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Encyclopedia > College football
A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force.
A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force.

College football is American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies. It was the venue through which American football first gained popularity in the United States. College football remains extremely popular today among students, alumni, and other fans of the sport. According to "Bill Stern's Favorite Football Stories" (1948), the most people ever to attend a college football game was 114,000, for the Army-Navy game in 1926. It ended in darkness, in a 21-21 tie. Not to be confused with CIS national football team or CIS (rugby). ... The British Collegiate American Football League (BCAFL) is an American football league consisting of players from various colleges and universities in the United Kingdom. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association football championship is held every early part of the year (January). ... An NCAA tournament game between Indiana University and the University of Tulsa in 2004 College soccer is a term used to describe soccer that is played by teams operated by colleges and universities as opposed to a professional league operated for exclusively financial purposes. ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy, public domain image from af. ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy, public domain image from af. ... Colorado State University is a public institution of higher learning located in Fort Collins, Colorado in the United States. ... The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA or Air Force),[1] located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers for the United States Air Force. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... The United States military academies, sometimes known as the United States service academies, are federal academies for the education and training of commissioned officers for the United States armed forces. ...

Contents

History

A college football game between Texas Tech and Navy.

Modern American football has its origins in various games, all known as "football", played at public schools in England in the mid-19th century. By the 1840s, students at Rugby School in England were playing a game in which players were able to pick up the ball and run with it, a sport later known as Rugby union (or rugby). The game was taken to Canada by British soldiers stationed there and was soon being played at Canadian colleges. An early American football team, from the turn of the twentieth century The history of American football, the most popular spectator sport in the United States,[1] can be traced to early versions of rugby football. ... Download high resolution version (600x721, 91 KB)Caption: 031230-N-9693M-004 Houston, Texas (Dec. ... Download high resolution version (600x721, 91 KB)Caption: 031230-N-9693M-004 Houston, Texas (Dec. ... Texas Tech University is a nationally recognized doctoral/research university located in Lubbock, Texas, established in 1923 originally as Texas Technological College. ... Head coach Paul Johnson 6th year, 45–29 Home stadium Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium Capacity 34,000 - FieldTurf Conference Independent First year 1879 Website NavySports. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term public school has two contrary meanings: In England, one of a small number of prestigious historic schools open to the public which normally charge fees and are financed by bodies other than the state, commonly as private charitable trusts; here the word public is used much as in... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A view of Rugby School from The Close, the playing field where according to legend Rugby was invented Rugby School, located in the town of Rugby, Warwickshire, is one of the oldest public schools in England and is one of the major co-educational boarding schools in the country. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


The first football game played between teams representing American colleges was an unfamiliar ancestor of today's college football, as it was played under rugby-style Association rules [1]. The game between teams from Rutgers College (now Rutgers University) and the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) took place on November 6, 1869 at College Field (now the site of the College Avenue Gymnasium at Rutgers University) in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Rutgers won by a score of 6 "runs" to Princeton's 4.[2][3][4] The 1869 game between Rutgers and Princeton is important in that it is the first documented game of any sport called "football" (which also encompasses the game of "soccer") between two American colleges. It is also notable in that it came a full-two years before a codified rugby game would be played in England. The Princeton/Rutgers game was undoubtedly different from what we today know as American football. Nonetheless it was the forerunner of what evolved into American Football. Another similar game took place between Rutgers and Columbia University in 1870 and the popularity of intercollegiate competition in football would spread throughout the country. “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The College Avenue Gymnasium is an athletic facility on the campus of Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... Nickname: Location of New Brunswick in Middlesex County Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Established December 30, 1730 Incorporated September 1, 1784 Government  - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)  - Mayor James Cahill Area  - City  5. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The American experience with the rugby-style game that led directly to present-day college football continued in 1874 at a meeting in Cambridge, Massachusetts, between Harvard University and Montreal's McGill University. The McGill team played a rugby union-style game, while Harvard played under a set of rules that allowed greater handling of the ball than soccer. The teams agreed to play under compromise rules. The Harvard students took to the rugby rules and adopted them as their own.[5] Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... McGill University is a publicly funded, co-educational research university located in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


The first game of intercollegiate football in America between two American colleges that most resembles the game of today was between Tufts University and Harvard on June 4, 1875 at Jarvis Field in Cambridge, Mass., won by Tufts 1-0 [6]. A report of the outcome of this game appeared in the Boston Daily Globe of June 5, 1875. Jarvis Field was at the time a patch of land at the northern point of the Harvard campus, bordered by Everett and Jarvis Sts. to the north and south, and Oxford St. and Massachusetts Avenue to the east and west. In the Tufts/Harvard game participants were allowed to pick up the ball and run with it, each side fielded eleven men, the ball carrier was stopped by knocking him down or 'tackling' him, and the inflated ball was egg-shaped - the combination of which marks this game as the first game of American Football. A photograph of the 1875 Tufts team commemorating this milestone hangs in the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Indiana. Harvard and Yale also began play in 1875 though under rules that made their game, as well as the aforementioned Princeton/Rutgers game, significantly different from what we know as American Football compared to the Tufts/Harvard contest which is more closely the antecedent to American Football than these other games. The longest running rivalry and most played game between two American colleges is between Lafayette College and Lehigh University. Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... Cambridge City Hall Cambridge is a city in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts, United States. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... South Bend, see South Bend (disambiguation). ... Lafayette College is a private coeducational liberal arts college located in Easton, Pennsylvania, USA. The school, founded in 1826 by citizens of Easton, first began holding classes in 1832. ... Lehigh University is a private, co-educational university located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the United States. ...


Walter Camp, known as the "Father of American Football", is credited with changing the game from a variation of rugby into a unique sport. Camp is responsible for pioneering the play from scrimmage (earlier games featured a rugby scrum), most of the modern elements of scoring, the eleven-man team, and the traditional offensive setup of the seven-man line and the four-man backfield. Camp also had a hand in popularizing the game. He published numerous articles in publications such as Collier's Weekly and Harper's Weekly, and he chose the first College Football All-America Team. Walter Chauncey Camp (April 7, 1859 – March 14, 1925) was a sports writer and football coach known as the Father of American Football. Along with John Heisman, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Glenn Scobey Warner, and George Halas, Camp was one of the most significant people in the history of American football. ... A rugby union scrum. ... Colliers (May 7, 1932) Colliers Weekly was an American magazine founded by Peter Fenelon Collier and published from 1888 to 1957. ... Teresa Bagioli Sickles confession, 1859 Harpers Weekly (A Journal of Civilization) was an American political magazine based in New York City. ... The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective position. ...


College football increased in popularity through the remainder of the 19th century. It also became increasingly violent. In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt threatened to ban the sport following a series of player deaths from injuries suffered during games. The response to this was the formation of what became the National Collegiate Athletic Association, which set rules governing the sport. One of the resulting rule changes was the introduction of the forward pass. Another was the banning of "mass momentum" plays (many of which, like the infamous "flying wedge", were sometimes literally deadly). Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... NCAA redirects here. ... A flying wedge is a charging technique in which troops are arrayed to form a wedge or V shape. ...


Even with the emergence of the NFL, college football remains extremely popular throughout the U.S.[7] Although the college game has a much larger margin for talent than its pro counterpart, the sheer number of fans following major colleges provides a financial equalizer for the game, with Division I programs — the highest level — playing in huge stadiums (four [1] of which have seating capacity exceeding 100,000). In many cases, the college stadiums employ bench-style seating (as opposed to individual seats with backs and arm rests). This allows them to seat more fans in a given amount of space than the typical professional stadium, which tends to be a bit more luxurious. Overall college football draws greatly more attendees than its professional counterpart.[8][9] Seating capacity refers to the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, either in terms of the space available, or in terms of limitations set by law. ...


A lack of a professional franchise is not necessarily an indicator of where the college game is most successful; for example, in California, Ohio, Texas, Pennsylvania, and Florida—states which all have multiple NFL franchises—there are universities that also rank in the upper financial echelons of the college football. In many cases, though both collegiate and professional football teams exist in the same state, they reside in different cities.[citation needed] This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ...


College athletes, unlike professionals, are not permitted by the NCAA to be paid salaries. Many do receive scholarships and financial assistance from the university. An athletic scholarship is a form of scholarship to attend a college or university awarded to an individual based predominantly on their ability to play in a sport. ...


Unlike the early years of college football, the upper echelons of the college football are now dominated by public schools. First-tier conferences are mainly made up of flagship public schools from each state.


Season schedule

The college football season begins two to three weeks earlier than the NFL, toward the end of August. From 1982 until 2003, the regular season was officially ushered in by the Kickoff Classic (other pre-season games such as the Eddie Robinson Classic and the Pigskin Classic have also been played). Recent NCAA rules changes have eliminated these games. The regular season continues through early December, ending with the annual Army-Navy Game and several conference championship games on the same weekend. The Kickoff Classic was a season-opening college football game played at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey from 1983 to 2002. ... The Pigskin Classic was a season-opening college football game played at Anahiem Stadium from 1990-1994, and continued from 1995-2002 at various stadiums. ... M*A*S*H, see The Army-Navy Game (M*A*S*H episode). ...


The postseason consists of a series of bowl games that showcase top college teams. Bowl games generally match two teams of similar standing from different conferences, although some pit a high ranked team from a smaller conference against a lower ranked team from a more prestigious one. Division I Bowl Subdivision (still widely known by its former designation of Division I-A) football is the only NCAA sport which does not decide its champion with a playoff. In the past, the unofficial national champion was determined by various polls, such as the AP Poll, Coaches Poll, and the United Press International Poll. This system was problematic because two polls often named different champions. The 2005-06 NCAA college football bowl season was a series of 33 post-season games (including the Bowl Championship Series) that was played in December 2005 and January 2006 for Division I-A football teams and all-stars from Divisions I-AA, II, and III, as well as from... A bowl game is a post-season college football game, typically at the Division I-A level. ... The Associated Press (AP) Poll, along with the USA Today Coaches Poll, ranks the top 25 NCAA Division I college football and basketball teams, weekly. ... The USA Today Coaches Poll is the current name for a weekly ranking of the top 25 NCAA Division I-A college football and Division I college basketball teams. ... Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. “UPI” redirects here. ...


Since 1998, the National Championship has been determined by the Bowl Championship Series. This formula, incorporating numerous computer rankings and human polls, is used to determine the top two teams in the country.[10] From 1998 to 2005, the two teams competed in one of the four BCS bowl games in a set rotation. Starting in the 2006 season, the BCS National Championship Game, was added. The game is played after completion of the BCS Bowls and the site rotates every year between the four BCS Bowls: the Rose Bowl, Fiesta Bowl, Orange Bowl, and Sugar Bowl. The first BCS Championship game was held on January 8, 2007 in the new University of Phoenix Stadium, the new home of the Fiesta Bowl. This system is not without controversy. Some critics argue that the system unfairly favors teams from large conferences and that the process used to select the teams can be just as ambiguous as the earlier poll system. Also, the Bowl Championship Series champion has not always been the undisputed national champion; for example, in 2003, the Associated Press and Bowl Championship Series chose different champions, which is what the system was designed to prevent. However, most years do have a consensus national champion. On the other hand, as recent years have proven, a team with an unblemished, undefeated record does not always guarantee at least a share of the National Championship. BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is a selection system designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner crowned the BCS national champion. ... The BCS National Championship Game or BCS title game is the final bowl game of the annual Bowl Championship Series and is intended by Series organizers to determine the NCAA Division I-A national football championship. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... | {{Infobox_Stadium | stadium_name = University of Phoenix Stadium | image = | address = 1 Cardinals Drive, Glendale, AZ 85305 | construction start = July 30, 2003 | opened = August 1, 2006 | owner = Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority | operator = Global Spectrum | surface = Tifway 419 Hybrid Bermuda Grass | construction_cost = $455 million | architect = Peter Eisenman|HOK Sport | former_names = Cardinals Stadium (August... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


The season concludes with series of all-star bowl games in January. These include the East-West Shrine Game, the Gridiron Classic, the Hula Bowl, the Senior Bowl, and the newly-established Texas vs. The Nation Game. However, the Gridiron Classic was recently declared canceled for 2006 because of lack of sponsorship.[11] All-star (also, Allstar or All Star) is a term with meanings in both the worlds of sports and entertainment. ... The East-West Shrine Game is an annual post-season college football all-star game played each January since 1926. ... The Gridiron Classic is an annual post-season college football all-star game featuring a team representing Florida versus a team from the rest of the United States. ... The Hula Bowl is an independently administered post-season invitational college football game held each year in Hawaii, currently at Aloha Stadium in the Hālawa district of Honolulu, Hawaii. ... The Senior Bowl is an all-star college football exhibition game usually played either at or towards the end of the college football season in January. ... The Texas vs. ...


The length of the season has gradually increased over the course of the game's history. In spring 2005, the NCAA ruled that teams could schedule twelve regular-season games (up from eleven) beginning in the 2006 season.[12] This decision was met with some criticism from those who claimed that expanding the season would overwork the athletes.[13]

See also: 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football rankings, 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season, NCAA Division I-A national football championship, List of college bowl games, Mythical National Championship, and BCS National Championship Game

Three human polls and one formulaic ranking make up the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) football rankings, in addition to various publications preseason polls. ... The 2007 NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) football season, or the college football season, began on August 30, 2007,[1] progresses through the regular season and bowl season, and (aside from all-star exhibition games that will follow) will conclude with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship... The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship... // From the 1998 season until the 2005 season, four BCS bowls have determined the national champion on a rotating basis. ... A mythical national championship (often abbreviated MNC) is a national championship that is won without a tournament to determine an undisputed national champion. ... The BCS National Championship Game or BCS title game is the final bowl game of the annual Bowl Championship Series and is intended by Series organizers to determine the NCAA Division I-A national football championship. ...

Official rules and notable rule distinctions

See also: American football

Although rules for the high school, college, and NFL games are generally consistent, there are hundreds of differences. The NCAA Football Rules Committee determines the playing rules for Division I (both Bowl and Championship Subdivisions), II, and III games (the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) is a separate organization, but uses the NCAA rules). United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (better known as the NAIA) traces its roots to the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball. ...

  • A pass is ruled complete if one of the receiver's feet are inbounds at the time of the catch. In the NFL, both feet must be inbounds.
  • A player is considered down when any part of his body other than the feet or hands touches the ground (from a tackle or otherwise). In the NFL, a player is active until he is tackled or forced down another way by a member of the opposing team (down by contact).
  • A play may not begin until the referee declares the ball ready for play, at which time the play clock (25 seconds) starts. In the NFL, a similar rule requires the next play to begin within 40 seconds from the end of the previous play.
  • The clock starts when the referee declares the ball ready for play, unless the previous play was ruled out of bounds. The clock then starts on the snap. The clock does stop to allow the officials to move the chains.
  • Overtime was introduced to Division I-A in 1996, eliminating ties. When a game goes to overtime, each team is given one possession from its opponent's twenty-five yard line. The team leading after both possessions is declared the winner. If the teams remain tied, overtime periods continue, with a coin flip determining the possession order and field side for each overtime, until one team leads the other at the end of the overtime. Starting with the 3rd overtime, teams must attempt a two-point conversion after they score a touchdown. (In the NFL, overtime is decided by a 15-minute sudden-death quarter, and regular season games can still end in a tie if neither team scores. Overtime for regular season games in the NFL began with the 1974 season.)
  • Tries are attempted from the three-yard line. The NFL uses the two-yard line.
  • The defensive team may score two points on a point-after touchdown attempt by returning a blocked kick, fumble, or interception into the opposition's end zone. In addition, if the defensive team gains possession, but then moves backwards into the endzone and is stopped, a one point safety will be awarded to the offense. In the NFL, a conversion attempt ends when the defending team gains possession of the football.
  • The two-minute warning is not used in college football, except in rare cases where the scoreboard clock has malfunctioned and is not being used.
  • There is an option to use instant replay review of officiating decisions. Division I-Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) schools use replay in virtually all games; replay is rarely used in lower division games. Every play is subject to booth review with coaches only having one challenge. In the NFL, challenges are only automatic in the final two minutes of each half.
  • In the 2006 season, the game clock was started when the ball was declared ready for play after the defensive team (during a scrimmage down) or the receiving kick (during a free kick down) was awarded a first down, reducing the time of games. This rule only lasted one year.
  • In the 1984 season, the ball was placed on the 30-yard line (instead of the 20) if a kickoff sailed through the end zone on the fly and untouched. This rule was rescinded after one year.
  • Among other rule changes to 2007, kickoffs have been moved from the 35-yard (32 m) line back five yards (4.57 m) to the 30-yard (30 m) line to match that of the NFL. Some coaches and officials are questioning this rule change as it could lead to more injuries to the players as there will likely be more kickoff returns.[14] The rationale for the rule change was to help reduce dead time in the game.[15]

Overtime is an additional period of play specified under the rules of a sport in order to bring the game to a decision and avoid declaring the contest a tie or draw. ... NFL redirects here. ... The 1974 NFL season was the 55th regular season of the National Football League. ... A try is a scrimmage down which is neither timed nor numbered, awarded to a team who has just scored a 6 point touchdown, from close to their opponents goal line (2-yard line in the NFL, 3 yard line NCAA & NFHS). ... In the National Football League, the two-minute warning is given when two minutes of game time remain on the game clock in each half of a game, i. ...

National championships

The Bear Bryant Trophy, the AP national championship trophy Division I-A football is the only NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion. ... NCAA Division I-AA Football Champions 1978 Florida A&M 35-28 Massachusetts 1979 Eastern Kentucky 30-7 Lehigh 1980 Boise State 31-29 Eastern Kentucky 1981 Idaho State 34-23 Eastern Kentucky 1982 Eastern Kentucky 17-14 Delaware 1983 Southern Illinois 43-7 Western Carolina 1984 Montana State 19... The NCAA Division I-AA Mid Major National Football Championship began in 2001. ... Logo for the 2005 Division II National Championship game The NCAA Division II National Football Championship began in 1973. ... The logo for the 2006 Division III National Championship game. ... The NAIA national football championship is decided by a post-season playoff system featuring the best NAIA college football teams in the United States. ... NJCAA National football Championships ...

Team maps

Bowl games

2006-2007 Bowl Games per state (and Canada)
Main article: Bowl game

Unlike every other sport -- collegiate or professional -- the Football Bowl Subdivision, formerly known as Division I-A college football, does not employ a playoff system to determine a champion. Instead, it has a series of "bowl games." The annual national champion is determined by a vote of sports writers and other non-players. This system has been challenged but little headway has been made given the entrenched vested economic interests in the various bowls. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (841x580, 16 KB) derived from [1]; map of states with 2006-07 NCAA football bowl games schools (and their division) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (841x580, 16 KB) derived from [1]; map of states with 2006-07 NCAA football bowl games schools (and their division) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A bowl game is a post-season college football game, typically at the Division I-A level. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


A bowl game is a post-season college football game, typically in the Division I Bowl Subdivision. The first bowl game was the 1902 Rose Bowl, played between Michigan and Stanford; Michigan won 49-0. The term originates from the shape of the stadium in Pasadena, California where the game is played. Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... Stanford redirects here. ... The Rose Bowl is an outdoor football stadium in Pasadena, California, a suburb of Los Angeles. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ...


At the Division I FBS level, teams must earn the right to be bowl eligible by winning at least 6 games during the season. They are then invited to a bowl game based on their conference ranking and the tie-ins that the conference has to each bowl game. For the 2006 season, there are 32 bowl games, so 64 of the 120 Division I FBS teams will be invited to play at a bowl. These games are played from mid-December to early January and most of the later bowl games are typically considered more prestigious. The term bowl eligible refers to any NCAA football team that is able to play in one of the 32 bowl games that are a part of the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS; formerly Division I-A) season. ... A tie-in is an authorized product that is based on an existing or upcoming media property, such as a movie or video/DVD, computer game, video game, television program/television series, board game, web site, role-playing game or literary property. ...


After the Bowl Championship Series, additional all-star bowl games round out the post-season schedule through the beginning of February.


Bowl Championship Series (BCS)

The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other for a National Championship game. The system also selects matchups for the other prestigious BCS bowl games. The ten teams selected include the conference champion from each of the six BCS conferences plus four others ("at-large" selections). The top-ranked and second-ranked teams are pitted in the BCS National Championship Game in order to crown an unofficial NCAA Division I FBS national football champion. The winner is also required to be voted number one by the Coaches Poll. It has been in place since the 1998 season. Prior to the 2006 season eight teams competed in four BCS Bowls. The BCS replaced the Bowl Alliance (in place from 1995–1997), which followed the Bowl Coalition (in place from 1992–1994). BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is a selection system designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner crowned the BCS national champion. ... Image File history File links Foxbcslogo. ... The BCS National Championship Game or BCS title game is the final bowl game of the annual Bowl Championship Series and is intended by Series organizers to determine the NCAA Division I-A national football championship. ... The BCS Conferences are the six major NCAA Division I-A conferences that receive an automatic bid into the Bowl Championship Series every year. ... The BCS National Championship Game or BCS title game is the final bowl game of the annual Bowl Championship Series and is intended by Series organizers to determine the NCAA Division I-A national football championship. ... The Bear Bryant Trophy, the AP national championship trophy Division I-A football is the only NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion. ... The USA Today Coaches Poll is the current name for a weekly ranking of the top 25 NCAA Division I-A college football and Division I college basketball teams. ... The 1998 NCAA Division I-A football season was the first of the Bowl Championship Series, which crowned Tennessee its national champion, the schools first since the 1950s and one year after mega star quarterback Peyton Manning left for the NFL. The BCS combined elements of the old Bowl... The 2006 NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) football season, or the college football season, began on August 31, 2006 and, aside from all-star exhibition games that follow, concluded with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship Game on January 8, 2007 in Glendale, Arizona, USA, where the... The Bowl Alliance was an agreement among college football bowl games for the purpose of trying to match the top two teams in a national championship bowl game and to provide quality bowl game matchups for the champions of its member conferences. ... The Bowl Coalition was an agreement among college football bowl games for the purpose of trying to match the top two teams in a national championship bowl game and to provide quality bowl game matchups for the champions of its member conferences. ...

See also: List of college bowl games and NCAA football bowl games, 2006-07

// From the 1998 season until the 2005 season, four BCS bowls have determined the national champion on a rotating basis. ... The 2006-07 NCAA College Football Bowl Games post-season schedule followed the 2006 NCAA Division I FBS regular season in college football. ...

See also

College football Portal

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The 2007 NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) football season, or the college football season, began on August 30, 2007,[1] progresses through the regular season and bowl season, and (aside from all-star exhibition games that will follow) will conclude with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship... College football on television includes the broadcasting of college football games, as well as pre- and post-game reports, analysis, and human-interest stories. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... Pairs of schools, colleges and universities, especially when they are close to each other either geographically or in their areas of specialization, often establish a college rivalry with each other over the years. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The List of Division I-FBS college football stadiums includes stadiums that currently serve as the home venue for NCAA Division I-Bowl Subdivision college football teams. ... This is a list of schools in Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the United States National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). ... This is a list of schools in Division I of the United States National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) that play football as a varsity sport and are members of the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS), known as Division I-AA from 1978 through 2005. ... Last season played in parentheses // American University (c. ... Big Eight Conference (also called Big Six and Big Seven) Big West Conference Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association Indiana Collegiate Athletic Conference Missouri Valley Conference Nebraska Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Nebraska-Iowa Athletic Conference Pacific Coast Athletic Association Pacific Coast Conference Skyline Conference Southwest Conference Wisconsin State University Conference Yankee Conference Category... Arkansas-Little Rock Belmont Binghamton Charlotte Chicago State Cleveland State Coppin State Fairleigh Dickinson George Mason Georgia State IPFW IUPUI Kennesaw State Lipscomb Longwood New Orleans North Florida Oakland Quinnipiac Radford South Alabama Texas-Pan American Texas-San Antonio UC Irvine University of Maryland Baltimore County UMKC UNC-Asheville UNC... TV markets are defined by Nielsen Media Research, and are sorted by their rank in the 2007-08 television season. ... A aerial view of the Melbourne Cricket Ground during the 1992 Cricket World Cup final packed with 90,000 people. ... This is a list of undefeated Division I-A football teams, which describes all teams that finished the NCAA College Football season without any losses. ... The NAIA national football championship is decided by a post-season playoff system featuring the best NAIA college football teams in the United States. ... Logo for the 2007 NCAA Division I Football Championship Game // The NCAA Division I Football Championship is a college football game played to determine the champion of the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly known as Division I-AA). ... Logo for the 2005 Division II National Championship game The NCAA Division II National Football Championship began in 1973. ... The logo for the 2006 Division III National Championship game. ... NJCAA National football Championships ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... College hockey most often refers to the American hockey competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. There are 3 national divisions each having many conferences, and supporting both mens and womens teams. ... The British Collegiate American Football League (BCAFL) is an American football league consisting of players from various colleges and universities in the United Kingdom. ... CIS Logo. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.scarletknights.com/football/history/first-game.asp - note that the London Football Association's rules were adopted at the time
  2. ^ NFL History at the National Football League website, accessed 10 September 2006.
  3. ^ Rutgers Through the Years (timeline), published by Rutgers University (no further authorship information available), accessed 12 January 2007.
  4. ^ Tradition at www.scarletknights.com. Published by Rutgers University Athletic Department (no further authorship information available), accessed 10 September 2006.
  5. ^ Infamous 1874 McGill-Harvard game turns 132 at McGill Athletics, published by McGill University (no further authorship information available). This article incorporates text from the McGill University Gazette (April 1874), two issues of The Montreal Gazette (14 May and 19 May 1874). Accessed 29 January 2007.
  6. ^ Smith, R.A. "Sports and Freedom: The Rise of Big-Time College Athletics", New York: Oxford University Press, 1988
  7. ^ Harris Interactive Poll "While Still the Nation's Favorite Sport, Professional Football Drops in Popularity Baseball and college football are next in popularity" http://sev.prnewswire.com/sports/20070109/NYTU17309012007-1.html
  8. ^ NCAA 2006 Attendance Statistics http://www.ncaa.org/stats/football/attendance/2006/2006_football_attendance.pdf
  9. ^ NFL 2006 Attendance Press Release http://www.nfl.com/news/story/10087448
  10. ^ About the BCS (HTML) (English). Bowl Championship Series. Retrieved on 2006-07-18.
  11. ^ Gridiron Classic Will Not Be Played In 2006 (HTML) (English). Florida Citrus Sports (August 19, 2005). Retrieved on 2006-07-18.
  12. ^ Div. I-A Football Gets 12th Game (HTML). NCAA (April 19, 2005). Retrieved on 2006-07-18.
  13. ^ NCAA ponders adding 12th game to college football season (HTML). Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (2004-11-22). Retrieved on 2006-11-22.
  14. ^ Kickoffs from 30-yard (30 m) line could create more returns, injuries (HTML). AP (April 16, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  15. ^ NCAA Football Rules Committee Votes To Restore Plays While Attempting To Maintain Shorter Overall Game Time (HTML) (English). NCAA (February 14, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-17.

The London Football Association is the regional Football Association for Greater London. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Image File history File links College_football. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

College football awards:
Best player awards:
Heisman Memorial Trophy
Maxwell Award | Walter Camp Award
Bronko Nagurski Trophy (Best Defenseman)
Chuck Bednarik Award (Best Defenseman)
Dave Rimington Trophy (Best C)
Davey O'Brien Award (Best QB)
Dick Butkus Award (Best LB)
Doak Walker Award (Best RB)
Draddy Trophy (Academic Heisman)
Fred Biletnikoff Award (Best WR)
Jim Thorpe Award (Best DB)
John Mackey Award (Best TE)
Johnny Unitas Award (Best Senior QB)
Lombardi Award (Best Lineman or LB)
Lott Trophy (Defensive impact)
Lou Groza Award (Best PK)
Manning Award (Best QB)
Mosi Tatupu Award (Best spec. teams)
Outland Trophy (Best IOL or DL)
Ray Guy Award (Best P)
Sammy Baugh Trophy (Best QB)
Ted Hendricks Award (Best DE)
Wuerffel Trophy (Humanitarian-Athlete)
Paul “Bear” Bryant Coach of the Year | Home Depot Coach of the Year
Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year | Walter Camp Coach of the Year
Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year | Broyles Assistant Coach of the Year
Walter Payton Award (Best Div. I FCS Off.) | Buck Buchanan Award (Best Div. I FCS Def.)
Harlon Hill Trophy (Div. II) | Gagliardi Trophy (Div. III) | Melberger Award (Div. III)

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