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Encyclopedia > Colleen Moore
Colleen Moore

Birth name Kathleen Morrison
Born August 19, 1900(1900-08-19)
Port Huron, Michigan, U.S.
Died January 25, 1988 (aged 87)
Paso Robles, California, U.S.

Colleen Moore, born Kathleen Morrison (August 19, 1900January 25, 1988) was an American film actress, and one of the most fashionable stars of the silent film era. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (734x1024, 132 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Colleen Moore ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... A statue of Thomas Edison with the Blue Water Bridge in the background. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Paso Robles (full name: El Paso de Robles) is a city in San Luis Obispo County, California, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ...

Contents

Early life

Born in Port Huron, Michigan, Colleen was named as a WAMPAS Baby Star in 1922 in recognition of her growing popularity. Moore has credited her uncle, Walter Howey with setting up her introduction into films. Howey was an important newspaper editor in the publishing empire of William Randolph Hearst, and he was the inspiration for Walter Burns, the fictional Chicago newspaper editor in the play and the film The Front Page. A statue of Thomas Edison with the Blue Water Bridge in the background. ... The WAMPAS Baby Stars of 1932. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... The Front Page was a smash hit Broadway comedy written in 1928 by onetime Chicago, Illinois reporters Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur. ...


Career

Moore made her first credited film appearance in 1917 in "The Bad Boy," opposite Robert Herron, for Triangle Fine Arts, and for the next few years appeared in small, supporting roles [1] gradually attracting the attention of the public. There is a persistant rumor that she appeared in the 1916 film "Prince of Graustark" in tha part of "the maid." Those who have seen the film say the actress in that part bears a striking resemblence to Colleen. However, the part is uncredited, and while Colleen spend her summers in Chicago where the film was made, there is no definite proof yet that she played the part. “The Bad Boy” was released on Feburary 18th. It featured Robert Harron, Richard Cummings, Josephine Crowell, and Mildred Harris (who would later become Charles Chaplin’s first wife). Two months later it was followed by “An Old Fashioned Young Man,” again with Robert Harron. Colleen’s third film was “Hands up!” filmed in part in the vicinity of the Seven Oaks (a popular location for productions that required dramatic vistas). This was her first true western. The film’s scenario was written by Wilfred Lucas from a story by Al Jennings, the famous outlaw who had been freed from jail by presidential pardon by Teddy Roosevelt in 1907. Monte Blue was in the cast and noticed Colleen could not mount her horse, though horseback riding was required for the part (during casting for the part she neglected to mention she did not know how to ride.) Monte gave her a quick lesson essentially consisting of how to mount the horse and how to hold on for deal life. He also suggested she go out and get lessons. In a climatic scene she was locked in a closet and was able to scream her head off for the camera. The May 3rd, 1917 Chicago Daily Tribune’s said: “Colleen Moore contributes some remarkable bits of acting. She is very sweet as she goes trustingly to her bandit hero, and, O, so pitiful, when finally realizing the character of the man, she goes into an hysteria of terror, and, shrieking ‘Daddy, Daddy, Daddy!’ beats futilely on a bolted door, a panic stricken little human animal, who had not know before that there was aught but kindness in the world.” About the time her first six month contract was extended an additional six months, she requested and received a five weeks release to do a film for Universal Bluebird, released under the name "The Savage." This was her fourth film, and she was only needed for two weeks. Upon her return to the Fine Arts lot, she spent several weeks trying to get her pay for the three weeks she had been again been available for work for Triangle (finally getting her pay in December of that year). Unfortunately for her, the Triangle Company went bust, and while her contract was honored, she found herself scrambling to find her next job. With a reel of her performance in "Hands Up!" under her arm. Colin Campbell arranged for her to get a contract for her with Selig Polyscope. She was very likely at work on "A Hoosier Romance" before "The Savage" was released in November. After "A Hoosier Romance," she went to work on "Little Orphant Annie." Both films were based upon poems by James Whitcomb Riley, and both proved to be very popular. It was her first real taste of popularity. It had always been her goal to be a star. Her first major success was the 1923 film Flaming Youth opposite actor Milton Sills. Moore's vivacious flapper caused a sensation and made her one of the most talked about actresses of her day. Moore and Louise Brooks were seen as the people who epitomized the young adult society of their day, they also shared the same hairstyle. Moore's career grew over the next few years. As she continued to play similar characters in successful films such as Flirting With Love and The Perfect Flapper, Moore's bobbed hairstyle was widely copied throughout the world. By the late 1920s she had progressed to more important roles in films such as So Big and was also well received in light comedies such as Irene. Fortunately for Colleen, the cameras didn't pick up that she had one brown eye and one blue one. Original lineup of Flaming Youth, from a promotional photograph. ... Milton Sills Milton Sills (January 12, 1882 - September 15, 1930) was a highly successful American stage and film actor of the early twentieth century. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Louise Brooks (14 November 1906 – 8 August 1985) was an American dancer, showgirl, and silent film actress. ... The 1920s is a decade that is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... So Big! is a 1932 film directed by William A. Wellman and starring Barbara Stanwyck, George Brent, and Bette Davis. ... Irene is a musical with a book by James Montgomery, lyrics by Joseph McCarthy, and music by Harry Tierney. ...


Talkies

With the advent of talking pictures in 1929, Moore took a hiatus from acting. During this interim, Moore was briefly married to a prominent New York-based stockbroker, Albert Parker Scott, one of her four husbands. She and Scott lived at that time in a lavish home in Bel Air, where they hosted parties for and were supporters of the U.S. Olympic team, especially the yachting team, during the 1932 Summer Olympics held in Los Angeles. In 1933, Moore, by then divorced, returned to work in Hollywood. She appeared in three films. None of these were successful, and Moore retired. She later married the widower Homer Hargrave and raised his children (she never had children of her own) from a previous marriage, with whom she maintained a life-long close relationship. Throughout her life she also maintained close friendships with other colleagues from the silent film era, such as King Vidor and Mary Pickford. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Yachting is a physical activity involving boats. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... King Vidor King Wallis Vidor (February 8, 1894 – November 1, 1982) was an American film director. ... Mary Pickford (April 8, 1892 – May 29, 1979) was an Oscar-winning Canadian motion picture star and co-founder of United Artists in 1919. ...


Colleen Moore Dollhouse

In 1928, inspired by her father and with help from her former set designer, Horace Jackson, Moore constructed an 8-foot tall miniature "fairy castle" which toured the United States. The interior of "The Colleen Moore Dollhouse," designed by Harold Grieve, is a classic example of the Art Deco Style, complete with miniature bear skin rugs and streamlined furniture and art. Moore's dollhouse has been a featured exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Illinois since the early 1950s, where, according to the museum it is seen by 1.5 million people each year. Moore continued working on it, and contributing artifacts to it, until her death. Harold Grieve (February 1, 1901 – November 3, 1993) was an motion picture art director and interior designer. ... Asheville City Hall. ... Living Room of Dollhouse. ... A view from the lagoon behind the Museum of Science and Industry, the only in-place surviving building from the 1893 World Columbian Exposition and a National Historic Landmark. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ...


Later life and career

In the 1960s she formed a television production company with King Vidor with whom she had worked in the 1920s. She also published two books in the late 1960s, her autobiography Silent Star: Colleen Moore Talks About Her Hollywood (1968) and How Women Can Make Money in the Stock Market (1969), a subject she had proved herself well-qualified to discuss. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... King Vidor King Wallis Vidor (February 8, 1894 – November 1, 1982) was an American film director. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ...


At the height of her fame, Moore was earning $12,500 per week. She was an astute investor, and through her investments remained wealthy for the rest of her life. In her later years she would frequently attend film festivals, and was a popular interview subject always willing to discuss her Hollywood career. She was a participant in the 1980 documentary series Hollywood, providing her recollections of Hollywood's silent film era. Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Hollywood, also known as Hollywood: A Celebration of the American Silent Film was a documentary series produced in 1980 which discussed the establishment and development of the Hollywood studios and its impact on 1920s culture. ...


Moore died from cancer in Paso Robles, California, aged 87. Her contribution to the motion picture industry has been recognized with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1551 Vine Street. Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... Paso Robles (full name: El Paso de Robles) is a city in San Luis Obispo County, California, United States. ... Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ...


Quote

F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote of her: "I was the spark that lit up Flaming Youth, Colleen Moore was the torch. What little things we are to have caused all that trouble." Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ...


Further reading

  • Jeanine Basinger (1999), chapter on Moore in Silent Stars, (ISBN 0-8195-6451-6).

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Colleen Moore - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (690 words)
Colleen Moore, born Kathleen Morrison (August 19, 1900 – January 25, 1988) was an American film actress, and one of the most fashionable stars of the silent film era.
Moore and Louise Brooks were seen as the people who epitomized the young adult society of their day, and Moore's career grew over the next few years.
Moore's dollhouse has been a featured exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Illinois since the early 1950s, where, according to the museum it is seen by 1.5 million people each year.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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