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Encyclopedia > Cocoon (silk)
The tough brown cocoon of an Emperor Gum Moth.
The tough brown cocoon of an Emperor Gum Moth.
An Emperor Gum Moth caterpillar spinning its cocoon.
An Emperor Gum Moth caterpillar spinning its cocoon.

A cocoon is a casing spun of silk by caterpillars and certain other insect larvae. Butterfly larvae do not spin a cocoon; their pupal form is called a chrysalis. Some caterpillars attach small twigs, fecal pellets or maybe pieces of vegetation to the outside of their cocoon in an attempt to disguise it from predators. Others spin their cocoon in a concealed location - on the underside of a leaf, in a crevice, or down near the base of a treetrunk. Moths pupae spin cocoons. Download high resolution version (800x909, 220 KB)The Emperor Gum Moth in its cocoon Taken by fir0002 File links The following pages link to this file: Cocoon (silk) Emperor Gum Moth Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (800x909, 220 KB)The Emperor Gum Moth in its cocoon Taken by fir0002 File links The following pages link to this file: Cocoon (silk) Emperor Gum Moth Categories: GFDL images ... The Emperor Gum Moth (Opodiphthera eucalypti) is a species native to Australia, and can be easily found in all the states except for Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania. ... Download high resolution version (1280x841, 238 KB)The Emperor Gum Moth caterpillar spinning its silken cocoon on a eucalyptus twig Taken by fir0002 File links The following pages link to this file: Cocoon (silk) Emperor Gum Moth Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (1280x841, 238 KB)The Emperor Gum Moth caterpillar spinning its silken cocoon on a eucalyptus twig Taken by fir0002 File links The following pages link to this file: Cocoon (silk) Emperor Gum Moth Categories: GFDL images ... Silk weaver Silk is a natural protein fiber that can be woven into textiles. ... The striking caterpillar of the Emperor Gum Moth This article is about insect larva. ... A larva (Latin; plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). ... Families Superfamily Hesperioidea: Hesperiidae Superfamily Papilionoidea: Papilionidae Pieridae Nymphalidae Lycaenidae Riodinidae A butterfly is an insect of the Order Lepidoptera, and belongs to one of the superfamilies Hesperioidea (the skippers) or Papilionoidea (all other butterflies). ... Butterfly Chrysalis Monarch Butterfly Chrysalis For the record label created in 1969, see Chrysalis Records. ... In botany, a leaf is an above-ground plant organ specialized for photosynthesis. ...


Silkworm cocoons are processed and used to produce natural silk for clothing. Binomial name Bombyx mori Linnaeus, 1758 For other uses, see Silkworm (disambiguation). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Silk - LoveToKnow 1911 (13064 words)
Into England silk manufacture was introduced during the reign of Henry VI.; but the first serious impulse to manufactures of that class was due to the immigration in 1585 of a large body of skilled Flemish weavers who fled from the Low Countries in consequence of the struggle with Spain then devastating their land.
Silk is readily distinguished from wool and other animal fibres by the action of an alkaline solution of oxide of lead, which darkens wool, andc., owing to the sulphur they contain, but does not affect silk, which is free from that body.
Silks to be finished white are at this point bleached by exposure in a closed chamber to the fumes of sulphurous acid, and at the close of the process the hanks are washed in pure cold water to remove all traces of the acid.
How Silk is Made (1157 words)
The egg, the silk worm, the pupa and the moth.
Filature operations: The cocoons raised by the farmer are delivered to the factory, called a filature, where the silk is unwound from the cocoons and the strands are collected into skeins.
As the filament of the cocoon is too fine for commercial use, three to ten strands are usually reeled at a time to produce the desired diameter of raw silk which is known as "reeled silk".
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