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Encyclopedia > Columbia Law Review

The Columbia Law Review is a law review edited and published entirely by students at Columbia Law School. It was founded in 1901 by Joseph E. Corrigan and John M. Woolsey, who served as the Review's first editor-in-chief and secretary, and celebrated the publication of its 100th volume in 2000. A law review is a scholarly journal focusing on legal issues, normally published by an organization of students at a law school or through a bar association. ... Columbia Law School, located in New York City, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University and one of the leading law schools in the United States. ...


The publication is one of a handful of student-edited law journals in the nation that publish eight issues per year. The Review is the third most widely distributed and cited law review in the country, after the Harvard Law Review and the Yale Law Journal. The Review receives about 1,500 submissions per year and selects approximately 25 manuscripts for publication. In addition to articles, the Review regularly publishes scholarly essays and student notes. The Harvard Law Review is a journal of legal scholarship published by an independent student group at Harvard Law School. ... The Yale Law Journal, published continuously since 1891, is by far the oldest and most widely known of the eight law reviews published by students at Yale Law School. ...


The Columbia Law Review is one of the four law review organizations that publishes the Bluebook. The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation is a style guide and a widely used legal citation system in the United States. ...


Alumni of the Columbia Law Review include United States Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas, Columbia Law School Professor Herbert Wechsler, and New York Governor George Pataki.


Famous Constitutional and Legal Theory Articles Published in the Columbia Law Review

  • Felix S. Cohen, Transcendental Nonsense and the Functional Approach, 35 Colum. L. Rev. 809 (1935)
  • Lon L. Fuller, Consideration and Form, 41 Colum. L. Rev. 799 (1941)
  • Felix Frankfurter, Some Reflections on the Reading of Statutes, 47 Colum. L. Rev. 527 (1947)
  • Henry M. Hart, The Relations Between State and Federal Law, 54 Colum. L. Rev. 489 (1954)
  • Herbert Wechsler, The Political Safeguards of Federalism, 54 Colum. L. Rev. 543 (1954)

Felix Solomon Cohen (1907-1953) Felix Cohen was a lawyer and legal scholar who developed an interest and expertise in law concerning natural resources, statehood and economic development for American territories, Indian affairs, and immigration and minority problems. ... Lon Louvois Fuller (1902-1978) is a noted legal douche-bag philosopher, who wrote The Morality of Law in 1964, discussing the connection between law and morality. ... Felix Frankfurter (November 15, 1882 – February 22, 1965) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Herbert Wechsler (1909–2000) was a legal scholar and former director of the American Law Institute (ALI). ...

External links

  • The Columbia Law Review
  • Columbia Law School
  • Washington & Lee Citation Ranking of Legal Periodicals

  Results from FactBites:
 
Columbia Law Review - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (250 words)
The Columbia Law Review is a law review edited and published entirely by students at Columbia Law School.
The Review is the third most widely distributed and cited law review in the country, after the Harvard Law Review and the Yale Law Journal.
The Columbia Law Review is one of the four law review organizations that publishes the Bluebook.
Columbia Law School - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2477 words)
Columbia Law School, located in New York City, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States.
The Columbia Law Review is the third most widely distributed and cited law journal in the country and is one of the four publishers of the Bluebook.
Columbia Law School’s main building, Jerome L. Greene Hall, was designed by Wallace Harrison and Max Abramovitz, architects of the United Nations Headquarters and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (which for many years served as the site of Columbia Law School's graduation ceremonies).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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