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Encyclopedia > Coffin
A replica of the coffin used for Abraham Lincoln, on display at the Museum of Funeral Customs.
A replica of the coffin used for Abraham Lincoln, on display at the Museum of Funeral Customs.

A coffin (in North American English, also known as a casket) is a funerary box used in the display and containment of deceased remains — either for burial or cremation. Coffin is a surname, and may refer to: Bill Coffin, writer of novels and role-playing games Charles Edward Coffin, politician from U.S. state of Maryland Clifford Coffin, English recipient of the Victoria Cross David Coffin, folk musician Edmund Coffin, saddlemaker and equestrian Frank M. Coffin, politician and jurist... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x800, 764 KB) Lincolns coffin, replica, Museum of Funeral Customs, Springfield, Illinois, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x800, 764 KB) Lincolns coffin, replica, Museum of Funeral Customs, Springfield, Illinois, 2006. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Museum of Funeral Customs Early embalming fluid The Museum of Funeral Customs is located at 144 Monument Ave. ... North American English is a collective term used for the varieties of the English language that are spoken in the United States and Canada. ... This article is about the receptacle or vessel called a box. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The crematorium at Haycombe Cemetery, Bath, England. ...


The word comes ultimately from Greek kophinos, a basket. In English, the word wasn't used in a funeral sense until the 1500s.[citation needed] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The decade of years from 1500 to 1509, inclusive. ...

Anthropoid coffin, 14th-13th centuries BCE

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2078 × 3117 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2078 × 3117 pixel, file size: 4. ... Families Cebidae Aotidae Pitheciidae Atelidae Cercopithecidae Hylobatidae Hominidae The simians (infraorder Simiiformes) are the higher primates very common to most people: the monkeys and the apes, including humans. ...

Practices

Any box used to bury the dead in is a coffin. Use of the word "casket" in this sense began as a euphemism introduced by the undertaker's trade in North America; a "casket" was originally a box for jewellery.[1] Some Americans[attribution needed] draw a distinction between "coffins" and "caskets"; for these people, a coffin is a tapered hexagonal or octagonal (also considered to be anthropodial in shape) box used for a burial. A rectangular burial box with a split lid used for viewing the deceased is called a "casket" as seen in the picture above. Euphemism is the substitution of an agreeable or inoffensive expression for one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant to the listener; or in the case of doublespeak, to make it less troublesome for the speaker. ... This article is about the vocation of a mortician and the death metal band; for the World Wrestling Entertainment superstar, see The Undertaker. ... For other uses, see Hexagon (disambiguation). ... Octagonal was a champion New Zealand bred thoroughbred racehorse, affectionately called the big O. In 1995 Octagonal was crowned the Champion Australian Two Year Old. ... In geometry, a rectangle is defined as a quadrilateral where all four of its angles are right angles. ...


Receptacles for cremated human ashes (sometimes called cremains) are called urns. Cremation is the practice of disposing of a corpse by burning. ... Maya funerary urn For the computing term, see URN. An urn is a vase, ordinarily covered and without handles that usually has a narrowed neck above a footed pedestal. ...


A coffin may be buried in the ground directly, placed in a burial vault or cremated. The above ground burial is in a mausoleum. Often it is a large cement building at a cemetery, housing hundreds of bodies, or a small personal crypt. A burial vault is a sturdy box designed to protect the coffin inside of it. ...


Some countries practice one form almost exclusively;[citation needed] in others, it depends on the individual cemetery. The handles and other ornaments (such as doves, stipple crosses, crucifix, masonic symbols etc.) that go on the outside of a coffin are called fittings (sometimes called 'coffin furniture', not to be confused with furniture that is coffin shaped) while organising the inside of the coffin with drapery of some kind is known as "trimming the coffin". Castle Ashby Graveyard Northamptonshire A cemetery is a place in which dead bodies and cremated remains are buried. ...

The glass-covered coffin of the Haraldskær Woman.

Cultures that practice burial have widely different styles of coffin. In some varieties of orthodox Judaism[specify], the coffin must be plain, made of wood, and contain no metal parts nor adornments. These coffins use wooden pegs instead of nails. In China and Japan, coffins made from the scented, decay-resistant wood of cypress, sugi, thuja and incense-cedar are in high demand.[citation needed] In Africa, elaborate coffins are built in the shapes of various mundane objects, like automobiles or aeroplanes.[citation needed] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1776 × 2688 pixel, file size: 431 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) i took this photo and release all rights photo date 7/06 subject: haraldskaer woman, st nicolas church, velje, denmark Permission is granted to copy... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1776 × 2688 pixel, file size: 431 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) i took this photo and release all rights photo date 7/06 subject: haraldskaer woman, st nicolas church, velje, denmark Permission is granted to copy... Haraldskær Woman in glass covered coffin, Velje, Denmark The Haraldskær Woman (or Haraldskaer Woman) is a well-preserved Iron Age bog body naturally preserved in a bog in Jutland, Denmark. ... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ... Genera Actinostrobus Athrotaxis Austrocedrus Callitris - Cypress-pine Callitropsis - Cypress * (Cupressus) Calocedrus - Incense-cedar Chamaecyparis - Cypress Cryptomeria - Sugi Cunninghamia - Cunninghamia Cupressus - Cypress Diselma - Diselma Fitzroya - Alerce Fokienia - Fujian Cypress Glyptostrobus - Chinese Swamp Cypress Juniperus - Juniper Libocedrus Metasequoia - Dawn Redwood Microbiota - Microbiota Neocallitropsis Papuacedrus * (Libocedrus) Pilgerodendron * (Libocedrus) Platycladus - Chinese Arborvitae Sequoia - Coast... Binomial name Cryptomeria japonica (L. f. ... Species Thuja koraiensis Thuja occidentalis Thuja plicata Thuja standishii Thuja sutchuenensis Thuja (pronounced Thuya) is a genus of coniferous trees in the Cupressaceae (cypress family). ... Species Calocedrus decurrens Conservation status: Secure Calocedrus formosana Conservation status: Vulnerable Calocedrus macrolepis Conservation status: Vulnerable The Incense-cedars, Calocedrus, are a genus of two to three species of coniferous trees in the cypress family Cupressaceae. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


Sometimes coffins are constructed to display the dead body, as in the case of the glass-covered coffin of Haraldskær Woman on display in the Church of Saint Nicolai in Vejle, Denmark. Haraldskær Woman in glass covered coffin, Velje, Denmark The Haraldskær Woman (or Haraldskaer Woman) is a well-preserved Iron Age bog body naturally preserved in a bog in Jutland, Denmark. ... Vejle as seen from Vejle Fjord Bridge Vejle – in IPA: – town in Denmark and site of the council of both Vejle municipality (kommune) and Vejle County (amt), located in southeast of Jutland peninsula. ...


When a coffin or casket is used to transport a deceased person, it can also be called a pall, a term that also refers to the cloth used to cover the coffin. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A pall is a casket covering. ...


Modern coffins

Today manufacturers offer features that they[attribution needed] claim will protect the body. For example, some may offer a protective casket that uses a gasket to seal the casket shut after the coffin is closed for the final time. Many manufacturers offer a warranty on the structural integrity of the coffin. However, no coffin will preserve the body, regardless of whether it is a wooden or metal coffin, a sealed casket, or if the deceased was embalmed beforehand. In some cases, a sealed coffin may actually speed up rather than slow down the process of decomposition. An airtight coffin, for example, fosters decomposition by anaerobic bacteria, which results in a putrefied liquification of the body, and all putrefied tissue remains inside the container, only to be exposed in the event of an exhumation. A container that allows air molecules to pass in and out, such as a simple wooden box, allows for aerobic decomposition that results in much less noxious odor and clean skeletonization. Some seals and gaskets 1. ... Embalming, in most modern cultures, is a process used to temporarily preserve a human cadaver to forestall decomposition and make it suitable for display at a funeral. ... An anaerobic organism or anaerobe is any organism that does not require oxygen. ... Putrefaction is the decomposition of proteins, especially by anaerobic microorganisms. ... In physics, to liquefy or liquify means to turn something into the liquid state. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Coffins are made of many materials, including steel, various types of wood, and other materials such as fiberglass. There is now emerging interest in eco-friendly coffins made of purely natural materials such as bamboo.[2]


Coffins are sometimes personalized to offer college insignia or different head panels to better reflect the deceased's life choices.


Cremation coffins

With the resurgence of cremation in the Western world, manufacturers have begun providing options for those who choose cremation. For a direct cremation a cardboard box is normally used. Those who wish to have a funeral visitation (sometimes called a viewing) or traditional funeral service will use a coffin of some sort. The term Western world, the West or the Occident (Latin occidens -sunset, -west, as distinct from the Orient) [1] can have multiple meanings dependent on its context (e. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In funeral service a viewing (called a visitation in the United States and Canada) is the time that the family and friends come to see the deceased after they have been prepared by a funeral home. ...


Some choose to use a coffin made of wood or other materials like particle board. Others will rent a regular casket for the duration of the services. These caskets have a removable bed and liner which is replaced after each use. There are also rental caskets with an outer shell that looks like a traditional coffin and a cardboard box that fits inside the shell. At the end of the services the inner box is removed and the deceased is cremated inside this box.


Casket industry

A Chinese lacquer coffin decorated with birds and dragons, from the State of Chu, 4th century BC.

In the United States, a number of companies produce caskets. Some manufacturers do not sell directly to the public, and only work with licensed funeral homes. In that case, the funeral home usually sells the casket to a family for a deceased person as part of the funeral services offered, and in that case the price of the casket is included in the total bill for services rendered. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 370 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1200 pixel, file size: 338 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 370 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1200 pixel, file size: 338 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... In a general sense, lacquer is a clear or coloured coating, that dries by solvent evaporation only and that produces a hard, durable finish that can be polished to a very high gloss, and gives the illusion of depth. ... State of Chu (small seal script, 220 BC) Chu (楚), originally known as Jing (荆) and then Jingchu (荆楚), was an independent state that existed during Chinas Spring and Autumn period and, subsequently, the Warring States period. ...


Often funeral homes will have a small showroom to present families with the available caskets that could be used for a deceased family member. In many modern funeral homes the showroom will consist of sample pieces that show the end pieces of each type of coffin that can be used. They also include samples of the lining and other materials. This allows funeral homes to showcase a larger number of coffin styles without the need for a larger showroom. Examples of such showrooms can be seen on the A&E show Family Plots, and the HBO drama Six Feet Under. Biography is one of A&Es longest-running and most popular programs. ... Family Plots is a reality television show that follows the ongoing events and the sometimes eccentric employees that work at the family-run Poway Bernardo Mortuary in Poway, California. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... Six Feet Under is a critically acclaimed American television drama created by Alan Ball that was originally broadcast from 2001 to 2005. ...


One manufacturer of caskets is the New Melleray Abbey of rural Peosta, Iowa. The monks of this abbey build wooden caskets and urns for their own use, as well as for sale to the general public. The caskets are popularly known as Trappist Caskets. New Melleray Abbey, Peosta, Iowa. ... Peosta is a city located in Dubuque County, Iowa. ...


Under a U.S. federal law, 16 CFR Part 453 (known as the Funeral Rule), if a family provides a casket they purchased elsewhere, the establishment is required to accept the casket and use it in the services. If the casket is delivered direct to the funeral home from the manufacturer or store, they are required to accept delivery of the casket. The funeral home may not add any extra charges or fees to the overall bill if a family decides to purchase a casket elsewhere.


Unusual coffins

Kiss Coffin

Custom coffins are occasionally created and some companies also make set ranges with non-traditional designs. These include painting of peaceful tropical scenes, sea-shells, sunsets and cherubs. Some manufacturers have designed them to look like gym carry bags, guitar cases, cigar humidors, and even yellow dumpster bins. Others coffins are left deliberately blank so that friends and family can inscribe final wishes and thoughts upon it to the deceased. The rock band Kiss has made a coffin called the Kiss Kasket for their most diehard fans; Dimebag Darrell, guitarist of both Pantera and Damageplan, was buried in one. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (841x286, 54 KB) Summary Promotional image of KISS Kasket[1] distributed with press release[2] from Signatures Network, which represents the rock band KISS in retail licensing. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (841x286, 54 KB) Summary Promotional image of KISS Kasket[1] distributed with press release[2] from Signatures Network, which represents the rock band KISS in retail licensing. ... “Hard Rock” redirects here. ... Kiss is an American rock band formed in New York City in 1973. ... The Kiss Kasket. ... “Dimebag” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pantera (disambiguation). ... Damageplan was a heavy metal band, showcasing the Groove Metal sound that was demonstrated by Vinnie Paul and Dimebag Darrell Abbott while playing in Pantera, most notably on the Vulgar Display of Power album. ...


In Taiwan, coffins made of crushed oyster shells were used in the 18th and 19th centuries. For other uses, see Oyster (disambiguation). ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Cenotaph, London A ceremony at the Cenotaph, London, on Sunday 12th June 2005, remembering Irish war dead Memorial Cenotaph, Hiroshima, Japan A cenotaph is a tomb or a monument erected in honor of a person or group of persons whose remains are elsewhere. ... Ossuary in Hallstatt (see the article for details). ... Stone sarcophagus of Pharaoh Merenptah Detail of a stone sarcophagus in the Istanbul Archeological Museum showing a hunting scene Anthropoid sarcophagus discovered at Cádiz A sarcophagus is a stone container for a coffin or body. ... For the New York prison see The Tombs. ... Hanging coffins are coffins which have been placed on cliffs. ... Coffin plates are decorative adornments attached to a coffin that can contain various inscriptions like the name and death date of the deceased or a simple terms of endearment. ... A bier from Grendon church A bier is a flat frame, traditionally wooden but sometimes made of other materials, used to carry a corpse for burial in a funeral procession. ...

References

  1. ^ casket, coffin (nn.) from the Columbia Guide to Standard American English via Bartleby.com
  2. ^ Bamboo Coffins "Coffin-maker resurrects tradition", from BBC Business News, published 2001-12-28

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