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Encyclopedia > Colorado Buffaloes
Colorado Buffaloes
Colorado Buffaloes athletic logo
University University of Colorado at Boulder
Conference Big 12
NCAA Division I
Athletics director Mike Bohn
Location Boulder, CO
Varsity Teams 16
Stadium Folsom Field
Arena Coors Events Center
Mascot Ralphie (live); Chip (costume)
Nickname Buffaloes
Fight Song Fight CU
Colors Silver and Gold

              Image File history File links University-of-Colorado-Boulder-sports-logo. ... The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[2]; Colorado, CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado system. ... Categories: College athletics conferences ... Pearl Street Mall in Downtown Boulder Boulder (40n01, 105w16 MST) is a city located in Boulder County, Colorado, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 94,673. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Folsom Field is a stadium in Boulder, Colorado. ... Coors Events Center is a 11,064-seat multi-purpose arena in Boulder, Colorado. ... Ralphie IV on the sidelines at the 2005 Big 12 Conference football championship game Ralphie the buffalo is the name of the live mascot of the University of Colorado Buffaloes. ... Silver is the metallic shade of the color gray closest to that of polished silver. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ...

Homepage CUBuffs.com
Mike Bohn at the 2005 Spring Practice game.
Mike Bohn at the 2005 Spring Practice game.

The University of Colorado at Boulder features 16 varsity sports teams. Both men's and women's team are called the Buffaloes (Buffs for short) or Golden Buffaloes (acceptable, but rare).[1] "Lady Buffs" referred to the womens teams beginning in the 1970s, but was officially dropped in 1993.[1] The nickname was selected by the campus newspaper in a contest with a US$5 prize in 1934 won by Andrew Dickson of Boulder, Colorado. They participate in the NCAA's Division I (I-A in football), in the North Division of the Big 12 Conference. The University's current athletic director is Mike Bohn (since April 13, 2005). Colorado has won 22 National Championships in its history, with most in skiing. It was ranked #14 of "America's Best Sports College" in a 2002 analysis performed by Sports Illustrated.[2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[2]; Colorado, CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado system. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The City of Boulder (, Mountain Time Zone) is a home rule municipality located in Boulder County, Colorado, United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...

Contents

History

Football was introduced to the Boulder campus in 1890. Early games, which bore more resemblance to rugby than modern American football, were played against the School of Mines and Utah. The football stadium, originally named Colorado Stadium, was officially named Folsom Field in November 1944 to honor Coach Fred Folsom, one of the most respected college football coaches of his day. Seating capacity in the stadium is currently 53,750 spectators. A BCRFC match at Boston College Rugby football, often just referred to as rugby, refers to sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School in England. ... The Colorado School of Mines is a public research university devoted to engineering and applied science located in the town of Golden, Colorado. ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU) is a public university in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Folsom Field is a stadium in Boulder, Colorado. ...


In 1934 the University teams were officially nicknamed the Buffaloes. Previous nicknames used by the press included the “Silver Helmets” and “Frontiersmen.” The final game of 1934, against the University of Denver, saw also the first running of a buffalo in a Colorado football game. A buffalo calf was rented from a local ranch and ran along the sidelines. The University of Denver (DU) is an independent, coeducational, four-year university in Denver, Colorado. ...


The year 1947 marked key point in race relations on campus. In this year, the Buffaloes joined the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association, commonly know as the Big Six, then to be known as the Big Seven, and later the Big Eight. However, Missouri and Oklahoma had rules which would have allowed them to challenge teams with “colored” players. A student outcry, led by campus paper Silver and Gold, led to a movement against these Jim Crow restrictions which expanded to all the campuses of the Big 7 and eventually lead to their repeal. The Big Eight Conference, a former NCAA-affiliated Division I-A college athletic association that sponsored American football, was formed in January 1907 as the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MVIAA) by its charter member schools: the University of Kansas, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska, and Washington University in... The University of Missouri System is the designated public research and land-grant university system of the state of Missouri. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma founded in 1890. ...


National Championships

The University of Colorado Buffaloes have won 22 team national championships. The following is a list of the teams and years won.

NCAA men and womens team skiing champions 1954 Denver 1955 Denver 1956 Denver 1957 Denver 1958 Dartmouth 1959 Colorado 1960 Colorado 1961 Denver 1962 Denver 1963 Denver 1964 Denver 1965 Denver 1966 Denver 1967 Denver 1968 Wyoming 1969 Denver 1970 Denver 1971 Denver 1972 Colorado 1973 Colorado 1974 Colorado... NCAA Team Champions for Mens Cross Country Division One 1938 Indiana 1939 Michigan St. ... NCAA team Champions for Womens Cross Country Division One 1981 Virginia 1982 Virginia 1983 Oregon 1984 Wisconsin 1985 Wisconsin 1986 Texas 1987 Oregon 1988 Kentucky 1989 Villanova 1990 Villanova 1991 Villanova 1992 Villanova 1993 Villanova 1994 Villanova 1995 Providence 1996 Stanford 1997 Brigham Young 1998 Villanova 1999 Brigham Young... The Bear Bryant Trophy, the AP national championship trophy Division I-A football is the only NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion. ...

Conference Championships

The University of Colorado Buffaloes have won 23 team conference championships since the formation of the Big 12 Conference. The following is a list of the teams and years won.

  • Men's Cross Country (11): 1996-2006
  • Women's Cross Country (10): 1996-1997, 1999-2006
  • Football (1): 2001
  • Soccer (1): 2003

Varsity sports

The University of Colorado was a member of the Colorado Football Association in 1893. Next, they became a charter member of the Colorado Faculty Athletic Conference in 1909 which changed its name a year later to Rocky Mountain Faculty Athletic Conference (RMFAC). Colorado then left the RMFAC to become a charter member of the Skyline Conference (aka Mountain States Conference) in 1938. They then joined the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association, commonly know as the Big Six, in 1947 changing the common name to the Big Seven. In 1958 it became the Big Eight Conference. It remained the Big 8 until 1996 when four more universities were added to the conference and created the new Big 12 Conference. Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... // Formed on May 7, 1910 when the Colorado Faculty Athletic Conference changed its name to the Rocky Mountain Faculty Athletic Conference (RMFAC). ... The Skyline Conference, also known as the Mountain States Conference, was a college athletic conference based in the western United States. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Big Eight Conference, a former NCAA-affiliated Division I-A college athletic association that sponsored American football, was formed in January 1907 as the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MVIAA) by its charter member schools: the University of Kansas, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska, and Washington University in... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... The Big Eight Conference, a former NCAA-affiliated Division I-A college athletic association that sponsored American football, was formed in January 1907 as the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MVIAA) by its charter member schools: the University of Kansas, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska, and Washington University in... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ...


List of Varsity Sports at University of Colorado

Men's sports

  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Ralphie Runners
  • Skiing
  • Track and field (Indoor)
  • Track and field (Outdoor)

Women's sports College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. // The game of basketball was invented by Dr. James Naismith in 1891. ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. ...

  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Golf
  • Skiing
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track and field (Indoor)
  • Track and field (Outdoor)
  • Volleyball

College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. // The game of basketball was invented by Dr. James Naismith in 1891. ... An NCAA tournament game between Indiana University and the University of Tulsa in 2004 College soccer is a term used to describe soccer that is played by teams operated by colleges and universities as opposed to a professional league operated for exclusively financial purposes. ...

Football

Undoubtedly the most famous aspect of Buffaloes athletics is the college football program, 16th on the all-time win list and 22nd in all-time winning percentage (.614). Folsom Field was built in 1924, and since then they have been 280-132-10 at home. The Nebraska game in 2006 was the schools 1100th football game. University of Colorado logo. ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. ... Folsom Field is a stadium in Boulder, Colorado. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Beginning in 1884, Colorado has enjoyed much success through its history. The team has won numerous bowl games (27 appearances in bowl games (12-15), 23rd (tied) all-time prior to 2004 season), 8 Colorado Football Association Championships (1894-1897, 1901-1908), 1 Colorado Faculty Athletic Conference (1909), 7 RFMAC Championships (1911, 1913, 1923, 1924, 1934, 1935, 1937), 4 Mountain States Conference Championships (1939, 1942-1944), 5 Big Eight (Six) conference championships (1961, 1976, 1989, 1990, 1991), 1 Big 12 conference championship (2001), 4 Big 12 North Championships (2001, 2002, 2004, 2005), and an Associated Press National Championship in 1990. 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A bowl game is a post-season college football game, typically at the Division I-A level. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... {{year nav|1939 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: College athletics conferences ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ...

Colorado football also has one Heisman Trophy winner: John Cappellettis 1973 Heisman Trophy is part of an exhibit at the Penn State All-Sports Museum located at Beaver Stadium, on the campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ...

There have also been 6 unanimous All-Americans: Rashaan Iman Salaam (born October 8, 1974 in La Jolla, California) is a former professional American football player. ... The term All-American has two uses: It can be used as a reference to an athlete selected as a member of an All_America team, as in Eddie George was named an All-American football player by both wire services in 1995. ...

There are 4 players in the College Football Hall of Fame: Eric Bieniemy (born August 15, 1969 in New Orleans, Louisiana) was a running back in the National Football League. ... Alfred Williams (born November 6, 1968 in Houston, Texas) is a former American football player. ... Daniel Graham (born November 16, 1978 in Torrance, California) is an American football tight end who plays for the New England Patriots of the NFL. // Growing up in Torrance, CA, Daniel attended Redondo High School in nearby Redondo Beach. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ...

Bill McCartney is the most famous head coach leading Colorado to their only National Championship Title in 1990. The current coach is Dan Hawkins beginning in 2006. Byron Raymond White (June 8, 1916 – April 15, 2002) won fame both as a football running back and as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Richard Paul Anderson (born February 10, 1946) is a former American Football defensive back for the American Football Leagues and NFLs Miami Dolphins, where he played for his entire ten year career from 1968 to 1977 missing two of those seasons with a major knee injury. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... William Paul McCartney (born August 22, 1940 in Riverview,Michigan) is the founder and former president of the controversial international men’s ministry known as the Promise Keepers and was the voice of the radio program 4th and Goal from 2000–2002. ... Dan Hawkins (born November 10, 1960 in Fall River Mills, CA) is the head football coach at the University of Colorado Buffaloes. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Men's basketball

1906 Colorado Buffaloes basketball team.
1906 Colorado Buffaloes basketball team.

They play at the Coors Events Center on campus and are 267-119 (.692) (Prior to 2005 season) at home. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Coors Events Center is a 11,064-seat multi-purpose arena in Boulder, Colorado. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Data through 2006-07 season
Coach Years Seasons Won Lost Pct. Conference Titles NCAA¹ NIT¹
No coach 1902-06 5 18 15 .545
Frank R. Castleman 1907-12 6 32 22 .592
John McFadden 1913-14 2 12 7 .583
James N. Ashmore 1915-17 3 16 10 .615
Melbourne C. Evans 1918 1 9 2 .818
Joe Mills 1919-24 6 30 24 .556
Howard Beresford 1925-33 9 76 51 .598
Henry P. Iba 1934 1 9 8 .529
Earl Clark 1935 1 3 9 .250
Forrest B. Cox 1936-50 13 147 89 .623 0 3 2
H.B. Lee 1951-56 6 63 74 .459 2 2 0
Russell "Sox" Walseth 1957-76 20 261 245 .516 3 3 0
Bill Blair 1977-81 5 67 69 .493 0 0 0
Tom Apke 1982-86 5 59 81 .421 0 0 0
Tom Miller 1986-90 4 35 79 .307 0 0 0
Joe Harrington 1990-96 6 67 76 .469 0 0 2
Ricardo Patton 1996-97 11 184 160 .535 0 2 3
Jeff Bzdelik 2007-
Totals 105 1092 1054 .509

¹ Invitations Ricardo Maurice Patton (born October 23, 1958) is the current head mens basketball coach at the University of Colorado. ... Jeff Bzdelik (April 25, 1959 – ) is a former NBA coach, who coached the Denver Nuggets for slightly over two seasons, from 2002 through 2004. ...


Women's Basketball

Women's Basketball started at Colorado in 1975. The team has had six coaches and the current coach is Kathy McConnell-Miller. 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ...

Data through 2005-06 season and taken from
2005 Big 12 Women's Basketball Media Guide
Year Coach Big 12 Pct. Overall Pct. Postseason
1975-1976 Carol Hochsprung 2-10 (IC) .083 2-11 .154
1976-1977 Jerry Zancanelli 5-8 (IC) .385 8-12 .400
1977-1978 Jerry Zancanelli 5-8 (IC) .385 14-12 .538
1978-1979 Jerry Zancanelli 6-6 (IC) .500 18-14 .563
1979-1980 Rene Portland 10-3 (3/IC) .769 22-9 .710
1980-1981 Rene Portland 9-1 (1/IC) .900 18-11 .621
1981-1982 Russell "Sox" Walseth 10-0 (1/IC) 1.000 28-5 .848
1982-1983 Russell "Sox" Walseth 8-2 (T1/IC) .800 28-8 .778
1983-1984 Russell "Sox" Walseth 7-5 (BE) .583 21-8 .724
1984-1985 Ceal Barry 3-11 (7/BE) .214 10-18 .357
1985-1986 Ceal Barry 2-12 (8/BE) .143 6-22 .214
1986-1987 Ceal Barry 9-5 (2/BE) .643 21-9 .700
1987-1988 Ceal Barry 6-8 (6/BE) .429 14-14 .500
1988-1989 Ceal Barry 8-6 (3/BE) .571 21-11 .656 NCAA
1989-1990 Ceal Barry 14-0 (1/BE) 1.000 27-4 .871 NCAA
1990-1991 Ceal Barry 10-4 (3/BE) .714 17-11 .607
1991-1992 Ceal Barry 8-6 (T4/BE) .571 18-11 .631
1992-1993 Ceal Barry 11-3 (2/BE) .786 22-9 .710 NCAA
1993-1994 Ceal Barry 12-2 (1/BE) .857 27-4 .871 NCAA Regional
1994-1995 Ceal Barry 12-2 (1/BE) .857 27-5 .844 NCAA Regional
1995-1996 Ceal Barry 14-0 (1/BE) 1.000 30-3 .909 NCAA Regional
1996-1997 Ceal Barry 9-5 (4/BE) .643 26-9 .743 NCAA
1997-1998 Ceal Barry 12-4 (T2) .750 23-9 .719 NCAA Regional
1998-1999 Ceal Barry 5-11 (8th) .313 12-16 .429
1999-2000 Ceal Barry 7-9 (T8th) .438 15-14 .517 WNIT
2000-2001 Ceal Barry 4-12 (10th) .250 10-19 .345
2001-2002 Ceal Barry 11-5 (4th) .688 22-9 .710 NCAA
2002-2003 Ceal Barry 11-5 (T3rd) .688 24-10 .706 NCAA Regional
2003-2004 Ceal Barry 11-5 (4th) .688 24-8 .750 NCAA Regional
2004-2005 Ceal Barry 11-5 (3rd) .688 22-8 .733 NCAA
2005-2006 Ceal Barry 2-14 (T11th) .125 9-19 .321
2006-2007 Kathy McConnell-Miller
OVERALL 264-135 .662 586-333 .638
Big Eight Conference 190-69 .734
Big 12 Conference 74-70 .514

1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... For the song by the Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ... For the song by the Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Rene Portland is currently the womens basketball coach at Penn State. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ...

Skiing

The Ski team competes as a member of the Rocky Mountain Intercollegiate Ski Association as the Big 12 does not sponsor skiing. Colorado is one of the dominant programs in the NCAA in skiing winning 16 National Championships, most recently in 2006, and is always nationally ranked and the only Big 12 school to win. Having the Rocky Mountains in your backyard doesn't seem to hurt, along with the world-class ski resorts. Of the Big 12 schools, the university of Colorado is the only school with such an accommodation. The club associated with the sport is the largest of any club affiliated with the school, which aids the recruitment process dramatically. NCAA men and womens team skiing champions 1954 Denver 1955 Denver 1956 Denver 1957 Denver 1958 Dartmouth 1959 Colorado 1960 Colorado 1961 Denver 1962 Denver 1963 Denver 1964 Denver 1965 Denver 1966 Denver 1967 Denver 1968 Wyoming 1969 Denver 1970 Denver 1971 Denver 1972 Colorado 1973 Colorado 1974 Colorado... Confectionary Company, see Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory. ...


Cross Country

Being at such a high altitude helps the runners in training. Colorado has won three NCAA Men's Cross Country Championships (2001, 2004, and 2006) and two NCAA Women's Cross Country Championships (2000 and 2004). The men have also won all 11 Big 12 Conference Titles in the Conference's history. The women have won 10 of the 11 Conference Championships (all but 1998-1999). NCAA Team Champions for Mens Cross Country Division One 1938 Indiana 1939 Michigan St. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... NCAA team Champions for Womens Cross Country Division One 1981 Virginia 1982 Virginia 1983 Oregon 1984 Wisconsin 1985 Wisconsin 1986 Texas 1987 Oregon 1988 Kentucky 1989 Villanova 1990 Villanova 1991 Villanova 1992 Villanova 1993 Villanova 1994 Villanova 1995 Providence 1996 Stanford 1997 Brigham Young 1998 Villanova 1999 Brigham Young... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


Facilities

CU Athletic Facilities
Facility Name Teams Capacity Largest Crowd Opened
Folsom Field football 53,750 54,972 1924
Coors Events Center basketball, volleyball 11,064 11,363 1979
Prentup Field soccer 800 1,871 2004
Potts Field track and field 1984
Balch Fieldhouse indoor track 4,000 1937
South Campus Tennis Complex tennis 2003
Buffalo Ranch CC Course cross country

Folsom Field is a stadium in Boulder, Colorado. ... Coors Events Center is a 11,064-seat multi-purpose arena in Boulder, Colorado. ...

Club Sports

Colorado has a very active and developed club sports system with over 30 sports. Many sports used to be varsity sports but were disbanded in 1980 due to Title IX and some that overlap with varsity sports. 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (United States), commonly known as Title IX, is a 37-word law enacted on June 23, 1972 that states: No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or...

A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a recreation, a sport and a means of transport across land. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Diving refers to the sport of acrobatically jumping or falling into water. ... A young rider at a horse show in Australia. ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world; it is the second most popular team sport after football (soccer)[]. Its official name and the one by which it is usually known is hockey [1][2... Fly rod and reel with a wild brown trout from a chalk stream. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... A kayak is a small human-powered boat. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Racquetball racquet and ball Racquetball is a sport played with racquets and a hollow rubber ball on an indoor or outdoor court. ... A BCRFC match at Boston College Rugby football, often just referred to as rugby, refers to sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School in England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Snowboarder in a half-pipe Snowboarder trail entry Snowboarding is a sport that involves descending a snow-covered slope on a snowboard that is attached to ones feet using a boot/binding interface. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Softball is an activity descended from baseball, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... Taekwondo (also spelled tae kwon do or taekwon-do) is a martial art originating in Korea. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Triathlon is an athletic event consisting of swimming, cycling and running over various distances. ... Ultimate is a competitive non-contact team sport played with a flying disc. ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ... Water polo is a team water sport, which can be best described as a combination of swimming, football, basketball, rugby and wrestling. ... Ancient Greek wrestlers (Pankratiasts) Wrestling is the act of physical engagement between two competitors competing for a physical advantage. ...

Notable Buffaloes

Byron Raymond White (June 8, 1916 – April 15, 2002) won fame both as a football running back and as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... In order to become a Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States, an individual must be nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the U.S. Senate, with at least half of that body approving in the affirmative. ... Chauncey Ray Billups (born September 25, 1976 in Denver, Colorado) is an American professional basketball player. ... Point Guard (PG), also known as the ball-handler, is one of the five traditional positions of a basketball team. ... The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in the Detroit metropolitan area. ... The National Basketball Association Finals Most Valuable Player Award is presented to the National Basketball Association (NBA) player in the NBA Finals that is seen as contributing the most to his team in the series. ... The Pistons are congratulated by President George W. Bush after capturing the 2004 title. ... Jeremy Ryan Bloom (born April 2, 1982 in Fort Collins, Colorado) is an American Olympic skier, male fashion model, VJ, and an American football player for the Philadelphia Eagles. ... Neve and Gliz, the 2006 Olympics mascots, on display in Turin The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Rivalries

University of Nebraska

A traditional college football rivalry with the University of Nebraska Cornhuskers started in the mid 1980s when Bill McCartney declared the conference opponent to be their rival. His theory was since Nebraska was such a powerhouse team, if Colorado was able to beat them then they would be a good team. Colorado began to seriously threaten Nebraska in the late 1980's, and then surpassed the Huskers for the Big 8 crown in 1989. In 1990, Colorado beat Nebraska in Nebraska. In 2001, Colorado entered the Nebraska record books. In that year, Nebraska came to Folsom Field undefeated and left at the short end of a nationally televised 62-36 pasting - the worst loss (at that time) in Nebraksa history. Other sports have then taken on Nebraska also as their rival. The University of Nebraska–Lincoln is a state-supported institution of higher learning located in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. Often referred to as simply Nebraska or UNL, it is the flagship and largest campus of the University of Nebraska system. ... The Nebraska Cornhuskers (often abbreviated to Huskers) is the name given to several sports teams of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. ...


Colorado State University

Colorado's in-state rival is Colorado State University. The two schools are separated by about 50 miles and both schools consider it important and noteworthy to beat the other school for bragging rights for the next year. The two football teams annually compete for the Centennial Cup. The trophy takes its name from the state's nickname of "The Centennial State". Colorado State University is a public land grant institution of higher learning located in Fort Collins, Colorado in the United States. ...


University of Colorado Athletic Hall-of-Fame

Criteria for automatic selection: Three-time all-conference selection, two-time All-American, trophy winner and/or previously retired jersey.

Class of 1998
Byron White (football, basketball, baseball, track, 1935-38)[4]
Class of 1999
Gil Cruter (track, 1934-37)[4]
Burdette "Burdie" Haldorson (basketball, 1952-55)[4]
William "Kayo" Lam (football, 1933-35)[4]
Joe Romig (football, 1959-61)[4]
Lisa Van Goor (basketball, 1981-85)[4]
Class of 2000
David Bolen (track, 1946-48)[4]
Jimmie Heuga (skiing, 1961-63)[4]
Dean Lahr (wrestling, 1962-64)[4]
Pat Patten (wrestling, cross country, track, 1940-47)[4]
Class of 2002
Dick Anderson (football, 1965-67)[4]
Harry Carlson (baseball coach, athletic director, 1927-65)[4]
Darian Hagan (football, 1988-91) [4]
Carroll Hardy (baseball, football, track, 1951-54)[4]
Hale Irwin (golf, football, 1964-67)[4]
Russell "Sox" Walseth (men’s and women’s basketball coach, 1956-76 and 1980-83)[4]
Class of 2004
Don Branby (football, basketball, baseball, 1949-52)[4]
Eddie Crowder (football coach, athletic director 1963-84)[4]
Cliff Meely (basketball, 1968-71)[4]
Frank Potts (track coach, 1927-68)[4]
Shelley Sheetz (basketball, 1991-95)[4]
Bill Toomey (track, 1959-61)[4]
John Wooten (football, 1956-58)[4]
Class of 2006
1959 NCAA Champion Ski Team[4]
Bobby Anderson (football)[4]
Fred Casotti (sports information director, historian)[4]
Adam Goucher (cross country, track, 1994-97)[4]
Bill Marolt (skiing champion, skiing coach, athletic director)[4]
Bill McCartney (football coach, 1982-94)[4]

1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... Byron Raymond White (June 8, 1916 – April 15, 2002) won fame both as a football running back and as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Jimmy Heuga is an American alpine skier and advocate for the neurological disease multiple sclerosis. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Richard Paul Anderson (born February 10, 1946) is a former American Football defensive back for the American Football Leagues and NFLs Miami Dolphins, where he played for his entire ten year career from 1968 to 1977 missing two of those seasons with a major knee injury. ... Darian Hagan, born February 1, 1970, is a former American football and Canadian football player, who from February 2005 forward has been an assistant coach of the University of Colorado Buffaloes football team. ... Carroll William Hardy (born May 18, 1933 in Sturgis, South Dakota) is a former backup outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Cleveland Indians (1958-1960[start]), Boston Red Sox (1960[end]-1962), Houston Colt . ... Hale Irwin (born June 3, 1945 in Joplin, Missouri) is an American golfer. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Eddie Crowder as coach of the Colorado Buffaloes. ... William Anthony Toomey (born January 10, 1939) was the 1968 Olympic Decathlon Champion (United States). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... Image:Adam Goucher. ... William Paul McCartney (born August 22, 1940 in Riverview,Michigan) is the founder and former president of the controversial international men’s ministry known as the Promise Keepers and was the voice of the radio program 4th and Goal from 2000–2002. ...

Traditions

Link to audio versions of songs The University has had several fight songs that have lost and gained popularity over the years. The oldest, "Glory Colorado", is sung to the tune of "Battle Hymn of the Republic" and has been around nearly as long as the school. Glory Colorado is considered to represent all campuses of the University. "Go Colorado" was originally sung exclusively by the Glee Club at football games, though it is now played and known almost exclusively by members of the Golden Buffalo Marching Band. The most popular of the three fight songs and the most widely recognized is "Fight CU." Originally sung by the football team, the song has gained enough popularity that few people outside the band know that it is not the only fight song of the university. The original version included the line "fight, fight for every yard" but the line was changed to "fight, fight for victory" to allow the song to be used for all sports, not just football.


Glory Colorado

Glory, Glory Colorado
Glory, Glory Colorado
Glory, Glory Colorado
Hooray for the silver and gold!


Go Colorado

Away we go, go buffaloes
We want a Colorado victory.
Show them we're out to win this game
Come on Colorado, push on to fame!
Fight for the silver, fight for the gold,
Give a rousing cheer!
Hey Buffaloes, we're going to show
Go Colorado, Let's go!


Fight CU

Fight CU down the field,
CU must win
Fight, fight for victory
CU knows no defeat
We'll roll up a mighty score
Never give in
Shoulder to shoulder
We will fight, fight
Fight, fight, fight!


Alma Mater

Hail, all hail our alma mater
Ever will our hearts be true
You will live with us forever
Loyal will we be to you
We sing forever your praises
Evermore our love renew
Pledge our whole devotion to you
Dear old CU.


Mascot

Main article: Ralphie

The Mascot present at all football games is the Ralphie, a live buffalo, and Chip, a costumed mascot who was selected to the 2003 Capital One All-America Mascot Team. Ralphie is actually Ralphie IV and leads the football onto the field at the beginning of the first and second halves. The tradition begin in 1934 after the selection of Buffaloes as a nickname when a group of student paid $25 to rent a buffalo calf and cowboy as his keeper for the last game of the season. The calf was the son of Killer, a famed bison at Trails End Ranch in Fort Collins, CO. It took the cowboy and four students to keep the calf under control on the sidelines, a 7-0 win at the University of Denver on Thanksgiving Day. Ralphie IV on the sidelines at the 2005 Big 12 Conference football championship game Ralphie the buffalo is the name of the live mascot of the University of Colorado Buffaloes. ... Ralphie IV on the sidelines at the 2005 Big 12 Conference football championship game Ralphie the buffalo is the name of the live mascot of the University of Colorado Buffaloes. ... Binomial name Bison bison (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Horsetooth Rock, atop Horsetooth Mountain, is often used as a symbol of Fort Collins. ...


Colors

The official school colors are silver and gold, adopted in 1888 as a symbol of the mineral wealth of the state. In 1959 the athletic teams started using black and yellow instead of silver and gold because silver and gold ended up looking like dirty white and dirty yellow. The colors have stuck and most people don't even know the school colors are silver and gold. On May 28, 1981, black was replaced by "Air Force Blue" by a Board of Regents mandate.[5][1] However, this color was different than the blue uniforms of the United States Air Force Academy. The blue was changed in 1984 to a darker shade. Black and white photographs of games make the players appear as if they aren't wearing numbers at all. The following season, black was given as an option to teams to replace the blue. On the football uniforms, the blue remained as a stripe on the arm for three more seasons before being dropped completely in 1988. Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA), located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States, (), is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers for the United States Air Force. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Shoulder to Shoulder Gold Rush T-shirt Campaign

This campaign is a student initiative aimed at uniting the CU Community around a positive tradition of wearing the gold Shoulder to Shoulder T-shirt at every home game. This program is student run, organized and managed, so all profits go back to student organizations throughout campus. This also means that the t-shirt can be sold for a very low price, just above the cost to the university. This is $5 for a short sleeve shirt and $7 for a long sleeve shirt. The campaign began in the Fall of 2004 with one student organization and now has expanded to a multi-organization effort.


External links

References

  • Davis, William E. "Bud" (1965). Glory Colorado! A history of the University of Colorado, 1858-1963. Boulder, CO: Prutt Press, Inc.. LD1178 .D35. 
  1. ^ America's Best Sports Colleges Sports Illustrated. October 7, 2002.
  2. ^ The NCAA does not conduct a championship for Division I-A football. Instead, teams are awarded championships by various private organizations, currently the recognized championships are awarded by the Associated Press poll and the Bowl Championship Series --however not always in unison.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac David Plati (2006-09-14). CU Athletic Hall Of Fame To Induct Five, 1959 NCAA Ski Champions (English) (HTML). CUBuffs.com. Retrieved on January 9, 2007.
  4. ^ Colorado (HTML). Helmet Hut. Retrieved on December 31, 2006.

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