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Encyclopedia > Colorado College

Colorado College

Motto Scientia et Disciplina
Established 1874
Type Private
Endowment US $438,711,000
President Richard F. Celeste
Undergraduates 2,011
Location Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
Campus Urban, 90 Acres
Colors Gold and Black
Nickname Tigers
Website http://www.coloradocollege.edu

The Colorado College is a private four-year, co-educational liberal arts college located in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The school enrolls approximately 2,000 undergraduates each year to its 90 acre (360,000 m²) campus, 70 miles (100 km) south of the capital city Denver, with a view of the Rocky Mountains to the west. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Private schools are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public funds. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Richard Frank Dick Celeste (born November 11, 1937, in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American Democratic politician from Ohio. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Colorado Springs is a middle-sized city, located just east of the geographic center of the state of Colorado in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... A website (alternatively, Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP, a... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... The City of Colorado Springs is the second most populous city in the State of Colorado and the 49th most populous city in the United States. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Colorado City-County Denver (coextensive) Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... The Rocky Mountains, often called the Rockies, are a broad mountain range in western North America. ...


The college, or "CC" as it is familiarly known, is known for its high academic standards and unique "block plan" course schedule. As a small college, most of its sports teams are in the NCAA division III, with the notable exception of nationally competitive division I teams in men's hockey and women's soccer. The current President of the college is Richard Celeste, the former Governor of Ohio, ambassador to India, and former Director of the Peace Corps. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Richard Frank Dick Celeste (born November 11, 1937, in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ...


CC is unique as a prestigious, private liberal arts college in the rocky mountain region of the United States. It is affiliated with the Associated Colleges of the Midwest. The Associated Colleges of the Midwest, ACM, is a consortium of fourteen leading liberal arts colleges located in Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin. ...


Founded in 1874 by U.S. Civil War veteran General William Jackson Palmer — the founder of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad and of Colorado Springs — Colorado College was instituted as a liberal arts college which would foster Christian outreach by its graduates and faculty in the New England tradition. Like many U.S. colleges and universities that have endured from the 19th century it now is secular in outlook, though it retains its liberal arts focus. William Jackson Palmer (1836-1909) civil engineer, soldier, builder of the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad and founder of Colorado Springs, Colorado William Jackson Palmer (September 17, 1836 - March 13, 1909) was a civil engineer, soldier, and industrialist. ... Categories: Rail stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Colorado railroads | New Mexico railroads | Utah railroads ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...

Contents

History of Colorado College

Russell T. Tutt Science Center at Colorado College
Russell T. Tutt Science Center at Colorado College

The college's first building, Cutler Hall, was occupied in 1880; the first bachelor's degrees were conferred in 1882. Phi Beta Kappa was chartered in 1904. Under President William F. Slocum, who served from 1888 to 1917, the campus took the shape it held until the 1950s. During this time, the college significantly expanded and improved the library’s holdings and attracted leading scholars in a number of fields. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x546, 101 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Colorado College ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x546, 101 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Colorado College ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...


Since the mid-1950s, the campus has been virtually rebuilt. New facilities include three large residence halls, Worner Campus Center, Tutt Library, Olin Hall of Science and the Barnes Science Center, Honnen Ice Rink, Boettcher Health Center, Schlessman Pool, Armstrong Hall of Humanities, Palmer Hall, El Pomar Sports Center, and Packard Hall of Music and Art. Bemis, Cossitt, Cutler, Montgomery, and Palmer Halls are some of the remaining turn-of-the-century structures on the National Register of Historic Places, along with the William I. Spencer Center. A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


The face of campus changed again at the beginning of the 21st century with construction of the Western Ridge Housing Complex, which offers apartment-style living for upper-division students and completion of the Russell T. Tutt Science Center. The east campus has been expanded, and is now home to the Greek Quad and several small residence halls known as “theme houses.” A Tropical Upper Tropospheric Trough (TUTT) is a trough situated in upper-level (at about 200 hPa) tropics. ...


Academics

Colorado College follows a "block plan"; students study only one subject for three and a half weeks, which advocates say allows for more lab time, field trips, and other more intensive learning experiences. Blocks are only three weeks long in summer school, during which there are also graduate blocks of differing lengths. In parallel with the students, professors teach only one block at a time. Classes are generally capped at 25 (32 for two professors) to encourage a more personalized academic experience.


The college offers more than 80 majors, minors, and specialized programs including: Southwest studies, women’s studies, Asian studies, biochemistry, environmental science, neuroscience, Latin American studies, Russian and Eurasian studies, and American cultural studies, as well as an across-the-curriculum writing program. With stylus and tablet, an upper-class Pompeiian, Sappho, demonstrates her privilege: literacy Womens studies is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to topics concerning women, feminism, gender, and politics. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... Latin American Studies (sometimes abbreviated LAS) is an academic discipline which studies the history and experience of peoples and cultures in the Americas. ...


In addition to its undergraduate programs, the college offers a Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree. A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ...


Tutt Library has approximately half a million bound volumes.


Considered one of the Nation's top colleges, Colorado College perennially ranks in the top tier of National Colleges in the U.S. News Rankings, most recently ranging from a high of 19th in 1999 to a low of 33rd in 2005, one of its rare appearances outside the top 30 in recent years. In a January 2004 ranking of all colleges and universities by Kiplingers magazine, it placed 31st. And in the 2006 U.S. News rankings it was 27th among National Colleges, and soared to 13th place in Best Values among all National Colleges.


CC routinely attracts some of the brightest stars in the arena of government service. Its graduates include Lynne Cheney, wife of U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, and their two daughters, as well as United States Senator Ken Salazar, and Representative Diana DeGette. Lynne Ann Vincent Cheney (born August 14, 1941) , is a novelist, conservative scholar, and former talk-show host who is the wife of Vice President Richard B. Cheney. ... Kenneth Lee Salazar (born March 2, 1955) is an American politician, rancher, and environmentalist from the U.S. state of Colorado. ... Diana DeGette, at podium, denounces a proposed amendment to the Constitution to ban gay marriage. ...


Other well known government figures such as former CIA Director James Woolsey and White House Chief Economic Advisor Martin Neil Baily have seen their children graduate from CC in recent years. The school is widely regarded to have a distinguished faculty, noted for outstanding teaching and a closeness to students in an environment where no class exceeds 25, and a dinner or end-of-block breakfast at a professor's home is a common gathering. Robert James Woolsey, Jr. ... Currently an economist at the International Institute of Economics, Martin Neil Baily is most known for work on productivity and competitiveness and for his tenure as a cabinet member[1][2] during the Clinton Administration. ...


While the focus at Colorado College is primarily on teaching, and its academics involve a high level of rigor and intensity on the block plan, a significant number of faculty are widely published and renowned in their fields. Professor Dennis Showalter, the 2005 recipient of the Samuel Eliot Morison Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Military History, is a leading expert on World War II, a Distinguished Visiting Professor at West Point and the Air Force Academy, Reviewer for the History Book Club, and author of Tannenberg: Clash of Empires, the 1992 winner of the prestigious Paul Birdsall Prize of the American Historical Association. In 2005, he published the first single volume dual military biography of Patton and Rommel, Men of War.


The areas of music and the arts have equally luminous representatives, most notably artist-in-residence Susan Grace, internationally known pianist with appearances at Carnegie Hall.


Both knowledge and art suffuse the work of Colorado College graduates who have such diverse accomplishments as the 2000 Nobel Prize for Economics, won by James Heckman, class of '65, and the rendering of Sacagawea on the U.S. golden dollar coin, by internationally known sculptor, Glenna Goodacre, class of '61. James Heckman (born April 19, 1944) is an economist at the University of Chicago. ... Glenna Goodacre is an artist best known for having designed the Sacagawea Dollar that entered circulation in the United States in 2000. ...


Athletics

The school's sports teams are nicknamed Tigers, though in 1994 a student referendum to change the name to the Cutthroats (Trout) narrowly failed. Colorado College is a member of the NCAA Division III in all sports except men's hockey, in which it participates in the NCAA Division I Western Collegiate Hockey Association, and women's soccer, where it competes as an NCAA Division I team in Conference USA. CC is in the midst of transition from a Division III independent to the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference, which will be completed in the 2007-2008 school year. Image File history File links Wcha-team-logo-colc. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Western Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates over a wide area of the Midwestern and Western United States. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... The Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member institutions are located in Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Texas. ...


The Colorado College men's ice hockey is an unusual powerhouse for such a small school. The Tigers won the NCAA Division I championship twice (1950, 1957), were runners up three times (1952, 1955, 1996) and made the NCAA Tournament eighteen times, including every year since 1995 except 2000, 2004 and 2007.[1]. In 2005, CC played in the Frozen Four. Fifty-five CC Tigers have been named All-Americans[2]. NHL Hall of Fame coach Bob Johnson coached the Tigers from 1963 - 1966[3]. The Frozen Four is the trademarked name of the final two rounds of the NCAA Division I championship of ice hockey in the USA. Schools advance in a single-elimination tournament from four regional sites to a single site, where the national semifinals and final game are played. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Colorado College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (876 words)
The current President of the college is Richard Celeste, most notably the former Governor of Ohio, ambassador to India, and former Director of the Peace Corps.
While the focus at Colorado College is primarily on teaching, and its academics involve a high level of rigor and intensity on the block plan, a significant number of faculty are widely published and renowned in their fields.
Colorado College is a member of the Division III Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference in all sports except men's hockey, in which it participates in the NCAA Division I Western Collegiate Hockey Association, and women's soccer, where it competes as an independent NCAA Division I team.
Colorado Mountain College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (332 words)
Colorado Mountain College (CMC)is a network of seven community college campuses in western Colorado.
Three of the campuses are residential campuses with student residence halls and cafeterias, and are located in Steamboat Springs, Leadville and Glenwood Springs.
Some instructors are also students, as the college allows instructors to take a tuition free course for every course they teach (in addition to salary and benefits).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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