FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Colonel (United States)

Please see "Colonel" for other countries which use this rank Colonel is a military rank of a commissioned officer, with the corresponding ranks existing in nearly every country in the world. ...

Insignia of a United States Colonel
Insignia of a United States Colonel

Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. Colonel ranks above a Lieutenant Colonel and below a Brigadier General and holds the pay grade of O-6. The insignia for a Colonel is a silver eagle with a U.S. shield superimposed on its chest and holding an olive branch and bundel of arrows in its talons. The eagle lead to the informal term "full bird colonel". The rank is used by the Army, Marines, and the Air Force. The equivalent in the Navy or Coast Guard is Captain. USAF Colonel insignia, public domain image from af. ... USAF Colonel insignia, public domain image from af. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Genera Eagles are large birds of prey, who inhabit mainly the Old World, with only two species (Bald Eagle and Golden Eagle) in North America, a few in South America and three (White-bellied Sea Eagle, Little Eagle and Wedge-tailed Eagle) in Australia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... United States Marine Corps seal The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military, which along with the U.S. Navy, is under the United States Department of the Navy. ... The United States Air Force (or USAF) is the aerospace branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... Coast Guard shield The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a military branch of the United States involved in maritime law, mariner assistance and search and rescue, among other duties of any coast guard. ... Captain is both a nautical term and a rank in various uniformed organizations. ...

Contents


Origins

William Few in the uniform of a Continental Army Colonel
William Few in the uniform of a Continental Army Colonel

The United States rank of Colonel is a direct successor to the same rank in the British Army. The first Colonels in America were appointed from Colonial militias maintained as reserves to the British Army in the American colonies. Upon the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, the rank of Colonel could be appointed by a Colonial legislature, where a person would be given a commission to raise a regiment and serve as its Colonel. Thus, the first American Colonels were usually respected men with ties in local communities and active in politics. Such was the origin of the term "soldier and statesman". Image File history File links Few. ... Image File history File links Few. ... William Few (June 8, 1748—July 16, 1828) was an American politician and a Founding Father of the United States. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Colonel is a rank of the British forces, ranking just below brigadiers. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... In general, the word colonial means of or relating to a colony. In United States history, the term Colonial is used to refer to the period before US independence. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Netherlands, Spain, Native Americans Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, Native Americans Commanders George Washington, Comte de Rochambeau, Nathanael Greene William Howe, Henry Clinton, Charles Cornwallis (more commanders) The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence,[1] was a conflict that... A regiment is a military unit, larger than a company and smaller than a division. ...


The first insignia for the rank of Colonel consisted of gold shoulder boards worn on the blue uniform of the Continental Army. The first recorded use of the eagle insignia was in 1805 as this insignia was made official in uniform regulations by 1810. Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


19th century Colonels

The rank of Colonel was relatively rare in the early 19th century, due in part that the United States Army was very small in size and the rank of Colonel was usually obtained only after long years of service. During the War of 1812, many temporary Colonels were appointed but these commissions were either considered brevet ranks or the commissions were canceled at the war’s conclusion. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants United States United Kingdom Strength United States Regular army : 99,000 Volunteers: 10,000* Rangers: 3,000 Militia: 458,000** Naval and marine: 20,000 Indigenous peoples New York Iroquois: 600 Northwestern allies: ? Southern allies: ? United Kingdom Regular army: 10,000+ Naval and marine: ? Canadian militia: 86,000+** Indigenous... The word brevet has several meanings: In the military, brevet refers to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to temporarily hold a higher rank, without a corresponding pay increase. ...

Shoulder Strap from a Colonel in the Union Army
Shoulder Strap from a Colonel in the Union Army
A Colonel of the Confederate Army wearing the three star insignia
A Colonel of the Confederate Army wearing the three star insignia

The American Civil War saw a large influx of Colonels as the rank was commonly held in both the Confederate Army and Union Army by those who commanded a regiment. Since most regiments were state formations and were quickly raised, the Colonels in command were known by the title “Colonel of Volunteers”, in contrast to Regular Army Colonels who held ranks from the “old school” of the professional army before the Civil War. Image File history File links UCWColonel. ... Image File history File links UCWColonel. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (650x1024, 103 KB) Summary Confederate Colonel John S. Green (Original photograph now available through U.S. National Archives) Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (650x1024, 103 KB) Summary Confederate Colonel John S. Green (Original photograph now available through U.S. National Archives) Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederate) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties Killed in action: 110,000 Total dead: 360,000 Wounded: 275,200 Killed in action: 93,000 Total dead: 258... This article is in need of attention. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... The Regular Army is the name given to the permanent force of the United States Army that is maintained during peacetime. ...


During the Civil War, the Confederate Army maintained a unique insignia for Colonel being that of three stars worn on the collar of a uniform.Robert E. Lee wore this insignia in respect to his former rank in the United States Army. Lee refused to wear the insignia of a Confederate General, stating that he would only accept permanent promotion when the South had achieved independence. For the author of Inherit the Wind and other works, see Robert Edwin Lee. ... Army shoulder insignia for a full General General is the most senior rank currently used in the United States Army, United States Air Force and United States Marine Corps. ...


After the Civil War, the rank of Colonel again became rare as the forces of the United States Army became extremely small in number. Many Brevet Colonels appeared during the Spanish American War, chief among them Theodore Roosevelt. The Spanish-American War took place in 1898, and resulted in the United States of America gaining control over the former colonies of Spain in the Caribbean and Pacific. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ...


20th century Colonels

The First and Second World Wars saw the largest numbers of Colonels ever appointed in the United States armed forces. This was mostly due to the temporary ranks of the National Army and the Army of the United States, where those who would normally hold the rank of Captain in the peacetime Regular Army were thrust into the rank of Colonel during these two wars. Image File history File links Palma. ... Image File history File links Palma. ... Colonel is a military rank of a commissioned officer, with the corresponding ranks existing in nearly every country in the world. ... The United States Air Force (or USAF) is the aerospace branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... The National Army was the combined conscript and volunteer force that was was formed by the United States War Department in 1918 to fight in World War I. The National Army was formed from the old corps of the United States Army, augmented by units of the United States National... The Army of the United States is the official name for the draft force of the United States Army that may be raised at the discretion of the United States Congress in the event of the United States entering into a major armed conflict. ... Captain is both a nautical term and a rank in various uniformed organizations. ...


It was also during the First World War that a tradition developed in that Colonels would wear the eagle insignia with the head pointing outwards from the neck as if to “face the enemy”. This was in contrast to the Army uniform regulations of the time, which stated that the eagle would be worn on the left collar, with the beak of the eagle facing inwards towards the wearer’s neck. Photographic evidence and service records from the Military Personnel Records Center indicate that this tradition lasted into the Second World War, after which time more strict uniform regulations prevented Colonels from reversing the insignia in this fashion. The United States Navy, however, also picked up on this tradition and Midshipman today are taught that during times of war Navy Captains will reverse their collar insignia (which is the same eagle insignia as that of Colonel) in order to have the eagle facing the enemies of the United States. Military Personnel Records Center The Military Personnel Records Center (NPRC-MPR)[1] is a branch of the National Personnel Records Center and is the repository of over fifty-six million military personnel records, health files, and medical records pertaining to retired, discharged, and deceased veterans of the United States armed... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ...


By the end of the Korean War, appointments to the rank of Colonel were standardized to be granted after roughly 16-18 years of service in the military, however temporary Colonel appointments continued well into the Vietnam War. The last temporary appointments to the rank of Colonel occurred in the late 1970s; since then all Colonels have received permanent appointments upon promotion. Combatants Western Allied/UN combatants: South Korea, United States Communist combatants: North Korea, Peoples Republic of China, Soviet Union Commanders Douglas Macarthur Park Chang-Ju Jang Tak-Sang Kim Il Sung Oh Chol-Lyong Mun Dong-Gee Choi Un-Hyeok Strength Note: All figures may vary according to source. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) United States of America South Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand the Philippines Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) National Liberation Front (Viet Cong) Strength ~1,200,000 (1968) ~420,000 (1968) Casualties South Vietnamese dead: 230,000 South Vietnamese wounded: 300,000 US dead...


Modern rank

Modern American colonels usually command infantry brigades, USAF groups or wings, and USMC regiments. An Army colonel typically commands brigade-sized units (3,000 to 5,000 Soldiers), with a Command Sergeant Major as principal Non-Commissioned Officer assistant, and is also found as the chief of divisional-level staff agencies. Brigade is a term from military science which refers to military echelon under a division, above a regiment where that exists as such, nowadays often a group of several battalions (typically two to four), and directly attached supporting units (normally including at least an artillery battery and additional logistic support). ... For some other uses of the word group please see Group Group is a term used by different air forces for a unit of command. ... Wing is a term used by different air forces for a unit of command. ... A regiment is a military unit, larger than a company and smaller than a division. ... Brigade is a term from military science which refers to military echelon under a division, above a regiment where that exists as such, nowadays often a group of several battalions (typically two to four), and directly attached supporting units (normally including at least an artillery battery and additional logistic support). ... This article is about a military rank and position. ... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or noncom, is a non-commissioned member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ...


In the modern United States armed forces, the Colonel's eagle is worn facing inwards with head and beak pointing towards the wearer's neck. Of all US Military officer rank, only the Colonel's eagle has a distinct right and left insignia. All other officer rank insignia can be worn on either the right or left side. The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ...


Famous American Colonels

U.S. commissioned officer ranks
  Student Officer O-1 O-2 O-3 O-4 O-5 O-6 O-7 O-8 O-9 O-10 O-11 (wartime only) Special Grade
United States Navy: MIDN/OC ENS LTJG LT LCDR CDR CAPT RDML RADM VADM ADM FADM Admiral of
the Navy
United States Marine Corps: Midn 2ndLt 1stLt Capt Maj LtCol Col BGen MajGen LtGen Gen (no equivalent) (no equivalent)
United States Army: CDT 2LT 1LT CPT MAJ LTC COL BG MG LTG GEN General of
the Army
General of the Armies
United States Air Force: Cadet 2nd Lt 1st Lt Capt Maj Lt Col Col Brig Gen Maj Gen Lt Gen Gen General of
the Air Force
(no equivalent)
United States Coast Guard: CDT ENS LTJG LT LCDR CDR CAPT RDML RADM VADM ADM (no equivalent) (no equivalent)

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m