FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Coenzyme" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Coenzyme
Coenzyme A
Coenzyme A

Coenzymes are small organic non-protein molecules that carry chemical groups between enzymes. Many coenzymes are phosphorylated water-soluble vitamins. However, nonvitamins may also be coenzymes, such as ATP, the biochemical carrier of phosphate groups, or coenzyme A the coenzyme that carries acyl groups. Coenzyme Q is unusual as it carries electrons between enzymes by diffusing within cell membranes, as this coenzyme is not water soluble. The term coenzymes is commonly used loosely, and coenzymes can also be defined as organic, non-protein cofactors.[1] Coenzymes are also sometimes referred to as cosubstrates, but this usage is unusual. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1532x1366, 26 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1532x1366, 26 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Benzene is the simplest of the arenes, a family of organic compounds An organic compound is any member of a large class of chemical compounds whose molecules contain carbon and hydrogen; therefore, carbides, carbonates, carbon oxides and elementary carbon are not organic (see below for more on the definition controversy... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... In chemistry, a molecule is an aggregate of two or more atoms in a definite arrangement held together by chemical bonds [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]. Chemical substances are not infinitely divisible into smaller fractions of the same substance: a molecule is generally considered the smallest particle of a pure... Ribbon diagram of the enzyme TIM, surrounded by the space-filling model of the protein. ... A phosphorylated serine residue Phosphorylation is the addition of a phosphate (PO4) group to a protein or a small molecule or the introduction of a phosphate group into an organic molecule. ... Impact of a drop of water. ... Retinol (Vitamin A) For the record label, see Vitamin Records Vitamins are nutrients required in very small amounts for essential metabolic reactions in the body. ... Adenosine 5-triphosphate (ATP) is a multifunctional nucleotide that is most important as a molecular currency of intracellular energy transfer. ... Above is a ball-and-stick model of the inorganic hydrogenphosphate anion (HPO42−). Colour coding: P (orange); O (red); H (white). ... Acetyl Coenzyme A Acetyl-CoA Coenzyme A (CoA, CoASH, or HSCoA) is a coenzyme, notable for its role in the synthesis and oxidization of fatty acids, and the oxidation of pyruvate in the citric acid cycle. ... In chemistry, the terms acyl or acyl group refer to a functional group obtained from an acid by removal of a hydroxyl group. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... A cofactor is any substance that needs to be present in addition to an enzyme to catalyze a certain reaction. ...


Coenzymes are consumed in the reactions in which they are substrates, for example: the coenzyme NADH is converted to NAD+ by oxidoreductases. Coenzymes are however regenerated and their concentration maintained at a steady level in the cell.


A special subset of coenzymes are prosthetic groups. These have more in common with cofactors since they are tightly bound to enzymes and are not released as part of the reaction. Prosthetic groups include molybdopterin, lipoamide and biotin. A coenzyme is an organic non-protein molecule that is a functional part of an enzyme. ... A cofactor is any substance that needs to be present in addition to an enzyme to catalyze a certain reaction. ... Molybdopterins are a class of biochemical cofactors that are used in many different enzymes. ... Lipoamide is a trivial name for 6,8-dithiooctanoic amide. ... Vitamin H redirects here. ...


See also

Acetyl Coenzyme A Acetyl-CoA Coenzyme A (CoA, CoASH, or HSCoA) is a coenzyme, notable for its role in the synthesis and oxidization of fatty acids, and the oxidation of pyruvate in the citric acid cycle. ... Adenosine 5-triphosphate (ATP) is a multifunctional nucleotide that is most important as a molecular currency of intracellular energy transfer. ... This coenzyme transfers glycosyl-groups from glucose. ... Cyanocobalamin is a vitamin commonly known as vitamin B12 (or B12 for short). ... Coenzyme Q (CoQ), also known as ubiquinone or ubiquinol, is a biologically active quinone with an isoprenoid side chain, related in structure to vitamin K and vitamin E. // History Coenzyme Q was first discovered in 1957 by professor F. L. Crane and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin Enzyme Institute. ... Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) are two important cofactors found in cells. ... Molybdopterins are a class of biochemical cofactors that are used in many different enzymes. ... This article deals with the molecular aspects of ascorbic acid. ... Vitamin C is a nutrient required in very small amounts to allow a range of essential metabolic reactions in the body. ... A cofactor is any substance that needs to be present in addition to an enzyme to catalyze a certain reaction. ... Neuraminidase ribbon diagram An enzyme (in Greek en = in and zyme = blend) is a protein, or protein complex, that catalyzes a chemical reaction and also controls the 3D orientation of the catalyzed substrates. ...

References

  1. ^ Lehninger

External links

  • Links to external chemical sources

  Results from FactBites:
 
Coenzyme Q10 Information - CoQ10 Supplement - Ubiquinone (736 words)
Coenzyme Q10 was first discovered in 1957 at the Enzyme Institute of the University of Wisconsin when Dr. Frederick Crane isolated the compound from a beef heart.
Chemically, Coenzyme Q10 is actually a two-part compound that is composed of (1) a long, fat-soluble isoprenoid tail that anchors the molecule in the inner membrane of the mitochondria and (2) a quinone that is capable of accepting and transferring electrons through a portion of the respiratory chain.
Coenzyme Q10 is recognized as a crucial component in the process in the mitochondria that converts the energy in carbohydrates and fatty acids into the fuel necessary to drive cellular machinery and synthesis in the body.2 In addition to the important process which provides energy, CoQ10 also stabilizes cell membranes and acts as an antioxidant.
Coenzyme Q - CoenzymeQ (539 words)
Coenzyme Q (CoQ), also known as ubiquinone or ubiquinol, is a biologically active quinone with an isoprenoid side chain, related in structure to vitamin K and vitamin E. History
Coenzyme Q was first discovered in 1957 by professor F. Crane and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin Enzyme Institute.
Supplementation of Coenzyme Q10 has been found to have a beneficial effect on the condition of some sufferers of migraines, and is a common component of the "mito cocktail" used to treat mitochondrial disorders and other metabolic disorders.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m