 1957. As with RCA Victor, most of the early stereo recordings were of classical artists, including the New York Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Bruno Walter, Dmitri Mitropoulos, and Leonard Bernstein, and the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Eugene Ormandy. Some sessions were made with the Columbia Symphony Orchestra, an ensemble drawn from leading New York musicians, which had first made recordings with Sir Thomas Beecham in 1949 in Columbia's famous New York City studios. George Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra recorded mostly for Epic. When Epic dropped classical music, the roster and catalogue was moved to Columbia Masterworks Records. Bruno Walter (September 15, 1876 – February 17, 1962) was a German-born conductor and composer. ... Dimitris Mitropoulos (Greek: Δημήτρης Μητρόπουλος) (March 1, 1896 – November 2, 1960) was a Greek conductor, pianist, and composer who spent most of his career in the United States. ... Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Eugene Ormandy (November 18, 1899, Budapest, Hungary – March 12, 1985, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an eminent American orchestral conductor. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... Columbia Masterworks Records is a subsidiary of Columbia Records. ...


The 1960s

CBS Records logo
CBS Records logo

In 1961, CBS ended its arrangement with Philips Records and formed its own international organization, CBS Records, which released Columbia recordings outside the USA and Canada on the CBS label. When Epic's distribution deal with EMI expired, CBS Records distributed Epic recordings on the Epic label outside North America as well. Epic distributed Ode Records between 1967-1969 and between 1976-1979 Image File history File links CBSRecords. ... Image File history File links CBSRecords. ... Ode Records was started by Lou Adler in 1967 after he sold Dunhill Records to ABC Records. ...


In the early 1960s CBS began expanding its music division into overseas territories. In 1961 CBS took over the Australian Record Company (ARC), one of the leading Australian independent recording and distribution companies of the day. ARC continued trading under that name until the late 1970s when it formally changed its business name to CBS Australia.


In 1962, Columbia joined in the then red hot folk music genre by releasing debut albums by the New Christy Minstrels and, more significantly, Bob Dylan. “Folk song” redirects here. ... The New Christy Minstrels were a 1960s a popular folk group reknown for a rousing and clean-cut sound. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is a Grammy, Golden Globe and Academy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, author, musician, and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ...


In September 1964, CBS established its own British distribution by purchasing its British distributor, the independent Oriole Records (UK) label, pressing plant and recording studio (as well as its sold-only-in-Woolworth's Embassy cover version label).[1] Oriole Records was a small British record label founded in 1927 by the London-based Levy Company, which owned a gramophone record subsidiary called Levaphone. It recorded popular music in England, and also issued masters from United States Vocalion Records. ...


In 1966, another Columbia subsidiary label, Date, was created mainly for the soul music outlet. This label released the first string of hits for Peaches & Herb. Date's biggest success was Time Of The Season by The Zombies, peaking at #2 in 1969. The label was discontinued in 1971. Peaches & Herb are a vocalist duo, once comprising Herb Fame, and Francine Peaches Hurd Barker. ... The Zombies, formed in 1961 in St Albans, were an English pop-rock band. ...


Following the appointment of Clive Davis as president in 1967 the Columbia label became more of a rock music label, thanks mainly to Davis's fortuitous decision to attend the Monterey International Pop Festival, where he spotted and signed several leading acts including Janis Joplin. However, Columbia/CBS still had a hand in traditional pop and jazz and one of its key acquisitions during this period was Barbra Streisand. She released her first solo album on Columbia in 1963 and remains with the label to this day. Clive Jay Davis (born April 4, 1932) is a Grammy Award winning record producer and a leading music industry executive. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... The Monterey International Pop Music Festival took place from June 16 to June 18, 1967. ... Janis Lyn Joplin (19th January, 1943 – 4 October 1970) was an American blues-influenced rock singer and occasional songwriter with a distinctive voice. ... Barbra Joan Streisand (born April 24, 1942) is an Academy Award-winning American singer, theatre and film actress, composer, liberal political activist, film producer and director. ...


Perhaps the most successful Columbia pop act of this period was Simon & Garfunkel. The group broke through in 1965 with the Tom Wilson-produced single "The Sound of Silence", which helped to usher in the so-called "folk-rock" boom of the mid-Sixties, and whose valedictory 1970 LP Bridge Over Troubled Water became one of the biggest selling albums ever released up to that time. Bridge Over Troubled Water was Simon and Garfunkels last album; the title track was their only number one hit in the United Kingdom. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The Sound of Silence is the song that propelled the 1960s folk music duo Simon and Garfunkel to popularity. ... Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Bridge Over Troubled Water is an album by Simon and Garfunkel released on January 26, 1970. ...


The CBS Records group was led very successfully by Clive Davis until his shock dismissal in 1972, after it was discovered that Davis has used CBS funds to finance his personal life, including an expensive bar mitzvah party for his son. He was replaced first by former head Goddard Lieberson then by the colourful and controversial lawyer Walter Yetnikoff, who led the company until his dismissal in 1990. When a Jewish child reaches the age of maturity (12 years and one day for girls, 13 years and one day for boys) that child becomes responsible for him/herself under Jewish law; at this point a boy is said to become Bar Mitzvah (בר מצו&#1493... Goddard Lieberson (April 5, 1911-May 29, 1977) was president of Columbia Records from 1956-71 & 1973-75. ... Walter Yetnikoff is a former Columbia Records/CBS record-label mogul, famed for living la vida coca and generally living life to the full. ...


The structure of US Columbia remained the same until 1980, when it spun off the classical/Broadway unit into a separate imprint, CBS Masterworks Records (now Sony Classical). CBS Masterworks Records was a subsidiary of CBS Records. ...


The 1970s

In the early 1970s, Columbia began recording in a four-channel process called quadraphonic, using the "SQ" standard which used an electronic encoding process that could be decoded by special amplifiers and then played through four speakers, with each speaker placed in the corner of a room. Remarkably, RCA Victor countered with another quadraphonic process which required a special cartridge to play the "discrete" recordings for four-channel playback. Both Columbia and RCA's quadraphonic records could be played on conventional stereo equipment. Although the Columbia process required less equipment and was quite effective, many were confused by the competing systems and sales of both Columbia's matrix recordings and RCA's discrete recordings were disappointing. A few other companies also issued some matrix recordings for a few years. Quadraphonic recording was used by both classical artists, including Leonard Bernstein and Pierre Boulez, and popular artists such as Barbra Streisand and Carlos Santana. 4 channels quadraphonic label Quadraphonic sound uses four channels in which speakers are positioned at all four corners of the listening space, reproducing signals that are independent of each other. ...


The 1980s

In 1988 CBS Records, including the Columbia Records unit, was acquired by Sony, who re-christened the parent division Sony Music Entertainment in 1991. As Sony only had a temporary license on the CBS Records name, it then acquired the rights to the Columbia trademarks outside the U.S., Canada and Japan (Columbia Graphophone) from EMI, which generally had not been used by them since the early 1970s. CBS Masterworks Records was renamed Sony Classical Records. In December 2006, CBS Corporation revived the CBS Records name for a new minor label closely linked with its television properties. 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $68. ... Sony Music Entertainment is a major global record label controlled by the Sony Corporation. ... The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is a British music company comprising of the major record company EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Brook Green in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based on Charing Cross Road, London. ... CBS Masterworks Records was a subsidiary of CBS Records. ... Sony Classical was started in 1927 as Masterworks Records, a subsidiary of the American Columbia Records. ... CBS Corporation (NYSE: CBS) is an American media conglomerate focused on broadcasting, publishing, billboards, and television production, with most of its operations in the United States. ... Columbia Records is the oldest continually used brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888. ...


"Magic Notes" or "Walking Eye"?

The acquisition of rights to the Columbia trademark from EMI (including the "Magic Notes" logo) presented Sony Music with a dilemma. Which logo would prevail? For much of the 1990s, Columbia released their albums without a logo. Columbia experimented with bringing back the "notes and mike" logo but without the CBS mark on the microphone. That logo is currently used in the "Columbia Jazz" series of jazz releases and reissues.[2] A modified "Magic Notes" is found on the logo for Sony Classical. It was eventually decided that the "Walking Eye" (previously the CBS Records logo outside North America) would be Columbia's logo (and the Sony Records logo in Japan) world wide.


Sony BMG consolidation

Sony merged its music division with Bertelsmann AG's BMG unit in 2004; the combined company, Sony BMG, continues to use the Columbia Records name and Walking Eye logo in all markets except Japan (where that division is called Sony Records and is still fully owned by Sony). In Japan, the Columbia trademarks (including a modified Magic Notes logo) is still held by the former Nippon Columbia, now called Columbia Music Entertainment. Currently, Legacy Recordings Sony BMG's catalog division, reissues classic albums for Columbia. Bertelsmann is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in G tersloh, Germany. ... Columbia Music Entertainment TYO: 6791 is a Japanese record label founded in 1910 as the Nippon Phonograph Company. ... Legacy Recordings is the reissue division of Sony BMG Music Entertainment which was founded in 1990 by CBS Records (renamed Sony Music in 1991) to handle reissues of recordings from the vast catalogues of Columbia Records, Epic Records and associated labels. ...


Aware Records

In 1997, Columbia made an affiliation with unsigned artist promotion label Aware Records to distribute Aware's artists music. Through this venture, Columbia has had success finding highly successful artists. In 2002, Columbia and Aware accepted the option to continue this relationship. See also: 1996 in music, other events of 1997, 1998 in music, 1990s in music and the list of years in music // Events January 9 - David Bowie performs his 50th Birthday Bash concert (the day after his birthday) at Madison Square Garden, with guests Frank Black, The Foo Fighters, Sonic... // Aware Records is a record label primarily existent to scout unsigned acts and to promote their initial album releases and increase general overall exposure. ... See also: 2002 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 2002 Record labels established in 2002 other events of 2002 list of years in music 2000s in music // 2002 was marked by significant trends in Rock Music. ...


Further reading

  • Revolution in Sound: A Biography of the Recording Industry. Little, Brown and Company, 1974. ISBN 0-316-77333-6.
  • High Fidelity Magazine, ABC, Inc. April, 1976, "Creating the LP Record."
  • The Columbia Master Book Discography, compiled by Brian Rust. Greenwood Press, 1999.

Previously affiliated labels

Def Jam Recordings is an American based hip-hop record label that operates as a part of The Island Def Jam Music Group, which is owned by Universal Music Group. ... So So Def Recordings is a record label, based out of Atlanta, Georgia and owned by Jermaine Dupri, specializing in Southern hip hop, R&B, and bass music. ... Loud Records is a subsidiary of Arista Records See also List of record labels Categories: Record label stubs | Record labels ... Legacy Recordings is the reissue division of Sony BMG Music Entertainment which was founded in 1990 by CBS Records (renamed Sony Music in 1991) to handle reissues of recordings from the vast catalogues of Columbia Records, Epic Records and associated labels. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sony Music USA - Labels (397 words)
Columbia Records - One of the oldest and most respected record labels in the world, Columbia Records traces its origins back to the late 1880s.
Sony Classical produces unconventional recordings of new classical music,while maintaining the rich traditions of an unparalleled, century-old catalogue of core classical recordings as well as film soundtracks and Broadway musicals.
Sony Nashville is home to the country music division of Columbia Records, the newly merged Epic-Monument Records, and the rootsy imprint Lucky Dog Records.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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