FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Columbia Law School
Columbia Law School

Established 1858
Type: Private
Postgraduates: 1,300
Location: New York, New York, USA
Dean: David Schizer
Website: www.law.columbia.edu

Columbia Law School, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States. According to The Princeton Review, 1,229 students, pursuing J.D., LL.M., and J.S.D. degrees, are enrolled at the school.[1] David Schizer is the dean. Columbia University coat of arms This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the state. ... David Schizer (born c1969) was named the fourteenth dean of Columbia Law School at Columbia University in 2004. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Five Boroughs redirects here. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... J.D. redirects here. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... David Schizer (born c1969) was named the fourteenth dean of Columbia Law School at Columbia University in 2004. ...


Columbia is and has historically been well regarded as one of the country's top law schools. For the past decade, Columbia has consistently been ranked among the top five law schools and is currently ranked 5th by U.S. News & World Report. [1]. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Columbia Law School has a large number of distinguished alumni including two Presidents of the United States and six Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. Furthermore, Columbia Law School has graduated a number of prominent figures in the business world, with more current members of the Forbes 400 having attended Columbia than any other law school.[2]. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... The Forbes 400 or 400 Richest Americans (est. ...

Contents

History

The Gothic Revival Columbia Law School building on the Madison Avenue campus (circa 1860)

The teaching of law at Columbia reaches back to the 18th century. Graduates of the university's colonial predecessor, King's College, included such notable early American judicial figures as John Jay, who would later become the first chief justice of the United States Supreme Court. Columbia College appointed its first professor of law, James Kent, in 1793, but the formal instruction of law was suspended for some time during the early decades of the 19th century. Image File history File links Columbia_law_madison. ... Image File history File links Columbia_law_madison. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, and jurist. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... James Kent (1763-1847) James Kent (July 31, 1763–December 12, 1847), American jurist and legal scholar, was born at New York. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


A revival of interest resulted in the formal establishment of the law school in 1858. The first law school building was a Gothic Revival structure located on Columbia's Madison Avenue campus. Thereafter the college became Columbia University and moved north to the neighborhood of Morningside Heights. Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City which carries northbound one-way traffic. ... Morningside Heights is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City and is bound by the Upper West Side, Morningside Park, Harlem, and Riverside Park (some now consider it part of the Upper West Side). ...


In the 1920s and 30s, the law school soon became known for the development of the legal realism movement. Among the major realists affiliated with Columbia Law School were Karl Llewellyn, Felix S. Cohen and William O. Douglas. Legal realism is a family of theories about the nature of law developed in the first half of the 20th century in the United States (American Legal Realism) and Scandinavia (Scandinavian Legal Realism). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Felix Solomon Cohen (1907-1953) was a lawyer and legal scholar who developed an interest and expertise in law concerning natural resources, statehood and economic development for American territories, Indian affairs, and immigration and minority problems. ... William Orville Douglas (October 16, 1898 – January 19, 1980) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice. ...


In September 1988, Columbia Law School founded the first AIDS Law Clinic in the country, taught by Professor Deborah Greenberg and Mark Barnes.[2] Mark Barnes (b. ...


Columbia Law School today

Today, Columbia Law School is well regarded in the areas of business law, (John C. Coffee, Jr., Ronald J. Gilson, Harvey Goldschmid, Jeffrey Gordon, Katharina Pistor), criminal law (Debra Ann Livingston, Harold Edgar, George Fletcher, Jeffrey Fagan, James Liebman, Gerard Lynch), international and comparative law (Michael Doyle, Jose Alvarez, George Bermann, Lori Fisler Damrosch, Louis Henkin, Petros Mavroidis, Katharina Pistor), Legal Philosophy (Joseph Raz, William H. Simon, R. Kent Greenawalt, Charles Sabel), intellectual property (Jane Ginsburg, Michael Heller, Clarisa Long, Eben Moglen, Tim Wu), administrative law (Thomas Merrill, Gillian Metzger, Peter L. Strauss), and legal history (Eben Moglen, John Witt, Vincent Blasi, Robert Ferguson, Ariela Dubler). Commercial law or business law is the body of law which governs business and commerce and is often considered to be a branch of civil law and deals both with issues of private law and public law. ... John C. Coffee is the Adolf A. Berle Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. ... Harvey Goldschmid is currently a law professor at Columbia University. ... Jeffrey D. Gordon is an officer in the United States Navy. ... The term criminal law, sometimes called penal law, refers to any of various bodies of rules in different jurisdictions whose common characteristic is the potential for unique and often severe impositions as punishment for failure to comply. ... Debra Ann Livingston is a professor of law at Columbia Law School and is currently a nominee for a seat on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. ... George Fletcher (circa 1666 - circa March 1708) was the eldest son of Sir George Fletcher, 2nd Baronet by his second wife Mary, daughter of James Johnstone, 1st Earl of Hartfell. ... Gerard E. Lynch (born 1951 in Brooklyn) is a United States District Court Judge in the Southern District of New York. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... José Álvarez: José María Álvarez de Sotomayor (1880–1947), Spanish dramatist and poet José Álvarez de Toledo y Gonzaga, 15th Duke of Medina-Sidonia, patron of Goya José Manuel Álvarez, Argentine politician José Álvarez de Bohórquez, Spanish equestrian Category: ... George Bermann is the Walter Gelhorn Professor of Law and the Director of the European Legal Studies Center at Columbia Law School. ... Louis Henkin is a former president of the American Society of International Law and the chairman of the Center for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University. ... Philosophy of law is a branch of philosophy and jurisprudence which studies basic questions about law and legal systems, such as what is the law?, what are the criteria for legal validity?, what is the relationship between law and morality?, and many other similar questions. ... Joseph Raz (born 1939) is an influential legal, moral and political philosopher. ... Kent Greenawalt is a University Professor at Columbia Law School. ... Charles Frederick Sabel (born December 1, 1947) is an expert in economics and labor organization. ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ... Jane C. Ginsburg (born 1955) is the Morton L. Janklow Professor of Literary and Artistic Property Law at the Columbia Law School. ... Michael Heller is a law professor known for his focus on property and international law. ... Eben Moglen is a professor of law and legal history at Columbia University, and is the founder, Director-Counsel and Chairman of Software Freedom Law Center, whose client list includes numerous pro bono clients, such as the Free Software Foundation. ... Tim Wu is a professor at Columbia law school and a contributor to Slate Magazine. ... Administrative law in the United States often relates to, or arises from, so-called independent agencies- such as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Here is FTCs headquarters in Washington D.C. Administrative law (or regulatory law) is the body of law that arises from the activities of administrative agencies... Thomas Merrill is the Charles Keller Beekman Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. ... Legal history is a term that has at least two meanings. ... Eben Moglen is a professor of law and legal history at Columbia University, and is the founder, Director-Counsel and Chairman of Software Freedom Law Center, whose client list includes numerous pro bono clients, such as the Free Software Foundation. ... Robert Ferguson (c. ...


Widely cited scholars in other specialties include Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw (race and gender), Michael C. Dorf and Henry Monaghan (constitutional law), Marvin Chirelstein (tax law) Thomas Merrill (administrative law, Property Theory), Robert Scott (contract law), and Patricia J. Williams (race and gender). Columbia was also among the first schools to establish both comparative and international law centers, and is also a major center for the study of Chinese, Japanese and Korean law. Kimberle Williams Crenshaw (b. ... Michael C. Dorf is the Michael I. Sovern Professor of Law at Columbia University. ... Tax law is the codified system of laws that describes government levies on economic transactions, commonly called taxes. ... Thomas Merrill is the Charles Keller Beekman Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. ... There are several individuals called Robert Scott, including: Robert Scott, New Zealand radio broadcaster www. ... Patricia J. Williams (b. ...


In 2006, Columbia Law School embarked on an ambitious campaign to increase the number of faculty by fifty percent without increasing the number of students. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Jerome L. Greene Hall, home of the law school and the Arthur W. Diamond Library. September 2004
Jerome L. Greene Hall, home of the law school and the Arthur W. Diamond Library. September 2004

Columbia Law School’s Arthur W. Diamond Library is the second largest law library in the United States, with over 1,000,000 volumes. The Columbia Law Review is the second most cited law journal in the country and is one of the four publishers of the Bluebook. Columbia Law School has also cultivated alliances and dual degree programs with overseas law schools, including University College London (UCL) and London School of Economics (LSE) in London, England and the Institut d'études politiques de Paris (“Sciences Po”) in Paris, France. Furthermore, Columbia Law School runs vigorous clinical programs that contribute to the community, including the nation's first technology-based clinic, called Lawyering in the Digital Age. This clinic is currently engaged in building a community resource to understand the collateral consequences of criminal charges.[3] In April 2006, Columbia announced that it was starting the nation's first clinic in sexuality and gender law.[4] In 2007, Columbia opened a new program in law and technology. Jerome L Greene Hall, October 2004. ... Jerome L Greene Hall, October 2004. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Columbia Law Review is a law review edited and published entirely by students at Columbia Law School. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... The Law Faculty of University College London is one of the foremost law schools in the United Kingdom, it is situated in the Bloomsbury area of central London. ... Mascot: Beaver Affiliations: University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Website: http://www. ... The Paris Institute of Political Studies (French: Institut détudes politiques de Paris), often referred to as Sciences-Po (pronounced see-ahns po), is a Grand Établissement in Paris, France. ... Collateral consequences of criminal charges, known as the Four Cs in legal parlance [1], are the results of arrest, prosecution or conviction that are not part of the sentence imposed. ...


Columbia Law School’s main building, Jerome L. Greene Hall (or simply "the Law School"), was designed by Wallace Harrison and Max Abramovitz, architects of the United Nations Headquarters and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (which for many years served as the site of Columbia Law School's graduation ceremonies). It is located at the intersection of Amsterdam Avenue and W 116th Street. One of the building's defining features is its frontal sculpture, Bellerophon Taming Pegasus, designed by Jacques Lipchitz, widely reviled among Columbia students. In 1996, the Law School was extensively renovated, including the addition of a new entrance façade and lobby, as well as the expansion of existing space to include a café and lounges. Other Columbia Law School buildings include William and June Warren Hall, the Jerome Green Learning Annex (which Jerome Green's representatives politely declined to have renamed after the building of Jerome Green Hall) and William C. Warren Hall (or "Little Warren"). Jerome L. Jerry Greene (died 1999) was a New York lawyer, real estate investor, and philanthropist. ... Wallace K. Harrison is a mid-twentieth-century architect. ... Max Abramovitz (May 23, 1908–September 12, 2004) was a prominent architect of the New York City firm Harrison, Abramovitz, & Abbe. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... Birth of the Muses, bronze, 1944-1950. ...


The student-run organization Unemployment Action Center has a chapter at Columbia Law School. The Unemployment Action Center, sometimes abbreviated as UAC, is a non-profit organization run by students of seven law schools in the New York City area. ...


Notable alumni

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (32nd U.S. President), attended but did not graduate from Columbia Law
See List of Columbia Law School alumni

Image File history File links Fr32. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... This is a list of individuals who have attended Columbia Law School. ...

Columbia Law School in popular culture

  • Marvel Comics character Matthew Murdock, the alter ego of superhero Daredevil, and his roommate and eventual law partner, Franklin "Foggy" Nelson, attended Columbia Law School.
  • On the television show Law & Order, Assistant District Attorney Jamie Ross studied law at Columbia.
  • In Body Heat, Edmund Walker (played by Richard Crenna), the wealthy husband of the film's femme fatale, is a Columbia Law School graduate.
  • In the film Old School, Dean Gordon Pritchard bribes the student body president by guaranteeing her admission to Columbia Law.
  • On the television show How I Met Your Mother, the character Marshall is a Columbia Law student.
  • On The West Wing (S7E1), Toby Ziegler is seen in a three-year flash-forward to be teaching at Columbia.
  • On The West Wing (S5), Angela (the new head of legislative affairs at the White House) meets Leo in regards to the President's high popularity in polls during the time of his daughter's kidnapping. When Leo says that the President's temporary self-removal from office was a constitutional necessity, Angela comments on the negative political ramifications and tells Leo, "If you want a Constitutional debate, call the Dean of Columbia Law."

This article is about the comic book company. ... Alter Ego has multiple meanings: Alter Ego is a game for the Commodore 64 computer. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... Franklin Foggy Nelson is a comic book character in the Marvel Comics universe, part of the supporting cast of Daredevil (Matt Murdock). ... This article is about the original television series. ... A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ... ADA Jamie Ross played by Carey Lowell Jamie Ross was a fictional character on the TV drama Law & Order, portrayed by Carey Lowell from 1996 to 1998. ... Body Heat is a 1981 neo-noir film written and directed by Lawrence Kasdan. ... Richard Donald Crenna (November 30, 1926 - January 17, 2003) was an American actor. ... Old School is a comedy motion picture released by DreamWorks SKG in 2003, about three thirty-somethings who seek to re-live their college days by starting a fraternity, and the tribulations they encounter in doing so. ... How I Met Your Mother (HIMYM) is a CBS sitcom that premiered on September 19, 2005. ... This article is about a TV show. ... This article is about a TV show. ...

References

  1. ^ The Princeton Review
  2. ^ Constance Hays, Students Protest Possible Closign of Legal Clinic, The New York Times, April 16, 1989.

External links

  • Official Website
  • US News & World Report Columbia Law School Profile
Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Columbia College is the main undergraduate college at Columbia University, situated on the universitys main campus of Morningside Heights in the Borough of Manhattan in the City of New York. ... The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (popularly known as SEAS) is a school of Columbia University which awards degrees in engineering, applied physics and applied mathematics. ... The School of General Studies, commonly known as General Studies or simply GS, is Columbia Universitys undergraduate college for non-traditional students. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... The Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University in New York City, also known simply as GSAPP, is one of the leading architecture schools in the United States. ... The Columbia University School of the Arts , also known simply as the School of the Arts or as SoA, is the division of the university that offers Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degrees in Film, Visual Arts, Theatre Arts, and Writing. ... The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Columbia University (also known as GSAS) is the branch of the university that grants academic degrees, including M.A.s and Ph. ... The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (popularly known as SEAS) is a school of Columbia University which awards degrees in engineering, applied physics and applied mathematics. ... The School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) of Columbia University is a public policy school and one of the most prestigious schools of international affairs and/or public affairs in the United States, and internationally. ... The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is the only journalism school in the Ivy League; it awards the Pulitzer Prize and duPont-Columbia Award; co-sponsors the National Magazine Award and publishes the Columbia Journalism Review. ... The Columbia University School of Social Work is a professional program within Columbia University. ... Columbia Business School (part of Columbia University), officially named the Columbia University Graduate School of Business, and also known as CBS, was established in 1916 to provide business training and professional preparation for undergraduate and graduate Columbia University students. ... Columbia University, legally known as Columbia University in the City of New York, and incorporated under the name Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York, is an Ivy League university located in New York City. ... Seal of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons The Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, abbreviated P&S, is a graduate school of Columbia University located on the health sciences campus in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... The Jewish Theological Seminary of America The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, known in the Jewish community simply as JTS, is one of the academic and spiritual centers of Conservative Judaism. ... Teachers College, Columbia University (sometimes referred to simply as Teachers College; also referred to as Teachers College of Columbia University or the Columbia University Graduate School of Education) is a top ranked graduate school of education in the United States. ... The tower at Union Theological Seminary Birds-eye view at Claremont Ave. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Brooklyn Law School Brooklyn Law School (BLS) is a law school located in downtown Brooklyn, New York. ... The Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law is the law school of Yeshiva University, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... The City University of New York School of Law is a law school operated by the City University of New York (CUNY). ... Fordham University School of Law, commonly known as Fordham Law or Fordham Law School, is a part of Fordham University and is one of eight ABA-approved law schools in New York City. ... New York Law School is a private law school in Lower Manhattan in New York City. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... St. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Columbia Law School - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2675 words)
Columbia Law School, located in New York City, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States.
Columbia College appointed its first professor of law, James Kent, in 1793, but the formal instruction of law was suspended for some time before a revival of interest and the formal establishment of the law school in 1858.
Columbia Law School’s main building, Jerome L. Greene Hall, was designed by Wallace Harrison and Max Abramovitz, architects of the United Nations Headquarters and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (which for many years served as the site of Columbia Law School's graduation ceremonies).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m