FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > College of Charleston

College of Charleston

Image:CoCseal.gif Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Motto "Knowledge itself is liberty."
Type Public university
President Dr. P. George Benson
Staff 836
Undergraduates 9866
Postgraduates 1454
Location Charleston, South Carolina, USA
Colors Maroon and White
Mascot Cougar
Website www.cofc.edu

The College of Charleston (C of C) is a public university located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina. The College was founded in 1770 and chartered in 1785, making it the oldest college or university in South Carolina, the 13th oldest institution of higher learning in the United States, and the oldest municipal college in the country. The founders of the college include three signers of the Declaration of Independence and three signers of the United States Constitution. It is said that the college was founded to, "encourage and institute youth in the several branches of liberal education." The College is in company with the Colonial Colleges as one of the oldest schools in the United States. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: The Palmetto City Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... A mascot, originally a fetish-like term for any person, animal, or thing supposed to bring luck, is now something—typically an animal or human character—used to represent a group with a common public identity, such as a school, professional sports team (the name often corresponds with the mascot... Binomial name Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) Cougar range map Synonyms Felis concolor The cougar (Puma concolor), also known as the puma or mountain lion, is a large, solitary cat found in the Americas. ... Image File history File links Logo_college_of_charleston. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: The Palmetto City Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Battle of Chesma, by Ivan Aivazovsky. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... A municipal college is a city supported institution of higer learning. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of the United States of America Page one of the original copy of the Constitution. ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ...

Contents

History

In addition to its status as the oldest college or university in South Carolina, founded in 1770 and chartered in 1785, the College of Charleston (C of C) is the 13th oldest institution of higher learning in the United States and the first municipal college in the country. The College is in company with the Colonial Colleges as one the original and foundational institutions of higher education in the United States. Its founders include three signers of the United States Declaration of Independence and three signers of the United States Constitution. The College's historic campus, which is listed on the U.S. Department of the Interior's National Register of Historic Places, forms an integral part of Charleston's colonial-era urban center. A municipal college is a city supported institution of higer learning. ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... A copy of the 1823 William J. Stone reproduction of the Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of Great Britain. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of the United States of America Page one of the original copy of the Constitution. ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


The College of Charleston lies in the heart of historic downtown Charleston, roughly in the middle of the Charleston peninsula. Built on land given to the College's founders by Grace Episcopal Church, located to the south of the campus, the College originally held class in one of several buildings that have since been torn down. The oldest building on campus, the Bishop Robert Smith House, built in 1770, serves as the President's House. Randolph Hall was built in 1828 and is the oldest functioning college classroom building in the nation. Currently it houses the President's Office, Graduate Studies offices, and various others. Towell Library, located alongside Randolph Hall in the area known as the Cistern, was built in 1855 and was the College's original library. Porter's Lodge was built in 1850 and originally functioned as the residence for the campus' porter, who was charged with the maintenance and upkeep of the College's facilities until the position was no longer needed soon after the Civil War. The College has twice served as barracks for American soldiers, once during the Civil War and again during World War I. Randolph Hall and Towell Library both exhibit damage from cannonfire from the Civil War. In 1886, Charleston experienced a massive earthquake, estimated to have been a 7.5 on the Richter Scale. The earthquake demolished most of the city, but the structures of the College survived relatively unscathed, though many structures maintain earthquake bolts that were believed to stabilize the buildings. In 1989, Hurricane Hugo took its toll on much of the South Carolina coast, devastating Charleston in particular. While many of the Live Oaks found around campus were damaged and removed during the cleanup, the rest of the campus was spared and few signs of the hurricane still exist. The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επίσκοπος, transliterated epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Robert Nivelle Herbert Henry Asquith Sir Douglas Haig Sir John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow... Lowest pressure 918 mbar (hPa) Damage $10 billion (1989 USD) $13. ... Southern live oaks on Skidaway Island, near Savannah, Georgia Live oak is a general term for a number of unrelated oaks in several different sections of the genus Quercus that happen to share the character of evergreen foliage. ...


The College became the nation's first municipally funded public university in 1826, and was incorporated into the South Carolina State College System in 1970. The College first admitted women in 1918, and African-Americans in 1968.


College of Charleston Today

Although existing as a small liberal arts college for much of its early history, once it became a state supported institution in 1970 the size of C of C's faculty and student body expanded exponentially, transforming it from a small regional college of about 400 students to a national masters level university with a combined graduate/undergraduate enrollment of over 12,000. Despite this growth into a university, the institution still retains its historical name of "College of Charleston" and actively cultivates an identity as a liberal arts institution. The liberal arts heritage is reflected in the core curriculum, which includes a heavy emphasis on languages, literature, history, sciences, and the arts. Under President Higdon, the decision was made to cap undergraduate enrollment at 10,000 students and increase the size of the College's tenure-track faculty. This was done in order to create and maintain an institution which could uniquely offer the best of a small elite liberal arts college, such as small class size and individual attention, with the faculty resources, research and curricular opportunities of a large research institution. A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... A research institute is a establishment endowed for doing research. ...


The College of Charleston today is nationally recognized both for its focus on undergraduate education and faculty research contributions. The College of Charleston is one of the nation's leading institutions for undergraduate education according to the Princeton Review; U.S. News and World Report regularly ranks C of C among the best southern masters level universities. As one of the leading institutions of higher education in the Southeastern United States, the College of Charleston is celebrated nationally for its focus on undergraduate education. According to the Princeton Review, C of C is one of the nation's best institutions for undergraduate education and U.S. News and World Report regularly ranks C of C among the best masters level universities in the South. Regional definitions vary from source to source. ...


The College is nationally known for departmental strengths across its six academic divisions known as 'schools.' These are the School of the Arts, School of Business & Economics, School of Education, School of Humanities & Social Sciences, School of Languages, Cultures, & World Affairs and the School of Science & Mathematics.


The Classics, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Classical Civilization, originally formed the core curriculum at the College of Charleston at its founding in 1770. As the College's 'original' program, today the College's Department of Classics continues that legacy and boasts the one of the nation's best undergraduate programs in Classical Languages and Civilizations. Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ...


According to the 1970 legislative decree that incorporated the College of Charleston in the the South Carolina system, the College was given a mandate to develop the state's flagship programs in those academic areas that capitalize on Charleston's and the Lowcountry's unique natural and cultural strengths: Marine Biology and Fine Arts. Today, the College's Grice Marine Laboratory is one of the Eastern Seaboard's leading research centers in the marine sciences. In addition, Grice supports the College's graduate and undergraduate programs in Marine Biology. Marine biology is the scientific study of the Max, animals and other organisms that live in the ocean or any other body of water. ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... Categories: US geography stubs ... Marine biology is the scientific study of the Max, animals and other organisms that live in the ocean or any other body of water. ...


The College of Charleston hosts South Carolina's flagship programs in the Arts. The College of Charleston's Department of Art History is one of an elite few independent art history departments in North America and is the only department that specializes in undergraduate education of the three independent art history departments in the Southeastern United States. The department supports programs in Art History and Historic Preservation and Community Planning and its faculty contribute to interdisciplinary programs in Archaeology, Asian and Latin American Studies. Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... Historic preservation or Heritage management is the theory and practice of creatively maintaining the historic built environment and controlling the landscape component of which it is an integral part. ... Archaeology, archeology, or archæology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech/discourse) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains and environmental data, including architecture, artifacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Asian people. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ...


With Charleston's wealth of resources in the performing arts to draw on, not least of which is Charleston's Spoleto Festival, the College's Theatre and Music departments form South Carolina's best undergraduate performing arts programs. Cathedral of Santa Maria dellAssunta in Spoleto For the Spoleto Festival USA, see Spoleto Festival USA. The Festival dei Due Mondi (Festival of the Two Worlds) is an annual summer music and opera festival held each June to early July in Spoleto, Italy since its founding by composer Gian... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Allegory of Music on the Opéra Garnier Music is an art form that involves organised sounds and silence. ...


In 1992 the University of Charleston, now called the Graduate School of the College of Charleston, was founded as the graduate program for the College. By 1999, the graduate program had over two thousand students. Today, the Graduate School of the College of Charleston offers sixteen degree and six certificate programs in addition to coordinating support for the College's many nationally recognized faculty research programs. 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


Although the core of the institution is in downtown Charleston, C of C has a satellite campus in nearby North Charleston, used mostly by its graduate and continuing education programs; Grice Marine Laboratory is located at Fort Johnson on neighboring James Island, across from penninsular Charleston on the Ashley River side of Charleston Harbor. Most of the College's athletic teams train and compete at Patriot's Point Athletic Complex in Mount Pleasant, located next to the confluence of the Cooper River and Charleston Harbor.


President

On October 26, 2006, the College of Charleston Board of Trustees announced that Dr. P. George Benson would succeed Conrad Festa, the interim president, as President of the College of Charleston. Dr. Benson will become only the 21st president in the college's over 225 year history. He will officially take over in the Spring of 2007. Prior to becoming President of the College of Charleston, Dr. Benson served as the Dean of the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia.


Athletics

The school's athletic teams, which participate in the NCAA Division I Southern Conference, are known as the Cougars. While the College lacks a football program, the College's student fans are known for their fanatical support. The College's best-known athletic program is men's basketball. The men's basketball team won the NAIA national title in 1983 and made four trips to the NCAA Tournament (1994, 1997, 1998 and 1999) under the leadership of former head coach John Kresse, for whom their arena is named. The College also boasts the 2004, 2005 & 2006 SoCon Champion Baseball team, 2004 SoCon Championship Men's Soccer team, 2003 & 2005 SoCon Championship Softball team, 2001-2004 SoCon Championship Women's Volleyball team, men's and women's swimming, men's and women's cross country, women's track & field,equestrian team, women's basketball team, a coed and women's sailing team, and both men's and women's student rugby clubs. The sailing team competes in the South Atlantic Intercollegiate Sailing Association division and in 2006 the Cougars won the Intercollegiate Sailing Association National Championships, a regatta which they hosted. In 2006 the school's baseball team won the Southern Conference Baseball Tournament and the Lexington NCAA tournament regional, defeating Big East champion Notre Dame and SEC champion Kentucky in the process. Also in 2006, college basketball coaching legend Bobby Cremins returned to the coaching ranks after he accepted a job as the Cougars' head basketball coach just days after Winthrop coach and former C of C assistant Gregg Marshall reneged on an oral acceptance to coach the basketball team. In February 2007, the College broke ground on the Carolina First Center, a state-of-the-art, 5,000 seat basketball arena that will be home to the basketball squad. Image File history File links Logo_college_of_charleston. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Southern Conference (or SoCon) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NCAAs Division I. Its football teams compete in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS), the lower of two levels of Division I football competition (formerly known as Division I-AA). ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. ... NAIA is an acronym (or an initialism) that can refer to the following: National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics in the United States. ... NCAA Mens Basketball Division I Championship - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... John Kresse - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The Southern Conference (or SoCon) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NCAAs Division I. Its football teams compete in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS), the lower of two levels of Division I football competition (formerly known as Division I-AA). ... A young rider at a horse show in Australia. ... For the songs, see Sailing (song). ... The South Atlantic Intercollegiate Sailing Association (SAISA) is a district in the Intercollegiate Sailing Association. ... The ICSA National Championship Regatta is held once each year in May and is hosted by a member school of the Intercollegiate Sailing Association. ... A regatta is a boat race or series of boat races. ... Nickname: Athens of the West Horse Capital of the World Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area    - City 739. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of thirteen universities, mostly in the northeastern United States: Boston College (scheduled to leave in 2005) University of Connecticut (UConn) Georgetown University (Plays Division I-AA football in the Patriot League) University of Notre Dame (Plays Division I-A football... Not to be confused with the University of Notre Dame Australia University of Notre Dame du Lac The University of Notre Dame (standard name; full legal name University of Notre Dame du Lac) is a Roman Catholic institution of higher learning located in Notre Dame, Indiana, USA adjacent to the... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Bobby Cremins (born July 4, 1947) American, is the former head coach of Georgia Techs mens basketball team, serving from 1981 until 2000. ... Winthrop is the name of some places: In the United States of America: Winthrop, Maine Winthrop, Massachusetts Winthrop, Minnesota Winthrop, Arkansas Winthrop, Iowa Winthrop, Washington In Australia: Winthrop, Western Australia Winthrop is also part of the name of: Winthrop University John Winthrop Winthrop Rockefeller Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP This... The College of Charleston Arena is a 5,000 seat multi-purpose arena in Charleston, South Carolina. ...


Campus Development

Under former President Higdon, many new developments are underway for the College of Charleston. Two residence halls are in construction in the area enclosed between George St., St. Philips St. and Liberty St. Libery Street Residence Hall will be geared towards underclassmen and be similar to McAlister Residence Hall. George St. Apartment Community will be single occupancy and geared towards upperclassman. Retail space will be privately rented on the bottom floor of the two buildings. A new dining hall will also be built under Liberty Street Resdience Hall.


In Summer 2007, the College will break ground on a new Biology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry building located at the corner of Calhoun and Coming Streets, the site of present-day K-Lot surface parking lot. The new 130,000 square feet facility is expected to cost $48 million dollars and is the "largest and most expensive construction project ever undertaken by the College," according to the SSM News newsletter of the School of Science and Math. The College is working with the architects of Ballinger, Inc to design the structure. Ballinger is a hamlet and common in the parish of Great Missenden, in Buckinghamshire, England. ...


C of C Facts

Because of the historic look of the campus, many movies have been filmed at the College of Charleston, including Cold Mountain, The Patriot, White Squall, O, and The Notebook. The most popular scene location is Randolph Hall. In 2004, the first televised debate between Senate candidates Jim DeMint and Inez Tenenbaum was filmed in Alumni Hall. ABC's The View and CNN's Crossfire also took up residence on the College of Charleston Cistern before the South Carolina Primary of the 2000 Presidential Election. Cold Mountain is a novel by Charles Frazier, which was adapted by Anthony Minghella into a film in 2003. ... The Patriot is a film released in 2000 that was written by Robert Rodat and directed by Roland Emmerich. ... White Squall is a 1996 movie directed by Ridley Scott, starring Jeff Bridges and John Savage. ... O is a 2001 teen film version of William Shakespeares Othello. ... The Notebook is a film based on a romantic novel by Nicholas Sparks. ... James Warren DeMint (born September 2, 1951) has been a U.S. Senator from South Carolina since 2005. ... Inez Tenenbaum (born March 8, 1951) is a U.S. politician from the state of South Carolina. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ...


The College of Charleston's Department of Art History is one of an elite number of independent art history departments in the United States. It is the second largest in the Southeast after Emory University and among the leading undergraduate art history programs in North America.


The English Department at the College of Charleston publishes Crazyhorse, a national literary magazine.


In 1971, the College of Charleston was listed on the U.S. Department of the Interior's National Register of Historic Places. The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


External links


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m