FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Cojones" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Cojones

Cojones IPA: [ko'xones] is a vulgar Spanish word for testicles, corresponding to "balls" or "bollocks". For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... The testicles, or testes (singular testis), are the male generative glands in animals. ... Bollocks is a word meaning testicles in British English and in Hiberno-English. ...

Contents

Usage in English

The word has entered popular use in the United States as a slang term meaning to have a brave attitude. It is used in a way similar to chutzpah. Anglicized/Americanized pronunciations include IPA: [kə'hoʊneɪz] or the less accurate /kə'hu:nəz/. A very frequent misspelling (sometimes done deliberately as a euphemism) is cajones, which actually means "drawers" (the piece of furniture) or "wooden box drums" (see cajon) in Spanish. Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... Chutzpah is the quality of audacity, for good or for bad. ... For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... A euphemism is an expression intended by the speaker to be less offensive, disturbing, or troubling to the listener than the word or phrase it replaces, or in the case of doublespeak to make it less troublesome for the speaker. ... A caj n (Spanish for crate, drawer, or box, pronounced ka. ...


Notable recent usage

The word was famously used in 1996 by Madeleine Albright, then serving as the USA's ambassador to the United Nations, in the aftermath of the downing of a Hermanos al Rescate light civilian aircraft by Cuban airforce MiG 29s on 24 February 1996. Following the release of a transcript of radio traffic between the fighter pilots in which one exclaimed, ¡Le partimos los cojones! ("We busted his balls!"), Albright offered the following comment: "Frankly, this is not cojones. This is cowardice." Albright later described the vulgarism as "the only Spanish word I know". 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born Marie Jana Korbelová on May 15, 1937) served as the 64th United States Secretary of State. ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Hermanos al Rescate, or Brothers to the Rescue is an anti-Castro group located in the United States. ... The Mikoyan MiG-29 (NATO reporting name Fulcrum) is a Russian fighter aircraft used in the air superiority role. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


In April 2004 when Bob Woodward reported in his book Plan of Attack—an account of the build-up to the 2003 Iraq War—that U.S. President George W. Bush had remarked to Alastair Campbell, then British Prime Minister Tony Blair's official spokesman, that "Your man has got cojones". Bush was referring to Blair's continuing support for the invasion of Iraq despite mounting opposition from his domestic political party and Britons at large. The meeting at Camp David in September 2002 at which Blair made his commitment on invasion to Bush, and Bush made his comment to Campbell, was later repeatedly referred to by Bush as "the cojones meeting".[citation needed] Bob Woodward Robert Upshur Bob Woodward (born March 26, 1943) is assistant managing editor of The Washington Post. ... Plan of Attack (ISBN 074325547X) is a 2004 book by Washington Post investigative reporter Bob Woodward billed as a behind-the-scenes account of how and why President Bush decided to go to war against Iraq [1] The books chief contention, which provides the rationale for its title, is... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq without the explicit backing of the United... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Alastair Campbell Alastair John Campbell (born May 25, 1957) was the Director of Communications and Strategy for 10 Downing Street. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in North East England. ... Main Lodge at Camp David during Nixon administration, February 9, 1971. ...


Use in Spanish and etymology

Cojón IPA: [ko'xon] (plural: cojones) along with huevos (literally "eggs") is one of the most common ways of referring to the testicles in Spanish. It contains the augmentative suffix -ón (which implies largeness), and derives from Vulgar Latin coleonem, the accusative form of coleo "testicle", an augmentative form of cōleus (variants: cūleus and culleus), which meant "bag", particularly "leather bag for holding liquids". For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... Vulgar Latin, as in this political engraving at Pompeii, was the language of the ordinary people of the Roman Empire, distinct from the Classical Latin of literature. ... The term accusative may be used in the following contexts: A form of morphosyntactic alignment, as found in nominative-accusative languages. ...


The lej or lij pronunciation shift is a common one, as shown by other Latin and Spanish examples such as foliahoja, meaning "leaf", which is a cognate with the English word "foliage". This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


It can be used as in English to imply virility or courage: tener cojones = "to have balls".


The same word exists in Catalan as colló, very commonly used in the plural (collons) as an exclamation. Other cognates include the French couilles, Italian coglioni, Portuguese colhões, Romanian coaie. Finnish language has the expression on munaa (to have eggs), which is the same as tener huevos. Catalan in Europe Catalan IPA: (català ) is a Romance language, the official language of Andorra and co-official in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Valencia (under the name Valencian) and Catalonia. ... Finnish ( ) is the language spoken by the majority of the population in Finland (92%[2] as mother tongue) and by ethnic Finns outside Finland. ...


References

Listen to this article · (info)
Spoken Wikipedia
This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2005-05-27, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. (Audio help)
More spoken articles
  • Reports on Bush's description of Blair
  • Transcript of a CNN interview with Albright that discusses the cojones quote
  • Collins Gem Latin Dictionary, ISBN 0-00-458644-1
  • Diccionario Esencial Santillana de la Lengua Española, ISBN 84-294-3415-1
  • Rincón de Chistes - humorous page in Spanish describing various slang uses of the term (in Spanish)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cojones - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (559 words)
Cojones IPA: [ko'xones] is a vulgar Spanish word for testicles, corresponding to "balls" or "bollocks".
Bush was referring to Blair's continuing support for the invasion of Iraq despite mounting opposition from his domestic political party and Britons at large.
Cojón IPA: [ko'xon] (plural: cojones) along with huevos (literally "eggs") is one of the most common ways of referring to the testicles in Spanish.
cojones - Wiktionary (137 words)
Cojones is referred to the items that a male possesses to enable him to breed.
Although a Spanish word, the word is often used in the United States as a term to referring to the testes.
The context of the term is meant to descibe the level of machismo that a person has in making a decision, taking an action, etc. Example: it is synonomous with, "He has the balls to do the job".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m