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Encyclopedia > Columbia Business School
Columbia Business School
Columbia Business School
Established 1916
School type Private
Dean R. Glenn Hubbard
Location New York, New York, USA
Enrollment 1,196 MBA students
Homepage www.gsb.columbia.edu
Blog www.gsb.columbia.edu/publicoffering

Columbia Business School (also known as CBS) is the business school of Columbia University in New York, New York. It was established in 1916 to provide business training and professional preparation for undergraduate and graduate Columbia University students. Its admission process is among the most selective of top business schools[1] and it is one of six Ivy League business schools. Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... R. Glenn Hubbard is an American economist and professor at Columbia University since 1988. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... A business school is a university-level institution that confers degrees in Business Administration. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Of the eight Ivy League universities in the United States, six have business schools. ...


Columbia Business School is known for its close ties to Wall Street and the seminal work completed in the field of Finance by professors Benjamin Graham and David Dodd. It is affiliated with 12 winners of the Nobel Prize in Economics including current professor Joseph Stiglitz.[2] The School has an international emphasis, and many alumni have achieved distinction in the public as well as the private sector. Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... The cover of Benjamin Graham (May 8, 1894 – September 21, 1976) was an influential economist and professional investor who is today often called the Father of Modern Security Analysis from frequent references made to him by billionaire investor Warren Buffett, who studied under Graham at Columbia University, and was his... David LeFevre Dodd (1895 - 1988) was an American economist, financial analyst, collegiate educator, author, and close colleague of Benjamin Graham (1894 - 1976) at Columbia University. ... The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, commonly called the Nobel Prize in Economics, is a prize awarded each year for outstanding intellectual contributions in the field of economics. ... Joseph Stiglitz (born February 9, 1943) is an American economist, author and winner of Nobel Prize for economics ( 2001). ...


The acceptance rate into Columbia's MBA program was 16% in 2007, the second lowest for all MBA programs (according to US News and World Report in its annual ranking statistics). Columbia's average GMAT score of 709 and total full-time enrollment of 1,196 are third highest among U.S. business schools.[citation needed] Thirty-three percent of the class entering in 2007 are women and 23% are members of a minority group.[3] Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Graduate Management Admission Test, perhaps better known by its initialism GMAT, is a standardized test for determing aptitude in business management studies. ...

Contents

History[4]

Alonzo Barton Hepburn, then president of Chase Manhattan Bank, founded the School in 1916 with 11 full-time faculty members and an opening class of 61 students, including 8 women. The School expanded rapidly, enrolling 420 students by 1920 and in 1924, added a PhD program to the existing BS and MS degree programs. Alonzo Barton Hepburn (July 24, 1846-1922) was born in Colton, St. ... The Chase Manhattan Bank, now part of JPMorgan Chase, was formed by the merger of the Chase National Bank and the Bank of the Manhattan Company in 1955. ...


In 1945, Columbia Business School authorized the awarding of the Master of Business Administration degree (MBA). Shortly thereafter, the School adopted the Hermes emblem as its symbol, reflecting the entrepreneurial nature of the Greek god Hermes and his association with business, commerce and communication. MBA redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ...


In 1952, CBS admitted its last class of undergraduates. The school currently offers executive education programs that culminate in a Certificate in Business Excellence (CIBE) and full alumni status, and several degree programs for the MBA and PhD degrees. In addition to the full-time MBA, the school offers three Executive MBA programs: the NY-EMBA Friday/Saturday program, the EMBA-Global program (launched in 2001 in conjunction with the London Business School), and the Berkeley-Columbia Executive MBA program (launched in 2002 in conjunction with the Haas School of Business at University of California, Berkeley). Students in the latter two programs earn two MBA degrees, one from each of the cooperating institutions. Website http://www. ... Eastern entrance The Walter A. Haas School of Business, better known as the Haas School of Business or simply Haas, is one of 14 schools and colleges at the University of California, Berkeley. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


On July 1, 2004, R. Glenn Hubbard became Columbia Business School's eleventh dean. Hubbard, the former chair of President Bush's Council of Economic Advisers, has worked at the intersection of the private, government and nonprofit sectors and has been actively engaged in national and international economic policy issues. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... R. Glenn Hubbard is an American economist and professor at Columbia University since 1988. ... The Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) is a group of economists set up to advise the President of the United States. ...


Facilities

Uris Hall, standing behind Clement Meadmore's 1968 sculpture "The Curl"
Uris Hall, standing behind Clement Meadmore's 1968 sculpture "The Curl"

Today, Columbia Business School is primarily housed in Uris Hall, a renovated 1960s structure at the center of Columbia's Morningside Heights campus. An auxiliary space, Warren Hall, is situated on Amsterdam Avenue and is shared with the law school. In 2006, rumors that the business school would be moved to a new, more spacious facility at Columbia's planned new campus on 125th Street in Manhattanville were confirmed.[5] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 407 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (543 × 800 pixel, file size: 186 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Uris Hall, Columbia Business School, Columbia University. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 407 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (543 × 800 pixel, file size: 186 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Uris Hall, Columbia Business School, Columbia University. ... Curl, 1968. ... Morningside Heights is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City and is bound by the Upper West Side, Morningside Park, Harlem, and Riverside Park (some now consider it part of the Upper West Side). ... Tenth Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City. ... Columbia Law School, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States. ... 125th Street is a two-way east-west street in Manhattan, considered the Main street of Harlem. ... 125th Street station at Broadway and 125th Street, one of Manhattanvilles primary landmarks Manhattanville is the part of Manhattan in New York City bordered on the south by Morningside Heights on the west by the Hudson river, on the east by Harlem and on the north by Hamilton Heights...


MBA Program

The Columbia MBA Program is designed to prepare its students for the challenges they will face as emerging leaders in a rapidly changing business world. The admission process is highly competitive with an admission rate of 16% in 2007. [6] The student body is highly accomplished and diverse. Students in the class that entered in 2007 come from more than 50 countries and speak more than 40 languages.[7] Thirty-three percent of the class are women and 23% are members of a minority group.[8] The most represented undergraduate universities in the MBA student body are the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell University, Columbia University, Harvard University, Yale University, Duke University, Princeton University, Georgetown University, Dartmouth College, University of Virginia, Brown University, Stanford University, and UC Berkeley.[citation needed] This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Yale redirects here. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Georgetown University is a Jesuit private university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. Bishop John Carroll founded the school in 1789, though its roots extend back to 1634. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


The revised core curriculum, launching in the fall of 2008, represents about 40% of the degree requirement.[9] It consists of 2 full courses and 12 half-term courses including Corporate Finance, Financial Accounting, Managerial Statistics, Managerial Economics, Leadership, Operations Management, and Marketing Strategy.[10] While the first year of the program is usually devoted to completing the requirements of the core curriculum, the second year provides students with the opportunity to choose from the more than 130 elective courses available at the School and supplement them with more than 4,000 graduate-level classes from the University's other graduate and professional schools.[11] Among the most popular electives at Columbia Business School are the Economics of Strategic Behavior, Financial Statement Analysis and Earnings Quality, Launching New Ventures, Modern Political Economy, and the Seminar in Value Investing.[12]


The recently launched Columbia CaseWorks program utilizes the faculty’s research and industry experience and brings that perspective into the classroom through the development of new cases and teaching materials.[13] Beginning in orientation and continuing through core classes and electives, students are immersed in cases that use faculty research to address real-world business issues. Columbia CaseWorks challenges students to debate corporate decision making and to develop appropriate recommendations and solutions.


Graduating students are rewarded with generous salaries. In 2007, the median starting base salary was $100,000 with a median $30,000 signing bonus and a median $30,000 of other guaranteed compensation.[14]


Areas of Focus

Many students choose to focus on a particular area in order to gain deeper knowledge in a specific discipline. Columbia Business School offers the following areas of focus:[15]

  • Accounting
  • Decision, Risk and Operations
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Finance and Economics
  • Healthcare and Pharmaceutical Management
  • Human Resource Management
  • International Business
  • Management / Leadership
  • Marketing
  • Media
  • Private Equity
  • Real Estate
  • Social Enterprise
  • Value Investing

Value Investing Program

As part of its MBA curriculum, Columbia Business School offers the Value Investing Program at the prestigious Heilbrunn Center for Graham & Dodd Investing, for a handful of selected business school students.[16] The program includes Applied Value Investing and Special Situations Investing. Adjunct professors include hedge fund managers, such as Joel Greenblatt,[17] Paul Sonkin[18] and William Von Mueffling[19]. The program also features an extensive list of guest speakers which include Seth Klarman, Michael Price, Bill Nygren, Charles Brandes and Chris Browne. Notable graduates of the value investing program include Warren Buffett, Mario Gabelli, Leon Cooperman, Chuck Royce, Paul Sonkin and William von Mueffling. Joel Greenblatt (born 1958 in Great Neck, New York) is a hedge fund manager, value investing guru, and adjunct professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business. ... Michael F. Price (born 1953) is a value investor and fund manager in Far Hills, New Jersey. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Chris Browne (1952— ) is an American comic strip artist and cartoonist. ... Value investing is a style of investment strategy from the so-called Graham & Dodd School. ... Warren Edward Buffett (born August 30, 1930, in Omaha, Nebraska) is an American investor, businessman and philanthropist. ... Mario Gabelli Mario Giuseppe Gabelli (born June 19, 1942) is an American stock investor, investment advisor and financial analyst. ...


Entrepreneurship Program

Columbia Business School's Entrepreneurship Program strives to provide students with the skills required for venturing and providing opportunities form them to start an entrepreneurial career in four career paths: entrepreneurship in new ventures, entrepreneurship in large organizations, private equity financing and social entrepreneurship.[20] Consequently, entrepreneurship among Columbia MBA students is on the rise, with 20 students in the MBA Class of 2007 starting their own businesses directly after graduation.[21]


Executive MBA Program

Columbia Business School's Executive MBA (EMBA) Program is a 20-month graduate program designed specifically for businesspeople that are looking to enhance their education without interrupting their careers.[22] In addition, there is the opportunity to participate in dual-degree programs, such as the Berkeley-Columbia Executive MBA and EMBA-Global, administered in partnership with London Business School. These programs divide class time between Columbia Business School and the partner institutions and award students MBA degrees from both schools. Website http://www. ...


Doctoral Program

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) is offered by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and is administered by the Business School. Admission is highly competitive with 603 applicants in 2007 for positions in an entering class of 18 students (3%).[23] The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Columbia University (also known as GSAS) is the branch of the university that grants academic degrees, including M.A.s and Ph. ...


Throughout the program, students become familiar with research methods and the literature of their major fields through research projects and directed reading.[24] Doctoral candidates begin the program mastering basic research tools by studying subjects such as economics, behavioral science and quantitative methods, in addition to completing course work and examinations in the major field of study. The completion of course work and qualifying examinations normally requires two to three years.


The research phase begins as early as the first year, when students serve as research assistants, and continues throughout their time at the School.[25] Students gradually become more involved in the design and execution of research and, by the end of the second year, have typically produced at least one paper suitable for publication, often as coauthor with a faculty member. The later years of the program are dedicated to original research and the creation of the dissertation.


Recent Columbia PhD placements include the following:[26]

Harvard Business School, officially named the Harvard Business School: George F. Baker Foundation, and also known as HBS, is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Wharton School Wharton School is the business school of University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Website http://www. ... The Kellogg School of Management (The Kellogg School or Kellogg) is the business school of Northwestern University located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... Cornell redirects here. ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... The Leonard N. Stern School of Business is New York Universitys (NYU) business school. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ...

Faculty

Columbia Business School’s eminence is rooted in the strength, leadership and experience of its 116 full-time faculty members[27], including Joseph Stiglitz, the 2001 Nobel laureate in economics; Ray Fisman, the Lambert Family Professor of Social Enterprise; and Bernd Schmitt, the Robert D. Calkins Professor of International Business. The current Dean is the former Presidential Council of Economic Advisors Chairman Glenn Hubbard. Hedge fund guru Joel Greenblatt is currently an adjunct professor. Bruce Greenwald teaches Value Investing and Economics of Strategic Behavior electives. Adam Dell, brother of Dell Inc. CEO Michael Dell, is a venture capitalist who teaches Business Innovation and Technology. Jonathan Knee teaches Finance and is the author of a book titled "The Accidental Investment Banker". James Freeman teaches Investment Banking and is the CEO of a boutique investment bank by the same name. Joseph Stiglitz (born February 9, 1943) is an American economist, author and winner of Nobel Prize for economics ( 2001). ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Bernd Schmitt is Robert D. Calkins Professor of International Business at Columbia Business School in New York, where he directs the Center on Global Brand Leadership. ... The Council of Economic Advisers is a group of economists set up to advise the President of the United States. ... Glenn Hubbard Glenn Hubbard is currently Dean and Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business. ... A hedge fund is a private investment fund charging a performance fee and typically open to only a limited range of qualified investors. ... Joel Greenblatt (born 1958 in Great Neck, New York) is a hedge fund manager, value investing guru, and adjunct professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia on one of the following topics: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... Michael Saul Dell (born February 23, 1965, in Houston, Texas) is the founder and CEO of Dell, Inc. ... James Freeman (b. ...


Academic Divisions

The School's faculty are divided into five academic units:[28]

  • Accounting
  • Decision, Risk & Operations
  • Finance & Economics
  • Management
  • Marketing

Research centers

Research centers at Columbia Business School include:[29]

The Columbia Institute for Tele-Information (CITI) is one of several research centers for Columbia Business School, focusing on strategy, management, and policy issues in telecommunications, computing, and electronic mass media. ...

Full-Time MBA Ranking

Columbia has consistently been ranked among the top business schools in the world by BusinessWeek, US News & World Report, the Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Forbes. Columbia Business School is one of only two U.S. business schools currently ranked in the top ten of each of these five major publications. BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ...


The full-time MBA program has received these rankings recently: MBA redirects here. ...

  • #1 Financial Times, 2007 Ranking of rankings, US Ranking [30]
  • #2 Financial Times, 2007 [31]
  • #2 Financial Times, 2007 Ranking of rankings, Global ranking [30]
  • The Wall Street Journal[32][33]
    • #3 in US National Ranking, 2007
    • #6 in International Ranking, 2007
    • #1 for Women, 2006
    • #4 for Minorities, 2006
    • #3 for Finance, 2006
    • #4 for International Business, 2006
  • #3 Princeton Review Selectivity rating, 2007[34]
  • #4 Forbes, 2005[35]
  • #5 Princeton Review 2007 Best Career Prospects [36]
  • #5 Aspen Institute U.S. Rankings[37]
  • #6 Aspen Institute Global Rankings[38]
  • #6 Forbes, 2007[39]
  • #9 U.S. News & World Report, 2008 [40]
  • #10 BusinessWeek, 2006 [41]

Executive MBA Ranking

  • #4 Financial Times, 2007 Executive MBA Rankings, Global-EMBA program[42]
  • #6 BusinessWeek Executive MBA Rankings, NY-EMBA program[43]
  • #9 (#2 US Program) Financial Times, 2007 Executive MBA Rankings, NY-EMBA program[42]

Prominent alumni

Warren Edward Buffett (born August 30, 1930, in Omaha, Nebraska) is an American investor, businessman and philanthropist. ... Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRKA, NYSE: BRKB) is a conglomerate holding company headquartered in Omaha, Nebraska, U.S., that oversees and manages a number of subsidiary companies. ... César Alierta Izuel (born May 5, 1945 in Zaragoza, Spain). ... Telefónica, S.A., (IBEX-35:TEF, Euronext: TEF, NYSE: TEF, LSE: TDE, FWB: TEF, TYO: 9481) is a Spanish telecommunications company. ... Louis Moore Bacon (born 1956) is a Hedge fund manager and commodities trader who uses a global macro strategy to invest in the markets. ... There are multiple men named Robert Bennett or Bob Bennett, among them: Robert Bennett, mayor of Melbourne (1861-1862) Robert Earl Bennett, 1960 and 1964 Olympics bronze medalist in swimming Robert Foster Bennett, Senator from Utah (1993 to date) Robert Frederick Bennett, Governor of Kansas (1975-1979) Robert Howard Bennett... The Liberty Media Corporation (NYSE: L) is an American media conglomerate. ... VW redirects here. ... Erskine Boyce Bowles is an American businessman and political figure from the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The University of North Carolina is a seventeen campus system which includes all sixteen public four-year universities in North Carolina, United States and one public residential high school. ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is one of the largest and the most reputed investment banks headquartered in New York City. ... Arthur Frank Burns (1907–1987) was an Austrian-born economist. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ... Liz Claiborne (born Elisabeth Claiborne Ortenberg March 31, 1929) is a Belgian-born fashion designer. ... Notable people called Howard Clark include: A former primate of the Anglican Church of Canada: Howard Clark A European Tour and Ryder Cup golfer: Howard Clark This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... David LeFevre Dodd (1895 - 1988) was an American economist, financial analyst, collegiate educator, author, and close colleague of Benjamin Graham (1894 - 1976) at Columbia University. ... Value investing is a style of investment strategy from the so-called Graham & Dodd School. ... NCR Corporation (NYSE: NCR) is a technology company specializing in solutions for the retail and financial industries. ... Merrill Lynch & Co. ... Diana Fortuna Columbia Business School Alumni Photo Diana Fortuna (born 1957) is the president of the Citizens Budget Commission. ... The Citizens Budget Commission is a nonpartisan, nonprofit civic organization that attempts to influence constructive change in the finances and services of New York City and New York State government. ... Coach Inc. ... Mario Gabelli Mario Giuseppe Gabelli (born June 19, 1942) is an American stock investor, investment advisor and financial analyst. ... American Express (NYSE: AXP), sometimes known as AmEx or Amex, is a diversified global financial services company, headquartered in New York City. ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is one of the largest and the most reputed investment banks headquartered in New York City. ... Michael Gould is the Chairman and CEO of Bloomingdales, a division of Federated Department Stores. ... Bloomingdales is a chain of upscale American department stores owned by Macys, Inc. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... For other persons named Alexander Haig, see Alexander Haig (disambiguation). ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... CommVault® Systems Incorporated is a United States based company specializing in data and storage management software. ... Matthew Norman Hart (born May 16, 1972, Hamilton, Waikato) is a former New Zealand cricketer who played in 14 Tests and 13 ODIs from 1994 to 2002. ... Entrance of the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California Beverly Hilton Hotel viewed from Wilshire Boulvard Hilton is a brand of the Hilton Hotels Corporation, based in Beverly Hills, California. ... Former managing director of GLG Partners, a UK based Hedge Fund. ... This article is about the university in Coral Gables, Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Henry R. Kravis (born 1944) is an American business financier and investor, notable for co-founding and heading the leading private equity firm, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. ... Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co (commonly referred to as KKR) is a New York City-based private equity firm that focuses primarily on late-stage leveraged buyouts. ... A leveraged buyout (or LBO, or highly-leveraged transaction (HLT), or bootstrap transaction) occurs when a financial sponsor gains control of a majority of a target companys equity through the use of borrowed money or debt. ... Sallie Krawcheck was formerly a highly respected equities analyst for Sanford Bernstein. ... Citi redirects here. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... Wasserstein Perella & Co. ... Eugene M. Lang or Gene Lang (In Hungarian: Láng JenÅ‘) (New York City, 1919–) is a Hungarian-American philanthropist who founded REFAC Technology Development Corporation in 1951. ... Frank Raleigh Lautenberg (born January 23, 1924) is a businessman and Democratic Party politician. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide is an advertising agency that has a worldwide presence. ... Mark Mays is the president and CEO of Clear Channel Communications, Inc. ... Not to be confused with clear channel radio stations, which are AM radio stations with certain technical parameters. ... The Kikkoman Corporation (キッコーマン Kikkōman) is an international company based in Japan. ... Vikram Pandit served as the president and chief operating officer of the Institutional Securities and Investment Banking Group at Morgan Stanley where he was responsible for the overall management of the group and focused on the trading, sales and infrastructure aspects of the business. ... Citi redirects here. ... Warburg Pincus is a private equity firm with offices in the United States, Europe and Asia. ... Ian Plenderleith was a member of the Bank of Englands Monetary Policy Committee from June 1997-May 2002. ... The South African Reserve Bank is the central bank of South Africa. ... Compaq Computer Corporation is an American personal computer company founded in 1982, and now a brand name of Hewlett-Packard. ... Paolo Scaroni is the CEO of Eni, one of the most important integrated oil companies in the world. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Keith S. Sherin (born 1958 or 1959) is currently the chief financial officer and senior vice president of finance for General Electric. ... GE redirects here. ... Jerry Speyer Jerry I. Speyer (born 23 June 1940 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is one of two founding partners of the real estate company Tishman Speyer. ... Tishman Speyer Properties is a leading real estate building and operating company set up in 1978 by two founding partners, Jerry Speyer and Robert Tishman. ... Robert Stevens (d. ... Lockheed/BAE/Northrop F-35 Lockheed Trident missile C-130 Hercules; in production since the 1950s, now as the C-130J Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is an aerospace manufacturer formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ... Patrick T. Stokes is the former president and CEO of Anheuser-Busch, Companies. ... Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ... Sidney Taurel was born February 9, 1949 in Casablanca, Morocco. ... Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) is a global pharmaceutical company and one of the worlds largest corporations. ... EMC Corporation (NYSE: EMC) is an American manufacturer of software and systems for information management and storage. ... General Mills (NYSE: GIS) is a Fortune 500 corporation, mainly concerned with food products, which is headquartered in Golden Valley, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. ... A hedge fund is a private investment fund charging a performance fee and typically open to only a limited range of qualified investors. ... Peter Woo Kwong Ching GBS, JP MBA (born 1946) is Chairman of the Hong Kong Trade Development Council (HKTDC) in 2002, Chairman of Wheelock and Company Limited and The Wharf (Holdings) Limited. ... Eudora Welty (b. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Follies

The Columbia Business School Follies is a student club that works throughout each semester to put together a production in which students write, choreograph, and perform comedy skits. It achieved notoriety in 2006[57][58][59] for Every Breath Bernanke Takes, its video parody of the Police song "Every Breath You Take". It purports to be from Glenn Hubbard, Dean of the Business School, in response to Hubbard's being a runner-up to the Fed Chairmanship assumed by Ben Bernanke. The Follies' other notable video parodies include Damn It Feels Good To Be A Banka, B-School Guy vs. Law School Guy, and Baby Got WACC. Sketch Show redirects here. ... Every Breath You Take is a song written by Sting and originally performed by The Police. ... Tipped by some media outlets to be a candidate for the position of Federal Reserve chairman when Alan Greenspan retires. ... The Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve is the head of the central bank of the United States and one of the more important decision-makers in American economic policies. ... Ben Shalom Bernanke[1] (born December 13, 1953) (pronounced ber-NAN-kee, bər-nan-kē or ), is an American economist and current Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve. ...


See also

The following is a partial list of business schools in the United States. ... Of the eight Ivy League universities in the United States, six have business schools. ... A business school is a university-level institution that confers degrees in Business Administration. ... MBA redirects here. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Top 5 Most Selective Business Schools. About.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  2. ^ Columbia University Nobel Laureates, 1906-2004. Columbia University. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  3. ^ About Columbia Business School: Students and Faculty. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  4. ^ Columbia Business School: A History. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2007-12-30.
  5. ^ Columbia University Announces Business School Plan to Move in First Phase of Proposed Expansion in Manhattanville. Columbia University. Retrieved on 2007-12-30.
  6. ^ About Columbia Business School: Students and Faculty. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  7. ^ Columbia Business School 2007 Employment Report. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  8. ^ About Columbia Business School: Students and Faculty. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  9. ^ Columbia Business School MBA Core Curriculum. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  10. ^ Columbia Business School MBA Program Core Curriculum. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  11. ^ Columbia Business School MBA Program Electives. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  12. ^ Columbia Business School MBA Program Electives. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  13. ^ About CaseWorks. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  14. ^ Columbia Business School 2007 Employment Report. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  15. ^ Columbia Business School MBA Program: Areas of Focus. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  16. ^ Heilbrunn Overview. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  17. ^ Joel Greenblatt – Columbia Business School Faculty Staff Directory. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2007-12-30.
  18. ^ Paul Sonkin – Columbia Business School Faculty Staff Directory. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2007-12-30.
  19. ^ [http://www.gsb.columbia.edu/whoswho/bio.cfm?ID=55968 William Von Mueffling – Columbia Business School Faculty Staff Directory]. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2007-12-30.
  20. ^ Entrepreneurship Career Paths. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  21. ^ Columbia Business School 2007 Employment Report. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  22. ^ Columbia Business School EMBA Overview. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  23. ^ Columbia Business School Doctoral Program Admissions Statistics. Columbia Business School. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
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2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management, also referred as the Johnson School, is located at Cornell University. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Harvard Business School, officially named the Harvard Business School: George F. Baker Foundation, and also known as HBS, is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Wharton School Wharton School is the business school of University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The Yale School of Management (also known as Yale SOM) is the graduate business school of Yale University and is located on Hillhouse Avenue in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Yale SOM offers M.B.A. and Ph. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Columbia College is the main undergraduate college at Columbia University, situated on the universitys main campus of Morningside Heights in the Borough of Manhattan in the City of New York. ... The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (popularly known as SEAS) is a school of Columbia University which awards degrees in engineering, applied physics and applied mathematics. ... The School of General Studies, commonly known as General Studies or simply GS, is Columbia Universitys undergraduate college for non-traditional students. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... The Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University in New York City, also known simply as GSAPP, is one of the leading architecture schools in the United States. ... The Columbia University School of the Arts , also known simply as the School of the Arts or as SoA, is the division of the university that offers Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degrees in Film, Visual Arts, Theatre Arts, and Writing. ... The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Columbia University (also known as GSAS) is the branch of the university that grants academic degrees, including M.A.s and Ph. ... The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (popularly known as SEAS) is a school of Columbia University which awards degrees in engineering, applied physics and applied mathematics. ... The School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) of Columbia University is a public policy school and one of the most prestigious schools of international affairs and/or public affairs in the United States, and internationally. ... The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is the only journalism school in the Ivy League; it awards the Pulitzer Prize and duPont-Columbia Award; co-sponsors the National Magazine Award and publishes the Columbia Journalism Review. ... The Columbia University School of Social Work is a professional program within Columbia University. ... Columbia Law School, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States. ... Columbia University, legally known as Columbia University in the City of New York, and incorporated under the name Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York, is an Ivy League university located in New York City. ... Seal of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons The Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, abbreviated P&S, is a graduate school of Columbia University located on the health sciences campus in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... The Jewish Theological Seminary of America The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, known in the Jewish community simply as JTS, is one of the academic and spiritual centers of Conservative Judaism. ... Teachers College, Columbia University (sometimes referred to simply as Teachers College; also referred to as Teachers College of Columbia University or the Columbia University Graduate School of Education) is a top ranked graduate school of education in the United States. ... The tower at Union Theological Seminary Birds-eye view at Claremont Ave. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Columbia Business School (270 words)
Columbia Business School certainly deserves its reputation as one of the best business schools in the world and by all measures offers an excellent business education.
Columbia's charismatic Dean Meyer Feldberg[?] sells potential students on the 'New York Experience', in effect putting the location ahead of the education.
As compared to other business schools, Columbia offers its students a much richer set of opportunities while in school due to its proximity to the financial and media capital of the world (not to mention fashion, advertising, etc).
Columbia University: Columbia Business School (3013 words)
Columbia's recruiting department went out of its way to bring a variety of strong recruiters to campus, and its counselers were always available for guidance and support.
Columbia is just a short cab or train ride away for most of these professionals, and the school is very aggressive in harnessing their resources.
Evidence of the school's efforts can also be seen in the curriculum integration, improvement in information technology, and the overall attitude of treating students as "consumers." Already, Columbia students have their pick of jobs, particularly in the New York City job market where so many Columbia alumni have found success.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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