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Encyclopedia > Collective number

In linguistics, collective number is a number referring to a set of things. Languages that have this feature can use it to get a phrase like 'flock of sheep' by using 'sheep' in collective number.


Some languages have collectives but no grammatical plural. For example, Chinese, Korean do not have plurals. However, groups of people can be referred to, either by context or periphrastically (i.e., with additional words or phrases).


An example from Japanese:

  • Tanaka-san; Tanaka-san-tachi
"Mr. Tanaka"; "Mr. Tanaka and his group



  Results from FactBites:
 
BIBB / Current trends in collective agreements aimed at fostering training (2968 words)
The primary aims of collective agreements on measures to foster training are to maintain or increase the number of in-company training places and to either ensure that individuals who complete in-company training are subsequently hired by the company providing their training or to increase the number of trainees being hired.
Looking at how collective agreements on measures to foster training have developed over the years, it is striking that the number of agreements has grown enormously while the overall number of employed persons in the sectors covered by these agreements has remained almost unchanged.
In some collective bargaining sectors, the requirement to hire trainees upon completion of their training was made contingent upon the individual's suitability and, in some cases, on their willingness to move or their level of flexibility.
Collective number - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (105 words)
In linguistics, collective number is a number referring to a set of things.
Some languages have collectives but no grammatical plural.
For example, Chinese, Japanese (except in a small number of cases), and Korean do not have plurals.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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