FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > College Basketball
Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest.
Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest.

College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 568 pixelsFull resolution (992 × 704 pixel, file size: 425 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this image February 17, 2007 during the first half between the Illinois State Redbirds & the Ball State Cardinals in an ESPN Bracketbuster game. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 568 pixelsFull resolution (992 × 704 pixel, file size: 425 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this image February 17, 2007 during the first half between the Illinois State Redbirds & the Ball State Cardinals in an ESPN Bracketbuster game. ... A Division I (I-AA in football) athletic program. ... Ball State Universitys athletic teams are called the Cardinals. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the sport. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...

College basketball Portal

Contents

Image File history File links Portal. ...

History

Further information: NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship records

The game of basketball was invented by Dr. James Naismith in 1891. The first recorded game involving a college basketball team took place in Pittsburgh area town of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania on April 8, 1893, when a team from Geneva College defeated nearby New Brighton YMCA [1] [2]. The first intercollegiate game was played on February 9, 1895, when the Minnesota State School of Agriculture (now the University of Minnesota St. Paul campus) defeated Hamline College by a score of 9 to 3. The first intercollegiate game involving the now familiar five-player format occurred in Iowa City, Iowa on January 18, 1896, when the University of Chicago defeated the University of Iowa 15 to 12. Before that time, there were usually seven to nine players on each team. // * Vacated this due to NCAA violations. ... James A. Naismith, B.A., M.A., M.D., D.D, (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was the inventor of the sport of basketball and the first to introduce the use of a helmet in American football. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ... Beaver Falls is a city located in Beaver County, Pennsylvania. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Geneva College is located in the College Hill neighborhood of Beaver Falls, which sits above the more southerly parts of the city. ... New Brighton is a borough located in Beaver County, Pennsylvania. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Hamline University was founded in 1854 in Red Wing, Minnesota, USA, as the first institution of higher education in the state. ... Iowa City is a city in Johnson County, Iowa, United States. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... Not to be confused with Iowa State University. ...


By the turn of the 20th Century, enough colleges were fielding basketball teams that leagues began to form. The NCAA was founded in Chicago in 1906. The first NCAA Men's College Basketball Championship tournament was held before 5,500 fans at Northwestern University's Patton Gymnasium in Evanston, Illinois in 1939. That year, Oregon beat Ohio State 46 to 33 in the final game to win the national championship. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Northwestern. ... Incorporated City in 1872. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ...


The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) was also a thriving tournament in those days, generally thought to be of as much quality as the NCAA Tournament, just with different teams and a more New York or East Coast feel to it. In fact, the NIT was formed the year before the NCAA created their championship tournament. By the early 1950s, the NCAA had taken over as the dominant tournament and the NIT became a place for postseason play for those teams that couldn't quite make the "Big Dance". It is still played at Madison Square Garden. The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... // Final four redirects here. ...


The first college games to be televised took place at Madison Square Garden in 1940. Pittsburgh defeated Fordham, 57 to 37, and NYU beat Georgetown, 50 to 27. Since the advent of television, the popularity of college basketball has exploded. March Madness is consistently one of the most watched events of the year and draws over 700,000 fans in person. CBS SportsLine's "NCAA March Madness On Demand" initiative served more than 14 million streams of live online video from the first 56 games of the 2006 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship. Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Pittsburgh, commonly referred to as Pitt, is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[2] in the United States, with three residential campuses located in and around New York City. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... The Georgetown Hoyas are the athletics teams that officially represent Georgetown University in college sports. ... Disambiguation: March Madness comes from the phrase Mad as a March Hare. In England, the phrase March Madness may refer to wasteful spending at the end of a budget year. ...


African-Americans and College Basketball

In 1904, 13 years after basketball was invented, and after being exposed to the game over the summer at Harvard University, Coach Edwin Henderson introduced basketball to a physical education class at Howard University in Washington, D. C. By 1910, basketball was one of the most popular sports among young African-Americans. The game could be played on almost any surface, and it required little or no equipment. It was promoted largely in the Young Men’s Christian Associations (YMCAs) in Black neighborhoods, on basketball courts indoors and outdoors, at parks and on playgrounds. Edwin B. Henderson (1884-1977), widely recognized as the Father of Black Basketball, introduced basketball in Washington, D.C. in 1904 to African Americans on a wide scale, organized basis. ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. An historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... YMCAs in the United States and Canada use this logo. ...


By 1915, African-Americans played basketball in high school physical education classes, on college and university squads, and on club teams representing major urban cities. Some of the first predominantly Black universities to form basketball teams include Hampton University in Virginia; Lincoln University in Pennsylvania; Wilberforce University in Ohio; and Virginia Union in Richmond. In 1916, the all-Black Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) was formed, uniting Virginia Union, Shaw University (Raleigh, North Carolina), Lincoln and Howard in competition. Hampton University (formerly Hampton Institute) is an American University located in Hampton, Virginia. ... Lincoln University in Pennsylvania is a four-year University located on 350 acres in southern Chester County. ... Wilberforce University, located in Wilberforce, Ohio, was founded in 1856. ... Virginia Union University is an historically black university located in Richmond, Virginia, which was founded in 1865 by a former slave trader. ... The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... Shaw University is a historically black college located in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. It offers several undergraduate degrees in the fine and liberal arts as well as natural science, and also degrees in allied health, business, public administration, education and computer science. ...


Four years later, the all-Black Southeastern Athletic Conference was established, and by 1928 there were four all-Black regional conferences.


At the college level, African-American athletes such as Paul Robeson at Rutgers University, Wilbur Wood at Nebraska, Fenwich Watkins at the University of Vermont and Cumberland Posey at Penn State and Duquesne became basketball stars before World War I in white major-college programs. Paul LeRoy Bustill Robeson (April 9, 1898 – January 23, 1976) was a multi-lingual American actor, athlete, bass-baritone concert singer, writer, civil rights activist, Communist sympathizer, Spingarn Medal winner, and Lenin Peace Prize laureate. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, or simply The University of Vermont, is a public university located in Burlington, Vermont. ... Cumberland Willis Cum Posey (June 20, 1890 - March 28, 1946) was an American player, manager and team owner in baseballs Negro Leagues. ... The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


George Gregory, Jr., the 6'-4" captain and center of the Columbia University team from 1928-1931, became the first African American all-American college basketball player, in 1931. George Gregory, Jr. ... Alma Mater Columbia University in the City of New York is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Several black college basketball programs stood out. Xavier University of Louisiana won 67 games and lost only two between 1934 and 1938, and Alabama State University, Lincoln University in Missouri, Morgan State University in Maryland and Wiley College in Texas all produced exceptional basketball programs. Xavier University of Louisiana is a historically African-American Roman Catholic University located off Carrollton Avenue in Mid-City New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Alabama State Hornets logo Alabama State University, founded 1867, is a historically black university located in Montgomery, Alabama. ... Lincoln University of Missouri is located in Jefferson City. ... Morgan State University, formerly Centenary Biblical Institute (1867-1890), Morgan College (1890 -1975), is located in residential Baltimore, Maryland. ... Wiley College is one of the first and oldest historically black college west of the Mississippi River and is located on the west side of Marshall, Texas. ...


From the 1920s until 1947, few African-American players were allowed in major college programs. One notable exception was Jackie Robinson, a multi-sport star (1939-1941) at UCLA just before World War II, who went on to greater fame for breaking Major League Baseball's 20th-century color line. Robinson's honors at UCLA were impressive: for two years highest scorer in basketball competition in the Pacific Coast Conference, national champion long (then "broad") jumper, the school's first athlete to letter in four sports, All-American football halfback and varsity baseball shortstop. He left UCLA in 1941 because of financial pressures, not many credits from a bachelor's degree. Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... The baseball color line was the policy, unwritten for nearly its entire duration, which excluded African American baseball players from organized baseball in the United States before 1946. ... The Pacific Coast Conference (PCC) was a college athletic conference in the United States, now defunct. ...


In 1947, William Garrett integrated big-time college basketball by joining the basketball program at Indiana University. He broke the gentlemen's agreement that had barred black players from the Big Ten Conference, at that time college basketball's most important conference. While enduring taunts from opponents and pervasive segregation at home and on the road, Garrett became the best player Indiana had ever had, an all-American, and, in 1951, the third African-American drafted in the NBA. Within a year of his graduation from IU, there were six African-American basketball players on Big Ten teams. William Leon Garrett (April 4, 1929 - August 7, 1974), was the first African American basketball player in the Big Ten athletic conference. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation) The Big Ten Conference is the United States oldest Division I college athletic conference. ...


Indiana was an unlikely place for a civil rights breakthrough. It was stone-cold isolationist, widely segregated and hostile to change. But in the late 1940s, Indiana had a leader of the largest black YMCA in the world, which viewed sports as a wedge for broader integration; a visionary university president, who believed his institution belonged to all citizens of the state; a passion for high school and college basketball; and a teenager who was, as nearly as any civil rights pioneer has ever been, the perfect person for his time and role. Slowly from there, Division I college basketball became integrated.


The Loyola University (Chicago) teams of the early 1960s, coached by George Ireland, are thought to be responsible for ushering in a new era of racial equality in the sport by shattering all remaining color barriers in NCAA men's basketball. Beginning in 1961, Loyola broke the longstanding gentlemen's agreement (not to play more than three black players at any given time), putting as many as four black players on the court at every game. [3] For the 1962-63 season, Ireland played four black Loyola starters in every game. That season, Loyola also became the first team in NCAA Division I history to play an all-black lineup, doing so in a game against Wyoming in December of 1962. [4] A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago. ... A Gentlemens agreement is an informal agreement between two parties. ... The University of Wyoming is a land-grant university located in Laramie, Wyoming, situated on Wyomings high Laramie Plains, at an elevation of 7,200 feet (2194 m), between the the Laramie and Snowy Range mountains. ...


In 1963, Loyola shocked the nation and changed college basketball forever by starting four black players in the NCAA Championship game, as well as playing five black players during the game. Loyola's stunning upset of two-time defending NCAA champion Cincinnati, in overtime by a score of 60-58, was the crowning achievement in the school's nearly decade long struggle with racial inequality in men's college basketball, highlighted by the tumultuous events of that year's NCAA Tournament. [5] Loyola's 1963 NCAA title was historic not only for the racial makeup of Loyola's team, but also due to the fact that Cincinnati had started 3 black players, making 7 of the ten starter's in the 1963 NCAA Championship game black. [6] The Cincinnati Bearcats are the NCAA athletic teams representing the University of Cincinnati. ... The 1963 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ...


Another memorable event for African-Americans in college basketball came three years later in the 1966 NCAA championship game, in which Texas Western College (now University of Texas at El Paso) coach Don Haskins started five African-American players. The Miners beat favorite Kentucky 72-65 to win the 1966 NCAA title. The team's victory inspired the 2006 movie Glory Road. (Contrary to the film’s treatment, the racial and social significance of the 1966 game has been entirely in retrospect.) The 1966 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 22 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The University of Texas at El Paso, popularly known as UTEP, is a public, coeducational university, and it is a member of the University of Texas System. ... The University of Texas at El Paso, popularly known as UTEP, is a public, coeducational university, and it is a member of the University of Texas System. ... Donald L. Don Haskins (born March 16, 1930 in Enid, Oklahoma, United States) is a former collegiate basketball coach and player. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ... Glory Road is a 2006 film released on January 13, 2006. ...


In 1970, Illinois State hired Will Robinson as the first African-American head coach of a major college basketball program[7]. Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Division I (I-AA in football) athletic program. ... Will Robinson (born June 3, 1911) is a former college basketball coach and scout. ...


In 1984, John Thompson Jr. became the first African-American head coach to win the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship when the Georgetown Hoyas defeated the University of Houston 84-75. In 2007, his son, John Thompson III led the Hoyas to the Final Four becoming the first father-son coaching duo, regardless of race, to lead their respective teams to a Final Four appearance[8]. For other persons named John Thompson, see John Thompson (disambiguation). ... The Georgetown University Mens Basketball team (which, like all sports teams at Georgetown University, is named the Georgetown Hoyas) is a well-known basketball program in the NCAA. Georgetowns first intercollegiate mens basketball team was formed in 1907; the team played its first game February 9, 1907... John Thompson III John Thompson III (born March 11, 1966) is the current head coach of the Georgetown Hoyas, the mens basketball team at Georgetown University. ... // Final four redirects here. ...


Division I Men's Basketball

The Big Ten holds the record for most Final Four appearances, dating back to the first Final Four in 1939:

Conference* Final Fours
Big Ten 44
Big East 41
ACC 39
Big 12 33
Pac 10 30
SEC 27

* Based on teams currently in the conference


Over the last ten years, the ACC and Big Ten have combined for nearly half of all Final Four appearances:

Conference Final Fours 1997-2006
ACC 10
Big Ten 9
Big 12 5
SEC 5
Pac 10 4
Big East 3
C-USA 2
CAA 1
WAC 1

As of the 2006-07 season, there are currently 336 colleges and universities fielding Division I Men's Basketball teams. 49 states, as well as the District of Columbia, boast at least one Division I Men's Basketball program; only Alaska has none. (North Dakota State University and South Dakota State University joined Division I during the 2005-2006 season, becoming the first schools from their respective states to play at the Division I level.) The 2006-07 NCAA Division I mens basketball season began on November 7, 2006, progressed through the regular season and conference tournaments, and concluded with the 2007 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament Championship Game on April 2, 2007 at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, Georgia. ... A college (Latin collegium) can be the name of any group of colleagues; originally it meant a group of people living together under a common set of rules (con-, together + leg-, law). As a consequence members of colleges were originally styled fellow and still are in some places. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) None[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... North Dakota State University (NDSU) is a public university in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S. It is the second largest school in the eleven campus North Dakota University System. ... South Dakota State University is home to Julia, the Alaskan. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


Conferences

A map of all NCAA Division I basketball teams.
A map of all NCAA Division I basketball teams.
A map of all NCAA Division II basketball teams.
A map of all NCAA Division II basketball teams.

These teams play in 31 different conferences, some of which are considered either major, mid-major, or low-major conferences by the general public and sports media. Due to the term low-major having degrading connotations, some major media outlets and analysts have recently taken to calling the upper-tier of the non-BCS conferences "high-majors" while calling the bottom 16 of the 31 conferences "mid-majors".[9][10][11] These distinctions are all unofficial; in fact, there is no real definition as to what makes a college basketball conference a major, high-major, or mid-major outside of being a BCS member in football. After all, the winners of all 30 conference tournaments (plus the Ivy League's regular-season champion) receive an automatic bid to play in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament alongside 34 at-large selections made by the selection committee during the selection process. Most of the 34 at-large selections on Selection Sunday go to major-conference teams. The following are currently considered by most experts to be the major conferences in college basketball: [12] [13] [14] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 431 pixelsFull resolution (2555 × 1375 pixel, file size: 271 KB, MIME type: image/png) a map of all division I basketball teams I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 431 pixelsFull resolution (2555 × 1375 pixel, file size: 271 KB, MIME type: image/png) a map of all division I basketball teams I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 431 pixelsFull resolution (2555 × 1375 pixel, file size: 270 KB, MIME type: image/png) a map of all Division 2 teams I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 431 pixelsFull resolution (2555 × 1375 pixel, file size: 270 KB, MIME type: image/png) a map of all Division 2 teams I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... Mid Major is a term mainly used in American college basketball and to a lesser extent college football to describe schools not affiliated with a BCS or other major conference. ... Mid Major is a term mainly used in American college basketball and to a lesser extent college football to describe schools not affiliated with a BCS or other major conference. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... Mid Major is a term mainly used in American college basketball and to a lesser extent college football to describe schools not affiliated with a BCS or other major conference. ... BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner being the BCS national champion. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... At-large bids is a term used to refer to bids or berths in a sporting tournament granted by invitation, not by right. ... The selection process for College Basketballs NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship determines which 65 teams will enter the tournament, known as March Madness, and where they will be seeded and placed in the bracket. ... Selection Sunday is the day when the NCAA College basketball tournament participants are announced, placed and seeded accordingly. ...


Finally, two schools from "mid-major" conferences have been accepted as "major" programs, despite their conference affiliation: [15] [16] The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation) The Big Ten Conference is the United States oldest Division I college athletic conference. ... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ... The Pacific Ten Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ...

Gonzaga's present day situation in the West Coast Conference is much like UNLV's situation was in the Big West Conference in the early 1990s, as a widely recognized "major" program despite its conference affiliation. Since making the Elite Eight in 1999, the Bulldogs have made the tournament field every year, even in the one year they failed to win the West Coast Conference tournament. They play a nationally competitive nonconference schedule, frequently winning against teams from "power" conferences, and have been a fixture in the national rankings for most of the years since (they had a subpar 2006-07 season by their recent standards, but still reached the NCAA tournament). The Gonzaga Bulldogs (also known as the Zags) are the athletic teams at Gonzaga University; the term applies to any of the schools varsity teams. ... The University of Memphis is a public American research university located in Memphis, Tennessee, United States, and is the flagship public research university of the Tennessee Board of Regents system. ... The West Coast Conference is an NCAA collegiate athletic conference consisting of eight member schools in California, Oregon, and Washington. ... The playoff term Elite Eight has been popularized to refer to the final eight teams in the NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament, who play in the final game of each of the tournaments four regional brackets. ... This article is about the year. ...


Memphis was arguably the biggest basketball victim of the cycle of conference realignment that took place from 2003 through 2005. The Tigers had previously been one of several perennially strong programs in Conference USA, which at the time was unanimously considered a major basketball conference. However, when the dust settled from the wave of realignment, all of the Conference USA basketball powers except for Memphis had moved on to other conferences, most of them to the Big East.


The current members of the six BCS conferences and the Mountain West Conference (MWC) have won every NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship since 1967, although some teams' championships predate their memberships in their current conferences (including all championships from MWC members). // Final four redirects here. ...


The term "mid-major" is now used in two distinct senses. Some use it to describe all Division I schools outside of the recognized "major" conferences: the members of the remaining D-I conferences, plus independent schools not belonging to a conference:

However, the term is increasingly being used to describe a smaller group of conferences that generally produce quality teams, most of which frequently send at least one at-large team to the tournament field. This is the group of conferences that have routinely finished as the 8th through 15th rated conferences in recent years (post 2004): [17] The Atlantic 10 Conference (A10) is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in the eastern United States; it also has two member schools in Ohio. ... The America East Conference is a college athletic conference whose members are located mainly in the northeastern United States. ... The Atlantic Sun Conference is a college athletic conference which operates primarily on the east coast of the United States. ... The Big Sky Conference (or BSC) is an intercollegiate college athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division I, with football competing in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS; formerly Division I-AA). ... The Big South Conference is a College Athletic Conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division I-AA in football and Division I in all other sports; it was founded in 1983. ... The Big West Conference (BWC) is an NCAA-affiliated Division I major college athletic conference that formerly sponsored Division I-A American football. ... The Colonial Athletic Association, also known as the CAA, is a NCAA Division I college athletic conference whose members are located in East Coast states from Massachusetts to Georgia. ... Conference USA, officially abbreviated C-USA, is a college athletic conference whose member institutions are located within the Southern United States. ... The Horizon League is a nine school, NCAA Division I college athletic conference, whose members are located in five of the Midwestern United States. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC, pronounced mack) is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... The Mid-American Conference (MAC) is a college athletic conference with a membership base that stretches from New York to Illinois. ... The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference which consists of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... “Mountain West” redirects here. ... The Northeast Conference (NEC) is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... The Ohio Valley Conference (OVC) is a college athletic conference which operates in the midwestern and southeastern United States. ... The Patriot League is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... The Southern Conference (or SoCon) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NCAAs Division I. SoCon football teams compete in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly known as I-AA). ... The Southland Conference is a college athletic conference which operates in the south central United States. ... The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black universities in the southern United States. ... The Sun Belt Conference is a college athletic conference that has been affiliated with the NCAAs Division I since 1976. ... The Summit League (or The Summit) is an NCAA Division I college athletic conference which operates primarily in the Midwestern United States, with outlying teams in Louisiana and Utah. ... The West Coast Conference is an NCAA collegiate athletic conference consisting of eight member schools in California, Oregon, and Washington. ... The Western Athletic Conference (commonly referred to as the WAC, pronounced wack) was formed on July 27, 1962, making it the sixth oldest of the 11 college athletic conferences currently participating in the NCAAs Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS; formerly Division I-A). ...

Whatever the definition, no mid-major team reached the Final Four from 1979, when Penn and a Larry Bird-led Indiana State both made it to the semifinals, each losing to Magic Johnson's Michigan State team (Penn in the semifinals, and Indiana State in the final), until 2006, when George Mason of the Colonial Athletic Association defeated two 2005 Final Four teams and 2006 regional top seed UConn on its way to the Final Four. Two other schools from mid-major conferences made the Final Four during that period of time—UNLV in 1977, 1987, 1990, and 1991, winning the title in 1990; and Massachusetts in 1996. However, UNLV and UMass were in a similar situation to Gonzaga and Memphis today, with both being widely recognized as "major" programs despite their conference affiliation. (In an interesting sidelight, John Calipari, who coached UMass in 1996, now coaches Memphis.) Despite the rarity of mid-major programs in the Final Four, the trend in recent years has been towards parity among all the schools in Division I, and practically every year a perennial major-conference power loses to an unheralded mid-major team in the tournament. The Atlantic 10 Conference (A10) is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in the eastern United States; it also has two member schools in Ohio. ... The Colonial Athletic Association, also known as the CAA, is a NCAA Division I college athletic conference whose members are located in East Coast states from Massachusetts to Georgia. ... Conference USA, officially abbreviated C-USA, is a college athletic conference whose member institutions are located within the Southern United States. ... The Horizon League is a nine school, NCAA Division I college athletic conference, whose members are located in five of the Midwestern United States. ... The Mid-American Conference (MAC) is a college athletic conference with a membership base that stretches from New York to Illinois. ... “Mountain West” redirects here. ... The Western Athletic Conference (commonly referred to as the WAC, pronounced wack) was formed on July 27, 1962, making it the sixth oldest of the 11 college athletic conferences currently participating in the NCAAs Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS; formerly Division I-A). ... The West Coast Conference is an NCAA collegiate athletic conference consisting of eight member schools in California, Oregon, and Washington. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ... NCAA Tournament Final Four 1979 Conference Regular Season Champions 1953, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007 // Name of School: University of Pennsylvania (Penn) Location (Zip): Philadelphia, Pa. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Earvin Johnson redirects here. ... The Michigan State Spartans mens basketball team represents Michigan State University (MSU) and competes in the Big 10 Conference of NCAA Division I. The team currently plays at the Breslin Student Events Center. ... Current George Mason athletic logo The George Mason Patriots are the athletic teams of George Mason University. ... The Connecticut Huskies, also known as the UConn Huskies, are the athletic teams of the University of Connecticut. ... The UNLV Runnin Rebels are a NCAA Division I mens basketball team who play at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... John Vincent Calipari (born February 10, 1959, in Moon Township (A suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States) is a former professional and current college basketball coach. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ...


Finally, a small number of teams (currently 11) compete in Division I basketball as so-called Independents, unaffiliated with any conference. Typically, these teams have just moved up to Division I from a lower division and compete independently while hoping eventually to secure a spot in a conference. Unlike in football, they are generally among the least-competitive teams in Division I college basketball.


Relationship to Professional Basketball

In past decades, the NBA only drafted players whose collegiate class had graduated. This was a mutually beneficial relationship for the NBA and colleges—the colleges held onto players who would otherwise go professional, and the NBA did not have to fund a minor league. For the most part, players benefited from the college education. As the college game became commercialized, though, it became increasingly difficult for "student athletes" to be students. Specifically, a growing number of poor, under-educated, highly talented teenage basketball players found the system exploitative—they brought in funds to schools where they learned little and played without income. The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ...


The American Basketball Association began to employ players whose college classes had not yet graduated. After a season of junior college, a season at the University of Detroit, and an Olympic gold medal, Spencer Haywood played the 1969-70 season with the ABA's Denver Rockets. He signed with the NBA's Seattle SuperSonics in 1970, before his college class graduation, defying NBA rules. Haywood pleaded that, as his family's sole wage earner, he should be allowed to earn a living in the NBA or else his family would face destitution. The ensuing legal battle went to the U.S. Supreme Court which ruled in 1971 that the NBA does not have the same antitrust exemption enjoyed by Major League Baseball. Thereafter, collegiate players demonstrating economic hardship were allowed early entry into the NBA Draft. The hardship requirement was eliminated in 1976. For the league that began in 1999, see American Basketball Association (2000-). The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a professional basketball league founded in 1967, and eventually merged, in part, with the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... For the Indian grade 11 and 12 schools, see Junior College A junior college is a two-year post-secondary school whose main purpose is to provide a method of obtaining academic, vocational and professional education. ... University of Detroit Mercy is the largest and most comprehensive Catholic University in Michigan. ... The United States, coached by Henry Iba of Oklahoma State University, went 9-0. ... Spencer Haywood (born April 22, 1949 in Silver City, Mississippi) is a former pro basketball player. ... The Denver Nuggets are a National Basketball Association team based in Denver, Colorado. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about anti-competitive business behavior. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... The NBA Draft is an annual North American event in which the National Basketball Associations (NBA) thirty teams (29 in the United States and one in Canada) can select players who wish to join the league. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1974, Moses Malone joined the Utah Stars of the ABA (now merged with the NBA) straight out of high school and went on to a Hall of Fame career. The past 30 years have seen a remarkable change in the college game. The best international players routinely skip college entirely, many American stars skip college (Kevin Garnett, Kobe Bryant, Tracy McGrady and LeBron James) or only play one year (Carmelo Anthony), and only a dozen or so college graduates are now among the 60 players selected in the annual NBA Draft. Fewer high schoolers will progress directly to the NBA without at least one year of college basketball beginning in 2006; citing maturity concerns after several incidents involving young players, the labor agreement between players and owners now specifies that players must turn 19 years of age during the calendar year of the draft to be eligible. Additionally, U.S. players must be at least one year removed from their high school graduation. Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Moses Eugene Malone (born March 23, 1955 in Petersburg, Virginia) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player who also played in the American Basketball Association (ABA), as well as on the NBAs Atlanta Hawks, Houston Rockets, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, San Antonio Spurs and Washington Bullets. ... The Utah Stars was an American Basketball Association (ABA) team based in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. // The Anaheim Amigos, based in Anaheim, California, began play in the fall of 1967, in the Anaheim Convention Center. ... For the league that began in 1999, see American Basketball Association (2000-). The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a professional basketball league founded in 1967, and eventually merged, in part, with the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Kevin Garnett (born May 19, 1976) is an American professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics. ... Kobe Bryant (born August 23, 1978) is an American All-Star shooting guard in the National Basketball Association who plays for the Los Angeles Lakers. ... Tracy Lamar McGrady, Jr. ... LeBron James (born December 30, 1984) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Carmelo Kyam Anthony (born May 29, 1984)) is an American professional basketball player at the small forward position for the Denver Nuggets of the National Basketball Association and the USA National Team. ... The NBA Draft is an annual North American event in which the National Basketball Associations (NBA) thirty teams (29 in the United States and one in Canada) can select players who wish to join the league. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The pervasiveness of college basketball throughout the nation, the large population of graduates from "major conference" universities, and the NCAA's marketing of "March Madness" (officially the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship), have kept the college game alive and well. Some commentators have argued that the higher turnover of players has increased the importance of good coaches. Many teams have been highly successful, for instance, by emphasizing personality in their recruiting efforts, with the goal of creating a cohesive group that, while lacking stars, plays together for all 4 years and thus develops a higher level of sophistication than less stable teams could achieve. Disambiguation: March Madness comes from the phrase Mad as a March Hare. In England, the phrase March Madness may refer to wasteful spending at the end of a budget year. ... // Final four redirects here. ...


Trivia

  • Only nine schools have reached each of the last nine Men's NCAA Division I Tournaments. No major conference has produced more than two of those teams and one of the teams does not belong to a major conference. They are Arizona, Duke, Florida, Gonzaga, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan State, Texas and Wisconsin. Along with those nine, an additional three schools have reached each of the last six tournaments. They are Illinois, Pittsburgh, and Southern Illinois.
  • The number 9 seed beats the number 8 seed more often than not.
  • Unlike NBA Basketball, NCAA Division I Basketball features two 20 minute halves.

Other Divisions

While less commercialized, Division I, Division II and Division III, both Women's and Men's, are highly successful college basketball organizations. Women's Division I is often televised, but to smaller audiences than Men's Division I. Generally, small colleges join Division II, while colleges of all sizes that choose not to offer athletic scholarships join Division III. D-II and D-III games, understandably, are almost never televised, although CBS televises the Championship Final of Division II, while CBS-owned CSTV televises the semifinals as well as the Division III Final. Many teams at these levels have rabid fan bases, though, and to those fans these games can be equally or more entertaining than big-time college basketball. Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with CSTV. (Discuss) CSTV Networks, Inc. ...


See also

The NCAA Womens Division I Championship is an annual basketball tournament for women. ... The NCAA Division II Mens Basketball Championship has been conducted since 1957. ... Divsion II women basketball champions for the NCAA 1982 Cal Poly Pomona 93-74 Tuskegee 1983 Virginia Union 73-60 Cal Poly Pomona 1984 Central Missouri State 80-73 Virginia Union 1985 Cal Poly Pomona 80-69 Central Missouri State 1986 Cal Poly Pomona 70-63 North Dakota State 1987... The NCAA holds an annual tournament to determine the Division III Mens Basketball Championship. ... NCAA Division III Womens Basketball Past Champions 1982 Elizabethtown 67-66 (OT) UNC Greensboro 1983 North Central 83-71 Elizabethtown 1984 Rust 51-49 Elizabethtown 1985 Scranton 68-59 New Rochelle 1986 Salem St. ...

See also

A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... College hockey most often refers to the American hockey competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. There are 3 national divisions each having many conferences, and supporting both mens and womens teams. ...

References

  • Getting Even : The Unknown Story of Bill Garrett and the Integration of College Basketball, by Tom Graham and Rachel Graham Cody (Atria 2006) ISBN 0-7434-7903-3
  • MARAVICH (The Definitive Biography of Pistol Pete Maravich) by Wayne Federman, Marshall Terrill and Jackie Maravich. (SportClassic Books 2007) ISBN 1-894963-52-0

MARAVICH (ISBN 1894963520) is a biography of Pete Maravich written by Wayne Federman and Marshall Terrill, in collaboration with Petes widow, Jackie Maravich. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
College basketball

  Results from FactBites:
 
college basketball: Information from Answers.com (2776 words)
College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA.
In 1904, 13 years after basketball was invented, and after being exposed to the game over the summer at Harvard University, Coach Edwin Henderson introduced basketball to a physical education class at Howard University in Washington, D. By 1910, basketball was one of the most popular sports among young African-Americans.
The pervasiveness of college basketball throughout the nation, the large population of graduates from "major conference" universities, and the NCAA's brilliant marketing of "March Madness" (officially the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship), have kept the college game alive and well.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m