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Encyclopedia > Cocktail
A traditional cocktail.

A cocktail is a style of mixed drink. However, not all mixed drinks are cocktails. A cocktail usually contains one or more types of liquor and flavorings and one or more liqueurs, fruit juices, sauces, honey, milk, cream or spices, etc. The cocktail became popular with Prohibition in the United States. During Prohibition the art of mixing drinks became more and more important to mask the taste of bootlegged alcohol. The bartenders at a speakeasy would mix it with other ingredients, both alcoholic and non-alcoholic. After the repeal of Prohibition, the skills developed in illegal bars became widespread and heralded the golden era of the cocktail, the 1930s. One of the oldest known cocktails, the Cognac-based Sazerac, dates from 1850s New Orleans, as many as 70 years prior to Prohibition. Cocktail can have several meanings: A cocktail is a beverage Cocktail, a 1988 film starring Tom Cruise COCKtail (entertainer), singer/songwriter of I Put the COCK in COCKtail and India Smells Darvon cocktail, a mixture of drugs used to commit suicide. ... Download high resolution version (427x640, 42 KB)cocktail Downloaded from : [[1]] Credits : Dennis Mojado File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (427x640, 42 KB)cocktail Downloaded from : [[1]] Credits : Dennis Mojado File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... In scuba diving, the word cocktail also means a hazard with diving with some rebreathers: it means a caustic solution resulting from water reaching and dissolving the absorbent. ... Spirits redirects here. ... Bottles of strawberry liqueur A liqueur is a sweet alcoholic beverage, often flavoured with fruits, herbs, spices, flowers, seeds, roots, plants, barks, and sometimes cream. ... Juice is the liquid naturally contained in plants. ... For other uses, see Honey (disambiguation). ... A glass of cows milk. ... Cans of cream. ... For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Revenue men at the site of moonshine stills, Kentucky, 1911 or earlier For other uses, see Moonshine (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the song by Dave Matthews Band, see Bartender (song). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The Sazerac is one of the oldest known cocktails. ... // Production of steel revolutionized by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Railroads begin to supplant canals in the United States as a primary means of transporting goods. ... NOLA redirects here. ...


Until the 1970s, cocktails were made predominantly with gin, whiskey or rum, and less commonly vodka. From the 1970s on, the popularity of vodka increased dramatically, and by the 1980s it was the predominant base for mixed drinks. Many cocktails traditionally made with gin, such as the gimlet, or the martini, may now be served by default with vodka. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Gin and tonic. ... Whisky (or whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ... This article is about the beverage. ... Vodka bottling machine, Shatskaya Vodka Shatsk, Russia Vodka (Polish: wódka, Russian: водка) is one of the worlds most popular distilled beverages. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... The gimlet is a cocktail typically made of gin or vodka and lime juice (such as Roses) A 1928 description of the drink was: gin, a spot of lime, and soda (D. B. Wesson, Ill never be Cured III). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

History

"Flaming" cocktails contain a small amount of flammable high-proof alcohol which is ignited prior to consumption.
"Flaming" cocktails contain a small amount of flammable high-proof alcohol which is ignited prior to consumption.

The earliest known printed use of the word "cocktail," as originally determined by David Wondrich in October 2005 [citation needed] , was from "The Farmer's Cabinet", April 28, 1803, p [2]: "11. Drank a glass of cocktail — excellent for the head ... Call'd at the Doct's. found Burnham — he looked very wise — drank another glass of cocktail." Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 880 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 880 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Alcoholic proof is a measure of how much ethanol is in an alcoholic beverage, and is approximately twice the percentage of alcohol by volume (ABV, the unit that is commonly used presently). ...


The second earliest and officially recognised known printed use of the word "cocktail" (and the most well-known) was in the May 13, 1806 edition of the Balance and Columbian Repository, a publication in Hudson, New York , where the paper provided the following answer to what a cocktail was: is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The City of Hudson, the first chartered city of the entire United States, is located along the west border of Columbia County and the east bank of the Hudson River in Columbia County, New York, USA. The population was 7,524 at the 2000 census. ...

"Cocktail is a stimulating liquor composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters — it is vulgarly called a bittered sling and is supposed to be an excellent electioneering potion, inasmuch as it renders the heart stout and bold, at the same time that it fuddles the head. It is said, also to be of great use to a Democratic candidate: because a person, having swallowed a glass of it, is ready to swallow anything else."

It is believed that the term "cocktail" was first used in the village of Elmsford in Westchester County, New York after a local bar ran out of stirrers and resorted to use a cock's tail feathers to stir the drink.[citation needed] The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... Elmsford is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about the state. ... Look up cock in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The Sazerac, which is one of the oldest known cocktails, dates back as far as the 1850s The Sazerac is one of the oldest known cocktails. ... // Production of steel revolutionized by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Railroads begin to supplant canals in the United States as a primary means of transporting goods. ...


The first publication of a bartenders' guide which included cocktail recipes was in 1862: How to Mix Drinks; or, The Bon Vivant's Companion, by Professor Jerry Thomas. In addition to listings of recipes for Punches, Sours, Slings, Cobblers, Shrubs, Toddies, Flips, and a variety of other types of mixed drinks were 10 recipes for drinks referred to as "Cocktails". A key ingredient which differentiated "cocktails" from other drinks in this compendium was the use of bitters as an ingredient, although it is not to be seen in very many modern cocktail recipes. For the song by Dave Matthews Band, see Bartender (song). ... This article is about 1862 . ... bitter An antique (probably 1880s) bitters bottle from Germany that sold for $1240. ...


During Prohibition in the United States (19191933), when the sale of alcoholic beverages was illegal, cocktails were still consumed illegally in establishments known as speakeasies. The quality of the alcohol available was far lower than was previously used, and bartenders generally put forth less effort in preparing the cocktails. Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Etymology

Piña Colada with pieces of coconut
Piña Colada with pieces of coconut

There are several plausible theories as to the origin of the term "cocktail". Among them are: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 2690 KB) cocktails (Pina Colada) with a piece of coconut photographer: Nicolai Schäder (Germany) date: 20-10-2006 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 2690 KB) cocktails (Pina Colada) with a piece of coconut photographer: Nicolai Schäder (Germany) date: 20-10-2006 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

  • Colonial taverns kept their spirits (rum, brandy, whiskey, gin, applejack) in casks, and as the liquid in the casks lowered, the spirits would tend to lose both flavor and potency, so the tavern keeper would have an additional cask into which the tailings from the low casks could be combined and sold at a reduced price, the patrons requesting the "cock tailings" or the tailings from the stop cock of the cask. This was H.L. Mencken's belief.
  • Cocktails were originally a morning beverage, and the cocktail was the name given as metaphor for the rooster (cocktail) heralding morning light of day. This was first posited in 2004 by Ted Haigh in "Vintage Spirits & Forgotten Cocktails". and can be distinguished from the theory "take two snips of the hair of the dog that bit you", which refers to consuming a small bit of alcohol the morning after a "binge drinking night" to curb the effects of the symptoms of the hangover, in the belief that these symptoms are the result of a form of withdrawal. A cock's tail has many varied feathers in exciting colours as a cocktail has varied exciting alcoholic drinks mixed together. Further the cloaca in the tail of cock is the exit hole for many impure substances.
  • Some say that it was customary to put a feather, presumably from a cock's tail, in the drink to serve both as decoration and to signal to teetotalers that the drink contained alcohol.
  • Another etymology is that the term is derived from coquetier, a French egg-cup which was used to serve the beverage in New Orleans in the early 19th century.[1]
  • The beverage was named for a mixed breed horse, known as a "cock-tail" as the beverage, like the horse, was neither strictly spirit nor wine — it was a mixed breed.
  • After cokstele or cock-stick, a type of weighted stick used for throwing at cocks as a sport. See Cock throwing.
  • The word could also be a distortion of Latin [aqua] decocta, meaning "distilled water".

This article is about the phrase. ... Drinking too much alcohol may qualify as binge drinking if it leads to at least two days of inebriation and the drinker neglects usual responsibilities The British Medical Association states that there is no consensus on the definition of drinking. ... Withdrawal, also known as withdrawal syndrome, refers to the characteristic signs and symptoms that appear when a drug that causes physical dependence is regularly used for a long time and then suddenly discontinued or decreased in dosage. ... In zoological anatomy, a cloaca is the posterior opening that serves as the only such opening for the intestinal, urinary, and genital tracts of certain animal species. ... For other uses, see Rooster (disambiguation). ... Teetotalism is the principle or practice of complete abstinence from alcoholic beverages. ... “Grain alcohol” redirects here. ... Image:I89. ... NOLA redirects here. ... William Hogarths First Stage of Cruelty shows schoolboys cock throwing, though it was dangerous practice to hold the rooster while others threw at it. ...

Cocktail Personalities

Living

  • Nick Mautone - Author of "Raising the Bar; Better Drinks Better Entertaining". Beverage Expert and food service consultant, former Managing Partner of Gramercy Tavern, NYC and partner in Trina Lounge in Fort Lauderdale.
  • Simon Difford — UK drinks expert and author of 'sauceguide to cocktails' and 'diffordsguide to cocktails', now in its 6th edition.
  • Wayne Curtis — rum expert and author of And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in 10 Cocktails
  • Dale "King Cocktail" DeGroff — author of The Craft of the Cocktail and bartender at New York's famous Rainbow Room. Founder and current president of The Museum of the American Cocktail. Website: http://www.kingcocktail.com/
  • Ted "Dr. Cocktail" Haigh — author of Vintage Spirit and Forgotton Cocktails, proprietor of CocktailDB.com, founding member and curator of The Museum of the American Cocktail
  • Robert "Drinkboy" Hess — prominent cocktail authority and proprietor of DrinkBoy.com. Founder and current secretary of The Museum of the American Cocktail
  • Gary and Mardee Regan — creators of Regan’s Bitters, authors of many books including The Joy of Mixology and New Classic Cocktails, founding members of The Museum of the American Cocktail
  • Audrey Saunders — former bartender at Bemelmans Bar (New York City), proprietor of the Pegu Club (New York City), prominent mixologist
  • David Wondrich — author of Esquire Drinks and founding member of The Museum of the American Cocktail
  • Stephen Kittredge Cunningham — author of The Bartender's Black Book now in its 8th edition.

The Rainbow Room is a well-known upscale restaurant on the sixty-fifth floor of the GE Building in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. ... The Museum of the American Cocktail is a nonprofit organization dedicated to education in mixology and preserving the rich history of the American cocktail. ... The Museum of the American Cocktail is a nonprofit organization dedicated to education in mixology and preserving the rich history of the American cocktail. ... For the Apple evangelist, see Robert Hess (MacWEEK editor). ... The Museum of the American Cocktail is a nonprofit organization dedicated to education in mixology and preserving the rich history of the American cocktail. ... bitter An antique (probably 1880s) bitters bottle from Germany that sold for $1240. ... The Museum of the American Cocktail is a nonprofit organization dedicated to education in mixology and preserving the rich history of the American cocktail. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Museum of the American Cocktail is a nonprofit organization dedicated to education in mixology and preserving the rich history of the American cocktail. ...

Deceased

  • Jerry Thomas — author of one of the earliest cocktail books, How to Mix Drinks, or The Bon Vivant's Companion (1862), and The Bar-Tender's Guide, or How to Mix All Kinds of Plain and Fancy Drinks (1887)
  • Joe Gilmore — one of the longest running Head Barmen at The Savoy Hotel's American Bar and inventor of many cocktails, including several for Winston Churchill
  • David A. Embury — an attorney and author of The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (1948), a classic cocktail book and one of the first to be a serious study of the art
  • Harry Craddock — bartender at the American Bar at the Savoy Hotel, London during Prohibition and author of "The Savoy Cocktail Book" published in 1930

Joe Gilmore (born 19 May 1922) was one of the longest running Head Barmen at The Savoy Hotels American Bar. ... Savoy Hotel, Strand entrance, 1911 The Savoy Hotel is a five-star hotel located on the Strand, in the City of Westminster in central London that opened in 1889. ... The American Bar is a drinking establishment at the Savoy Hotel in London. ... “Churchill” redirects here. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks is a classic cocktail book by David A. Embury, first published in 1948. ... Harry Craddock was an United States citizen who left during Prohibition and joined the American Bar at the Savoy Hotel, London, in 1920. ... The American Bar is a drinking establishment at the Savoy Hotel in London. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ...

Derivative uses

The word "cocktail" is sometimes used figuratively for a mixture of liquids or other substances that are not necessarily fit for consumption. For example, the usage of such a word could be as follows: "120 years of industry have dosed the area's soil with a noxious cocktail of heavy metals and chemical contaminants". A heavy metal is any of a number of higher atomic weight elements, which has the properties of a metallic substance at room temperature. ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... The Lachine Canal, in Montreal, is badly polluted Pollution is the release of harmful environmental contaminants, or the substances so released. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cocktail
Wikibooks
Wikibooks has a book on the topic of

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Main article: Cocktail Wikibooks Bartending has a page on the topic of Cocktails A cocktail is a style of mixed drink made predominantly with a distilled beverage, such as vodka, gin, whiskey, rum, or tequila, mixed with another drink other than water. ... In scuba diving, the word cocktail also means a hazard with diving with some rebreathers: it means a caustic solution resulting from water reaching and dissolving the absorbent. ... An American-produced bottle of ginjō-shu sake. ... An amber tinted cocktail glass A cocktail glass is a narrow drinking glass having a stem and a wide, shallow, inverted cone fixed above it to hold liquid. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Stanley Clisby Arthur Famous New Orleans Drinks and How to Mix 'Em (Pelican Publishing Company, June 1977), ISBN 0-88289-132-4)

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cocktail - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (822 words)
A cocktail usually contains one or more types of liquor and flavorings, usually one or more of a liqueur, fruit, sauce, honey, milk or cream, spices, etc. The cocktail became popular during Prohibition in the United States primarily to mask the taste of bootlegged alcohol.
Many cocktails traditionally made with gin, such as the gimlet, or the martini, may now be served by default with vodka.
Cocktails were originally a morning beverage, and the cocktail was the name given as metaphor for the rooster (cocktail) heralding morning light of day.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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