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Encyclopedia > Colugo
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Colugos
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Dermoptera
Illiger, 1811
Family: Cynocephalidae
Simpson, 1945
Genus: Cynocephalus
Boddaert, 1768
Species

 Cynocephalus varigatus
 Cynocephalus volans Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Phyla Porifera (sponges) Ctenophora (comb jellies) Cnidaria Placozoa Subregnum Bilateria  Acoelomorpha  Orthonectida  Rhombozoa  Myxozoa  Superphylum Deuterostomia     Chordata (vertebrates, etc. ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascideiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of mammary glands... Johann Karl Wilhelm Illiger (November 19, 1775 - May 1813) was a German entomologist. ... George Gaylord Simpson (June 16, 1902 - October 6, 1984) was an American paleontologist. ... Pieter Boddaert (1730 - 1795 or 1796) was a physician and naturalist. ... In biology, a species is, loosely speaking, a group of related organisms that share a more or less distinctive form and are capable of interbreeding. ...

Colugos are arboreal gliding mammals found in South-east Asia. Formerly known as flying lemurs, there are just two species in a single genus, which makes up the entire family Cynocephalidae and order Dermoptera. Though they are the most capable of all mammal gliders, they can not actually fly, nor are they lemurs (which are primates). This article is about the biological organisms known as trees. ... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of mammary glands... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... In biology, a species is, loosely speaking, a group of related organisms that share a more or less distinctive form and are capable of interbreeding. ... In biology, a genus (plural genera) is a grouping in the classification of living organisms having one or more related and morphologically similar species. ... Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Superfamilies and Families Cheirogaleoidea Cheirogaleidae Lemuroidea Lemuridae Lepilemuridae Indridae Lemurs are part of a class of primates known as prosimians, and make up the infraorder Lemuriformes. ... Families 13, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all lemurs, monkeys, apes, and humans. ...


Colugos are fairly large for a tree-dwelling mammal: at about 35 to 40 cm in length and 1 or 2 kilograms in weight, they are comparable to a medium-sized possum or a very large squirrel. They have moderately long, slender limbs of equal length front and rear, a medium-length tail, and a relatively light build. The head is small, with large, front-focused eyes for excellent binocular vision, and small, rounded ears. The international prototype, made of platinum-iridium, which is kept at the BIPM under conditions specified by the 1st CGPM in 1889. ... A possum is any of about 25 small to medium-sized arboreal marsupials native to Australia. ... Genera Many, see the article Sciuridae. ...


Their most distinctive feature, however, is the membrane of skin that extends between their limbs and gives them the ability to glide long distances between trees. Of all the gliding mammals, the colugos have the most extensive adaptation to flight. Their gliding membrane, or patagium, is as large as is geometrically possible: it runs from the shoulder blades to the fore-paw, from the tip of the rear-most finger to the tip of the toes, and from the hind legs to the tip of the tail; unlike in other known gliding mammals even the spaces between the fingers and toes are webbed to increase the total surface area, as in the wings of Microchiroptera and Megachiroptera. In bats, the skin forming the surface of the wing. ...


They are surprisingly clumsy climbers. Lacking opposable thumbs and not being especially strong, they proceed upwards in a series of slow hops, gripping onto the bark of trees with their small, sharp claws. They are as comfortable hanging underneath a branch as sitting on top of it. In the air, however, they are very capable, and can glide as far as 70 metres from one tree to another with minimal loss of height.


Colugos are shy, nocturnal, and restricted to the tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia. In consequence, remarkably little is known about their habits. They are certainly herbivores, and are thought to eat mostly leaves, shoots, flowers and sap, and probably fruit as well. They have well-developed stomachs capable of extracting nutriment from leaves. A nocturnal animal is one that sleeps during the day and is active at night - the opposite of the human (diurnal) schedule. ... Rainforest on Fatu-Hiva, Marquesas Islands A rainforest is a forested biome with high annual rainfall due to the Intertropical convergence zone. ... In zoology, an herbivore is an animal that is adapted to eat primarily plant matter (rather than meat). ...


There are two species, the Malayan Colugo being the larger and more common of the two.

  • ORDER DERMOPTERA
    • Family Cynocephalidae
      • Malayan Colugo, Cynocephalus varigatus
      • Philippine Colugo, Cynocephalus volans
    • No other families

Both species are threatened by habitat destruction, and the Philippine Colugo is classified as vulnerable. In addition to the ongoing clearing of its rainforest habitat, it is hunted for its meat and fur. It is also hunted by the gravely endangered Philippine Eagle: some studies suggest that colugos account for 90% of the eagle's diet. It is not known how the diurnal eagles catch so many of the nocturnal colugos, which are thought to spend the greater part of the day curled up in tree hollows or hanging inconspicuously underneath a branch. This article is in need of attention. ... Binomial name Pithecophaga jefferyi Ogilvie-Grant, 1896 The Philippine Eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) is one of the most powerful birds in the world. ...


The Mixodectidae appear to be fossil Dermoptera. However although other Paleogene mammals have been interpreted as related to Dermopterans, the evidence for this is uncertain and many of them are no longer interpreted as being gliding mammals.


Although they are placental mammals, colugos are almost marsupial-like in their breeding habits. The young are born after just 60 days of gestation in a tiny and undeveloped form, and spend their first six months or so of life clinging to the mother's belly. To protect them and transport them she curls her tail up to fold the gliding membrane into a warm, secure quasi-pouch. Breeding is fairly slow as the young do not reach full size until they are two or three years old. Orders Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia Xenarthra Dermoptera: Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Placentalia and Eutheria are terms used to describe major groupings within the animal class of Mammalia. ... Orders Superorder Ameridelphia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Superorder Australidelphia Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Marsupials are mammals in which the female typically has a pouch (called the marsupium, from which the name Marsupial derives) in which it rears its young through early infancy. ...


Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have demonstrated that colugos belong to the clade Euarchonta along with the tree shrews (order Scandentia) and the primates. In this taxonomy, the Euarchonta are sister to the Glires (lagomorphs and rodents), and the two groups are combined into the clade Euarchontoglires. Molecular phylogeny is the use of a genes molecular characteristics to classify an organism and to place it on a map of evolutionary relationships known as the phylogenetic tree. ... Greek clados = branch) or phylogenetic systematics is a branch of biology that determines the evolutionary relationships of living things based on derived similarities. ... Orders  Dermoptera  Scandentia  Primates The term Euarchonta first appeared in the general scientific literature in 1999, when molecular evidence suggested that the morphology-based Archonta be trimmed down to exclude Chiroptera. ... Genera Tupaia Anathana Urogale Dendrogale Lyonogale Ptilocercus The tree shrews are small, squirrel-like mammals native to the tropical forests of South-east Asia. ... Genera Tupaia Anathana Urogale Dendrogale Lyonogale Ptilocercus The tree shrews are small, squirrel-like mammals native to the tropical forests of South-east Asia. ... For the ecclesiastical use of this term, see primate (religion) Families 13, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all lemurs, monkeys, and apes, including humans. ... Orders  Dermoptera  Scandentia  Primates The term Euarchonta first appeared in the general scientific literature in 1999, when molecular evidence suggested that the morphology-based Archonta be trimmed down to exclude Chiroptera. ... Orders Rodentia Lagomorpha Glires is a proposed clade consisting of rodents and lagomorphs (rabbits, hares, and pikas). ... Families Leporidae Ochotonidae The Lagomorphs, order Lagomorpha, are an order of mammals of which there are two families, Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ... Families See Classification Section The order Rodentia is the most numerous of all the branches on the mammal family tree. ... Greek clados = branch) or phylogenetic systematics is a branch of biology that determines the evolutionary relationships of living things based on derived similarities. ... Orders Glires Rodentia Lagomorpha Euarchonta Dermoptera Scandentia Primates The Euarchontoglires are a mammalian superorder based on molecular genetic research, combining the Glires clade, which consists of the Rodentia and the Lagomorpha, with that of the Euarchonta, a clade consisting of the Scandentia, the Primates and the Dermoptera. ...

 Euarchontoglires |--Glires | |--rodents (Rodentia) | --rabbits, hares, pikas (Lagomorpha) --Euarchonta |--tree shrews (Scandentia) --N.N. |--flying lemurs (Dermoptera) --primates (Primates) 

However morphological studies suggest that they are related to bats (or at least to Megachiroptera), tree shrews, primates and fossil mammals such as Plesiadapiformes. Some mammalogists include Cynocephalidae as especially associated with the Primates as the Primatomorpha. Orders Glires Rodentia Lagomorpha Euarchonta Dermoptera Scandentia Primates The Euarchontoglires are a mammalian superorder based on molecular genetic research, combining the Glires clade, which consists of the Rodentia and the Lagomorpha, with that of the Euarchonta, a clade consisting of the Scandentia, the Primates and the Dermoptera. ... Orders Rodentia Lagomorpha Glires is a proposed clade consisting of rodents and lagomorphs (rabbits, hares, and pikas). ... Families Many, see text The order Rodentia is the most numerous of all the branches on the mammal family tree. ... Families Leporidae Ochotonidae The Lagomorphs, order Lagomorpha, are an order of mammals of which there are two families, Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ... Orders  Dermoptera  Scandentia  Primates The term Euarchonta first appeared in the general scientific literature in 1999, when molecular evidence suggested that the morphology-based Archonta be trimmed down to exclude Chiroptera. ... Genera Tupaia Anathana Urogale Dendrogale Lyonogale Ptilocercus The tree shrews are small, squirrel-like mammals native to the tropical forests of South-east Asia. ... For the ecclesiastical use of this term, see primate (religion) Families 13, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all lemurs, monkeys, and apes, including humans. ...

 Archonta |--Chiroptera? --node |--Scandentia |--Dermoptera --Primates 

Alternatively, some mammalogists suggest that Dermoptera are related to Chiroptera, which is because of possibly convergent adaptations towards gliding. The Archonta are a group of mammals considered a superorder in some classifications. ... Genera Tupaia Anathana Urogale Dendrogale Lyonogale Ptilocercus The tree shrews are small, squirrel-like mammals native to the tropical forests of South-east Asia. ... For the ecclesiastical use of this term, see primate (religion) Families 13, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all lemurs, monkeys, and apes, including humans. ...

 Archonta |--Volitantia | |--Dermoptera | --Chiroptera --node |--Scandentia --Primates 

The Archonta are a group of mammals considered a superorder in some classifications. ... This article is about mammals. ... Genera Tupaia Anathana Urogale Dendrogale Lyonogale Ptilocercus The tree shrews are small, squirrel-like mammals native to the tropical forests of South-east Asia. ... For the ecclesiastical use of this term, see primate (religion) Families 13, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all lemurs, monkeys, and apes, including humans. ...

External link

  • http://www.colugos.com/
Mammals
Monotremata

Placentalia: Xenarthra | Dermoptera | Desmostylia | Scandentia | Primates | Rodentia | Lagomorpha | Insectivora | Chiroptera | Pholidota | Carnivora | Perissodactyla | Artiodactyla | Cetacea | Afrosoricida | Macroscelidea | Tubulidentata | Hyracoidea | Proboscidea | Sirenia Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of mammary glands... Families Kollikodontidae (extinct) Ornithorhynchidae - Platypus Tachyglossidae - Echidnas Steropodontidae (extinct) Monotremes (< monos, single + trema, hole; refers to the cloaca) are mammals that are best known for laying eggs, instead of giving birth to live young like marsupials (Metatheria) and placental mammals (Eutheria). ... Orders Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia Xenarthra Dermoptera: Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Placentalia and Eutheria are terms used to describe major groupings within the animal class of Mammalia. ... Families Myrmecophagidae Megalonychidae Bradypodidae Dasypodidae The order Xenarthra is a group of placental mammals, extant today only in the Americas. ... Families Desmostylidae Paleoparadoxiidae Genera Ashoroa Behemotops Desmostylus Paleoparadoxia The Desmostylia are an extinct order of marine mammals comprising four genera, known from late Oligocene and Miocene fossil records. ... Genera Tupaia Anathana Urogale Dendrogale Lyonogale Ptilocercus The tree shrews are small, squirrel-like mammals native to the tropical forests of South-east Asia. ... Families 13, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all lemurs, monkeys, apes, and humans. ... Families See Classification Section The order Rodentia is the most numerous of all the branches on the mammal family tree. ... Families Leporidae Ochotonidae The Lagomorphs, order Lagomorpha, are an order of mammals of which there are two families, Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ... Families Erinaceidae Soricidae Talpidae Solenodontidae The biological order Insectivora in the past was used as a scrapbasket for a variety of small to very small, relatively unspecialized, insectivorous mammals. ... Families Antrozoidae Craseonycteridae Emballonuridae Furipteridae Megadermatidae Molossidae Mormoopidae Mystacinidae Myzopodidae Natalidae Noctilionidae Nycteridae Phyllostomidae Pteropodidae Rhinolophidae Rhinopomatidae Thyropteridae Vespertilionidae Bats are flying mammals in the order Chiroptera with forelimbs developed as wings. ... Species Manis gigantea Manis temmincki Manis tricuspis Manis tetradactyla Manis crassicaudata Manis pentadactyla Manis javanica Pangolins are mammals with large scales on their skin which can be found in parts of Africa and Asia. ... Families Canidae Felidae Herpestidae Hyaenidae Mephitidae Mustelidae Nandiniidae Odobenidae Pinnipedia Procyonidae Ursidae Viverridae The diverse order Carnivora includes over 260 placental mammals. ... Families Equidae Tapiridae Rhinocerotidae The odd-toed ungulates or Perissodactyla are large to very large browsing and grazing mammals with relatively simple stomachs and a large middle toe. ... Families Suidae Hippopotamidae Tayassuidae Camelidae Tragulidae Moschidae Cervidae Giraffidae Antilocapridae Bovidae The even-toed ungulates form the mammal order Artiodactyla. ... Suborders Mysticeti Odontoceti (see text) The order Cetacea includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. ... Families  Chrysochloridae  Tenrecidae The order Afrosoricida (also known as Tenrecomorpha) contains two families of small mammals that were once considered part of the order Insectivora. ... Genera  Rhynchocyon  Petrodromus  Macroscelides  Elephantulus The small insectivorous mammals endemic to Africa known as elephant shrews are neither elephants nor shrews and, more formally, are the members of the biological order Macroscelidea. ... Binomial name Orycteropus afer Pallas, 1766 The Aardvark (Orycteropus afer) is a medium-sized mammal native to Africa. ... Genera  Procavia  Heterohyrax  Dendrohyrax A hyrax is any of about 11 species of fairly small, thickset, herbivorous mammals in the order Hyracoidea. ... Groups Jozaria (extinct) Anthracobunidae (extinct) Moeritheriidae (extinct) Euproboscidea Numidotheriidae (extinct) Barytheriidae (extinct) Deinotheriidae (extinct) Elephantiformes Phiomiidae (extinct) Palaeomastodontidae (extinct) Hemimastodontidae (extinct) Mammutidea (extinct) Euelephantoidea Choerolophodontidae (extinct) Amebelodontidae (extinct) Gnathabelodontidae (extinct) Gomphotheriidae (extinct) Elephantidae For the plant genus Proboscidea see, Unicorn plant Proboscidea is an order containing only one family of... Families Dugongidae Trichechidae Hydrochichus (extinct) For information about the Gothic metal band, see Sirenia (band) Sirenia are herbivorous mammals of coastal waters. ...

Marsupialia: Didelphimorphia | Paucituberculata | Microbiotheria | Dasyuromorphia | Peramelemorphia | Notoryctemorphia | Diprotodontia Orders Superorder Ameridelphia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Superorder Australidelphia Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Marsupials are mammals in which the female typically has a pouch (called the marsupium, from which the name Marsupial derives) in which it rears its young through early infancy. ... Genera Several; see text Opposum fur is quite soft, and was once commonly used in coats. ... Genera  Caenolestes  Lestoros  Rhyncholestes The biological order Paucituberculata contains the five surviving species of shrew opossum: small, shrew-like marsupials which are confined to the Andes mountains of South America. ... Binomial name Dromiciops gliroides Thomas, 1894 Synonyms The Monito del Monte (little mountain monkey, Dromiciops gliroides or Dromiciops australis) is a semi-arboreal South American marsupial which is thought to be more closely related to the marsupials of Australasia than to those of the Americas. ... Families Thylacinidae Dasyuridae Myrmecobiidae Most carnivorous marsupials belong to the order Dasyuromorphia, including the quolls, dunnarts, Numbat, Tasmanian Devil, and the recently extinct Thylacine. ... Families: Peroryctidae Peramelidae The order Peramelemorphia includes the bandicoots and bilbies: it equates approximately to the mainstream of marsupial omnivores. ... Species The marsupial moles are rare and poorly understood burrowing mammals of the deserts of western Australia. ... Suborders Vombatiformes Phalangeriformes Macropodiformes Diprotodontia is a large taxon of about 120 marsupial mammals including the kangaroos, wallabies, possums, Koala, wombats, and many others. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Colugo (489 words)
Colugos are fairly large for a tree-dwelling mammal: at about 35 to 40 cm in length and 1 or 2 kilograms in weight, they are comparable to a medium-sized possum or a very large squirrel.
Colugos are shy, nocturnal, and restricted to the tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia.
Although they are placental mamals, colugos are almost marsupial-like in their breeding habits.
memenest » Fantastic Animals, The Colugo (or Flying Lemur) (562 words)
Colugos are the sort of animals that defy taxonomic categorization, confuse one’s sense of aesthetics, and seem to largely fall under the umbrella of “weird.”
I’m sure that the Colugo would in fact be insulted by being called something as mundane as a sugar glider.
Colugos and the (marvelous) Tree Shrews (which shouldn’t be insulted by being called Shrews) both seem to be from a family that is ancestral to the Prosimians.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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