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Encyclopedia > Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
View of Duke of Gloucester Street
View of Duke of Gloucester Street

Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. Colonial Williamsburg consists of many of the buildings that formed the original colonial capital of Williamsburg in James City County from 1699 to 1780. ImageMetadata File history File links Colonial_Williamsburg_Duke_of_Gloucester_Street. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Colonial_Williamsburg_Duke_of_Gloucester_Street. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another local government entity. ... Nickname: The Burg Motto: Official website: http://www. ... In general, the word colonial means of or relating to a colony. In United States history, the term Colonial is used to refer to the period before US independence. ... James City County is a county located on the Virginia Peninsula in the state of Virginia. ...


Early in the 20th century, the restoration of Colonial Williamsburg, one of the largest historic restorations ever undertaken, was championed by the Reverend Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin and John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who wanted to celebrate the patriots and the early history of the United States of America. Reverend Dr. W. A. R. Goodwin (1869-1939), was the rector of Bruton Parish Church who began the 20th century effort which resulted in the preservation and restoration of Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia . The Reverend Dr. William Archer Rutherfoord Goodwin (1869-1939) (or W.A.R. Goodwin as he preferred... John D. Rockefeller Jr. ...


Some of the structures from the Colonial period have been reconstructed on their original sites. Many other structures have been restored to their original 18th century appearances. Many other historic buildings were demolished to return the district to an approximation of its earlier appearance. Of the approximately 500 buildings in the historic area, 88 are original. Most buildings are open for tourists to look through. Interpreters work, dress, and talk as they did in the era, teaching visitors more about the site. Colonial Williamsburg is owned and operated (as a living museum) by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, and is not directly affiliated with the nearby Colonial National Historical Park. Interpreter can mean one of the following: In communication, an interpreter is a person whose role is to facilitate dialogue between two parties that do not use the same language. ... A living museum is a type of museum that recreates to the fullest extent conditions of a various culture, environment or historical period. ... Colonial National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park located in the southeastern part of Virginia, near Williamsburg and Newport News. ...


A main source of tourism to Williamsburg, Virginia, visitors can witness a treelined 1930s interpretation of a Colonial American city with exhibits including authentic colonial homes, American Revolutionary War history exhibits, and the town jail, which includes an authentic stocks and pillory display. Nickname: The Burg Motto: Official website: http://www. ... This article is actively undergoing a major edit for a short while. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Netherlands, Spain, allies British Empire, allies Commanders George Washington Comte de Rochambeau Nathanael Greene William Howe Henry Clinton Charles Cornwallis Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties {{{casualties1}}} {{{casualties2}}} {{{notes}}} The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was the military component of... Modern Day Stocks Entertainment The stocks are a device used for public humiliation, corporal punishment, and torture. ... It has been suggested that Pranger be merged into this article or section. ...

Contents


History

Jamestown

On May 13, 1607, at a small low-lying wooded peninsula, virtually an island, the Jamestown Settlement was established on the south side of what is now known as the Virginia Peninsula. In 1618 several colonists left and formed the "Martin's Hundred" colony to the south. Of the 220 or so which left, one year later, all were either killed or missing. The first meeting of a representative government group in the American colonies was held at the Jamestown Settlement on July 30, 1619, making Jamestown the first Capital of Virginia. Among the 22 members of the colony was the governor, who was appointed by officials of the Virginia Company in London. The governor in turn appointed six important members of the colony to be his council. The other 15 members were elected by the free men of the Virginia Colony who were over 17 and also owned land. This body, known as the House of Burgesses, later became the Virginia General Assembly. May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... Events January 20 - Tidal wave swept along the Bristol Channel, killing 2000 people. ... Jamestown was a village on an island in the James River in Virginia, about 45 miles southeast of where Richmond, Virginia, is now. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 154 days remaining. ... Events May 13 - Dutch statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt is executed in The Hague after having been accused of treason. ... The 1606 grants by James I to the London and Plymouth companies. ... For other uses, see London (disambiguation). ... Patrick Henry before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. Rothermel The House of Burgesses was the lower house of the Colony of Virginia. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Virginia. ...


See more about Jamestown today in the Historic Triangle section below.


Middle Plantation, College of William and Mary

Middle Plantation was originally established in 1632. It was located on high ground about half-way across the Virginia Peninsula between the James and York Rivers. It was at the edge of a geographic plateau of the Tidewater Region, from which the land slopes eastward down to sea level at the lower end of the peninsula. This was a natural point to build a line of defense for the lower peninsula during early conflicts with the Native Americans. In 1676, after the State House at Jamestown was burned during Bacon's Rebellion, the House of Burgesses met at Middle Plantation, which was nearby. The College of William and Mary was established adjacent to Middle Plantation in 1693. There, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson were among many of Virginia's (and the nation's) future leaders who received their higher education, a tradition which was to continue for hundreds of years. Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ... York River can refer to: The York River in Virginia in the United States. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... An Atsina named Assiniboin Boy Native Americans in the United States (also known as Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are the indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States and their descendants in... Bacons Rebellion, also known as the Virginia Rebellion, was an uprising in 1676 in the Virginia Colony, led by Nathaniel Bacon. ... Patrick Henry before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. Rothermel The House of Burgesses was the lower house of the Colony of Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary in Virginia is the second-oldest institution of higher education in the United States (after Harvard University). ...


Williamsburg becomes Capital

Capitol Building
Capitol Building

The statehouse (capitol building) in Jamestown burned again on October 20, 1698. The following year, in 1699, in a meeting held by the colonists, a group of students from the College of William and Mary submitted a proposal to move the capital to Middle Plantation, to escape the dreaded malaria and mosquitoes that plagued the Jamestown Island site. The capital of the Virginia Colony was relocated to Middle Plantation. ImageMetadata File history File links Colonial_Williamsburg_Capitol. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Colonial_Williamsburg_Capitol. ... October 20 is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 72 days remaining. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... Red blood cell infected with Malaria, derived from mala aria (Italian for bad air) and formerly called ague or marsh fever in English, is an infectious disease which causes about 350-500 million infections with humans and approximately 1. ... This article is about the insect; for the WWII aircraft see De Havilland Mosquito. ...


Soon thereafter, Middle Plantation was renamed Williamsburg by Royal Governor Francis Nicholson, proponent of the change, in honor of King William III of Great Britain. The new site was described by Nicholson as a place where "clear and crystal springs burst from the champagne soil." Portrait thought to be Nicholson Sir Francis Nicholson (1655-1728) was a British military officer and was colonial governor or acting governor of New York, Virginia, Maryland, Nova Scotia, and South Carolina. ... -1...


In 1705, the first Capitol building in America was built at the end of the Duke of Gloucester Street. Williamsburg was to be the capital of Virginia for the remainder of the Colonial Period. It was the center of the political and social life of Virginia for most of the 18th century. Famous members of the House of Burgesses which met in the Capital there included Patrick Henry, George Washington, George Mason, and Thomas Jefferson. A fire destroyed the building in 1747. It was rebuilt, but fell into disrepair after the American Revolution. The building now standing on its site is a recreation of the 1705 building. The new Capitol was dedicated with a ceremonial meeting of the Virginia General Assembly on February 24, 1934. Capitol Building The Capitol at Williamsburg, Virginia was the first Capitol building in America in 1705. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 320 km 690 km 7. ... Patrick Henry before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. Rothermel The House of Burgesses was the lower house of the Colony of Virginia. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War from 1775 to 1783, and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected unanimously twice, and remained in from... George Mason (December 11, 1725 – October 7, 1792) was a United States patriot, statesman, and delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... The American Revolution ended two centuries of British rule for most of the North American colonies and created the modern United States of America. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Virginia. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


As a tradition in Virginia, since 1934, Virginia's state legislators have reassembled for a day every other year in the Capitol building at the east end of Colonial Williamsburg's Historic Area.


Capital moves to Richmond; Williamsburg takes a nap

During the American Revolutionary War, in 1779, the Capital of Virginia was moved to Richmond, about 55 miles (90 km) west for security reasons, and there it was to stay. Nickname: River City Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra Official website: http://www. ...


For many years thereafter, the colonial section of Williamsburg was neglected as the modern town was built around it. By the early 20th century, many of the older structures were in poor condition, and were no longer in use. The site on high ground and away from waterways was also not reached the early railroads. When Collis P. Huntington built the new Chesapeake and Ohio Railway through the area in 1881, his main purpose was the through shipment of coal from West Virginia to Newport News and the new coal pier on the harbor of Hampton Roads. In fact, the entire Industrial Revolution also seemed to only pass by Williamsburg, with barely a flag stop. Aside from The College (technically a university), to some appearances, Williamsburg seemed to have drifted into sleepy retirement. However, the visions of an Episcopalian minister and the interest of a wealthy American family were to combine to make that sleepy era only a nap in the city's history, as the Colonial era was re-awakened with a new mission. Collis Potter Huntington (October 22, 1821 – August 13, 1900) was one of the Big Four of western railroading (along with Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins and Charles Crocker) who built the Southern Pacific Railroad and other major interstate train lines. ... The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) was a Class I railroad formed in 1869 in Virginia from many smaller railroads begun in the 19th century. ... 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Coal is a fossil fuel extracted from the ground by underground mining or open-pit mining (strip mining). ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 41st 62,809 km² 210 km 385 km 0. ... Aerial view looking east of Virginian Railway coal piers at Sewells Point on Hampton Roads near Norfolk, Virginia. ... Hampton Roads, from state map of pre-civil war Virginia circa 1858 Hampton Roads is the name of both a body of water and the land areas which surround it in southeastern Virginia in the United States. ... The Industrial Revolution (more correctly, the First Industrial Revolution) was one of the major technological, socioeconomic and cultural changes in the late 18th and early 19th century resulting from the replacement of an economy based on manual labour to one dominated by industry and machine manufacture. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees at all levels (bachelor, master, and doctor) in a variety of subjects. ...


Recreation and Restoration, Colonial Williamsburg today

Dr. Goodwin and the Rockefellers

The Reverend Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin, became rector of Williamsburg's Bruton Parish Church in 1903. The energetic 34-year old native of Nelson County, Virginia|Nelson County was soon leading a successful campaign to save and restore the historic church building, which had been built beginning in 1711. Dr. Goodwin was also an instructor at the nearby College of William and Mary, home of the historic Wren Building. Reverend Dr. W. A. R. Goodwin (1869-1939), was the rector of Bruton Parish Church who began the 20th century effort which resulted in the preservation and restoration of Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia . The Reverend Dr. William Archer Rutherfoord Goodwin (1869-1939) (or W.A.R. Goodwin as he preferred... Bruton Parish Church is located in the restored area of Colonial Williamsburg in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary in Virginia is the second-oldest institution of higher education in the United States (after Harvard University). ... The Wren Building is a highly notable building on the campus of the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. ...


In 1923, fearing that the many other historic buildings in the area would be destroyed as time went on, he started a movement to preserve the buildings in the historic section of the town. After working for several years to interest potential individuals or organizations to assist with funding, Dr. Goodwin was fortunate in this effort draw the interest (and major financial commitment) of John D. Rockefeller Jr., the wealthy son of the founder of Standard Oil. Rockefeller's wife, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller was also to play an active role. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. ... Standard Oil (1870 - 1911) was a large, integrated ,oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing organization. ... Abby Aldrich Rockefeller was born Abby Greene Aldrich on October 26, 1874 in Providence, Rhode Island. ...


Re-creation and restoration started on November 27, 1926 with the noted designer Arthur Shurcliff as the chief landscape architect. Since then, Colonial Williamsburg has been nearly completely recreated. It features shops, taverns and open-air markets in the colonial style. The Governor's Palace and the Capitol building are among the significant buildings built to conjectural designs during the 1930s. In the western side of the district, near the College of William and Mary, modern shops have been segregated under the name "Merchant's Square". Modern asphalt and brick paving lines the street and sidewalks to make the experience accessible to all. November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Arthur Asahel Shurcliff (1865 - 1957) was a noted American landscape architect. ... A landscape architect is primarily a designer of spaces, mostly landscapes, and sometimes gardens, in the field of landscape architecture. ... The Governors Palace The Governors Palace on Duke of Gloucester Street in Williamsburg, Virginia is one of the two larger buildings at Colonial Williamsburg. ... The College of William and Mary in Virginia is the second-oldest institution of higher education in the United States (after Harvard University). ...

Tourists on horse and wagon tour of CW
Tourists on horse and wagon tour of CW

ImageMetadata File history File links Colonial_Williamsburg_wagon_tour. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Colonial_Williamsburg_wagon_tour. ...

A major 21st century destination

Colonial Williamsburg can be described as a combination of a historical theme park and a living history museum in one large and nicely executed package. Both clean and safe, it has become one of the more popular tourist destinations in the world for families and groups. With its historic significance in democracy, it and the surrounding area have been the site of many summit meetings of world leaders. Theme Park is a simulation computer game designed by Bullfrog Productions, released in 1994, in which the player designs and operates an amusement park. ... See Historical reenactment for the generic use of the term. ...


The Visitor's Center (right off the Colonial Parkway) features a short movie and is an excellent place to start (and leave automobiles, which are restricted from the restored area, where wheelchair-accessible shuttle bus service is provided). Colonial Parkway is a scenic 23-mile parkway linking the 3 popular attractions of Virginias Historic Triangle of colonial-era communities, Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. ... TheBus, established by Mayor Frank Fasi, is Honolulus only public transit system. ...


Grand Illumination

The Grand Illumination is an outdoor ceremony and mass celebration involving the simultaneous activation of thousands of Christmas lights held each year on the first Sunday of December. The current Grand Illumination event, which began in 1935, is derived from a colonial (and English) tradition of placing lighted candles in the windows of homes and public buildings to celebrate a special event. The winning of a war and birthdays of the reigning monarchs (King and/or Queen) were examples of such national events. (The American tradition of fireworks displays for Independence Day and other holidays and events is of a similar nature). Grand Illumination is an outdoor ceremony involving the simultaneous activation of Christmas lights. ... A ceremony is an activity, infused with ritual significance, performed on a certain occasion. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A lit candle. ... Look up monarch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A monarch (see sovereign) is a type of ruler or head of state. ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Sydney Opera House illuminated under New Years Eve Fireworks 2005 A fireworks event (also called a fireworks display or fireworks show) is a spectacular display of the effects produced by firework devices on various occasions. ... An Independence Day is an annual celebration commemorating the anniversary of a nations assumption of independent statehood, usually after ceasing to be a colony or part of another state. ...


Local lingo

When visiting Colonial Williamsburg, it helps to know some of the local lingo. Locals and employees frequently call Colonial Williamsburg "CW." The main portion is often called the "Restored Area" or the "Historic Area." They also advise to avoid "confusion corner," which is the busy intersection of Jamestown Road, Richmond Road, and North and South Boundary Streets (in front of the Wren Building of The College of William and Mary, itself often called simply "The College." The Wren Building is a highly notable building on the campus of the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary in Virginia is the second-oldest institution of higher education in the United States (after Harvard University). ...


Transportation options

Unlike many U.S. destinations, Williamsburg offers good non-automobile driving alternatives for visitors. The area has both a central intermodal transportation center and a public transit bus system. Williamsburg Transportation Center is a combined facility (itself in a restored building) with taxicabs, Amtrak passenger railroad service, and intercity bus service provided by Greyhound Lines (Carolina Trailways) and Hampton Roads Transit (HRT). The transportation center affords access to the CW Visitor's Center and is located near the downtown and restored areas. A Volvo articulated bus in contract service for Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, operated by Virginia Overland Transportation, an urban-suburban bus line, in 2003 A transit bus (also known as a commuter bus) in the United States is usually operated by an urban-suburban bus line, a governmental... A taxicab (sometimes called taxi, cab, or hack) is a vehicle for hire which conveys passengers between locations of their choice. ... Amtrak train in downtown Orlando, Florida Amtrak’s high-speed Acela Express at Penn Station New York, NY Amtrak, is the brand name of the intercity passenger train system created on May 1, 1971 in the United States. ... The Bus, established by Mayor Frank Fasi, is Honolulus only public transit system. ... Greyhound Lines is the largest intercity common carrier of passengers by bus in North America, serving 2200 destinations in the United States. ... Hampton Roads Transit (HRT) formed in 1999 by the merging of Pentran in Hampton and TRT in Norfolk, Virginia. ...


The community's public bus system, Williamsburg Area Transport (WAT), has its central hub at the transportation center. Various color-coded routes, with buses accessible to disabled persons, serve many hotels and motels, restaurants, stores, and non-CW attractions in City of Williamsburg and much of neighboring James City County and part of York County. Nickname: The Burg Motto: Official website: http://www. ... James City County is a county located on the Virginia Peninsula in the state of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Yorktown Area  - Total  - Water 558 km² (216 mi²) 285 km² (110 mi²) 50. ...


Historic Triangle: Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown

The Historic Triangle is located on the Virginia Peninsula and includes the colonial communities of Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown, with many restored attractions linked by the Colonial Parkway. This article reads like an advertisement. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... Jamestown was established in 1607, on the James River in Virginia, about 45 miles (70 kilometers) southeast of where Richmond, Virginia, is now located. ... Nickname: The Burg Motto: Official website: http://www. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... Colonial Parkway is a scenic 23-mile parkway linking the 3 popular attractions of Virginias Historic Triangle of colonial-era communities, Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. ...


Colonial Parkway

The National Park Service's Colonial Parkway joins the three popular attractions of Colonial Virginia with a scenic and bucolic roadway carefully shielded from views of commercial development. This helps visitors mentally return to the past and maintain the ambiance while moving between the major attractions by motor vehicle or bicycle. There are often views of wildlife and waterfowl. Many visitors and local citizenry feel this two lane roadway is the best (but certainly not quickest) way to move between the three points. Near the James River and York River ends of the parkway, there are several pull-offs, where some families allow their children to feed bread to the seagulls. (Warning: No trucks are allowed, animals and birds have right-of-way over vehicles, and the modest speed limits are vigilantly enforced). The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Colonial Parkway is a scenic 23-mile parkway linking the 3 popular attractions of Virginias Historic Triangle of colonial-era communities, Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. ... York River can refer to: The York River in Virginia in the United States. ... Genera Pagophila Larus Rissa Creagus Xema Rhodostethia Gulls are seabirds in the family Laridae and subfamily Lari. ...


For an even better experience, some visitors choose to approach the area from the south by water from Surry County with a ride aboard one of the Jamestown Ferrys, which include the Pocahontas and Williamsburg. As passengers cross, they can walk about the boat or go up to an enclosed viewing level with restrooms. Weather and daylight permitting, passengers usually see the Jamestown Island much as the first colonists may have approached it. In fact, the replicas of Christopher Newport's three tiny ships, Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery are docked near the northern ferry landing. (Both the Jamestown Ferry and Colonial Parkway are toll-free). Surry County is a county located in the south-eastern part of the state of Virginia. ... Jamestown Ferry (also known as the Jamestown-Scotland Ferry) is an automobile ferry on the James River in Virginia, connecting Jamestown in James City County with Scotland in Surry County. ... Christopher Newport (c. ... Susan Constant was the largest of three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... Godspeed was one of the three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... Discovery was a 70-ton fly-boat of the English East India Company, launched before 1602. ...


Jamestown

The first permanent English settlement in the New World which was established at Jamestown in 1607. Today, you can visit the Jamestown Festival Park and Jamestown Island attractions. Included are recreations of a Native American village and colonial fort, and archaeological sites where current work is underway. Jamestown was established in 1607, on the James River in Virginia, about 45 miles (70 kilometers) southeast of where Richmond, Virginia, is now located. ... Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain and her consort Prince Phillip inspect replica of Susan Constant at Jamestown Festival Park in Virginia on October 16, 1957 Jamestown Festival Park was established at Jamestown, Virginia in 1957 to mark the 350th anniversary of the founding of the Jamestown Settlement. ... An Atsina named Assiniboin Boy Native Americans in the United States (also known as Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are the indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States and their descendants in... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ...


Yorktown

Yorktown is where General Cornwallis surrendered to George Washington in 1781, ending the American Revolution. There are two large visitor centers, battlefield drives, and a waterfront area. York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War from 1775 to 1783, and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected unanimously twice, and remained in from... The American Revolution ended two centuries of British rule for most of the North American colonies and created the modern United States of America. ...


Commercial Enterprises

Notwithstanding the successful efforts to provide a non-commercial atmosphere at the three Historic Triangle areas (and on the Colonial Parkway between them), there are many hotels, motels, campgrounds, restaurants, shops and stores, gasoline stations, and amusements close by. Several major attractions are:

Busch Gardens Williamsburg is a European-themed park located in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Theme Park is a simulation computer game designed by Bullfrog Productions, released in 1994, in which the player designs and operates an amusement park. ... Nickname: The Burg Motto: Official website: http://www. ... James City County is a county located on the Virginia Peninsula in the state of Virginia. ... United States Highway 60 is an east-west United States highway, running 2,670 miles (4,300 km) from Virginia to Arizona. ... Williamsburg Pottery Factory The story of the Williamsburg Pottery mirrors the American enterprise system. ... United States Highway 60 is an east-west United States highway, running 2,670 miles (4,300 km) from Virginia to Arizona. ... Nickname: The Burg Motto: Official website: http://www. ... James City County is a county located on the Virginia Peninsula in the state of Virginia. ... Water Country USA is a water theme park in Williamsburg, Virginia, USA. It is the Mid-Atlantics largest water park, and it contains spectacular entertainment, shops and restaurants, water rides, and other attractions (which all have a 1950s or 1960s surf theme). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Virginia State Highway 199, informally known as the Williamsburg Beltway, is located in the eastern part of the US state of Virginia. ... Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Yorktown Area  - Total  - Water 558 km² (216 mi²) 285 km² (110 mi²) 50. ...

See also

  • Carter's Grove
  • Hampton Roads
  • Route 199 (Virginia) (named the Humelsine Parkway after Carlise H. Humelsine, a former curator and president of Colonial Williamsburg)

Carters Grove circa 2000 Carters Grove is currently a 750 acre Virginia plantation on the James River completed in 1755 and named for Carter Burwell. ... Hampton Roads, from state map of pre-civil war Virginia circa 1858 Hampton Roads is the name of both a body of water and the land areas which surround it in southeastern Virginia in the United States. ...

External links

This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica, a publication in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The 11th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Colonial Williamsburg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2176 words)
Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia.
Colonial Williamsburg consists of many of the buildings that formed the original colonial capital of Williamsburg in James City County from 1699 to 1780.
Williamsburg was to be the capital of Virginia for the remainder of the Colonial Period.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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