FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Cockpit voice recorder
Cockpit Voice Recorder (Exhibit in Deutsches Museum, Munich, Germany). This is a magnetic tape unit built to an old standard TSO C84 as shown on the nameplate. The text on the side in French "FLIGHT RECORDER DO NOT OPEN"
Cockpit Voice Recorder (Exhibit in Deutsches Museum, Munich, Germany). This is a magnetic tape unit built to an old standard TSO C84 as shown on the nameplate. The text on the side in French "FLIGHT RECORDER DO NOT OPEN"

A Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) is a flight recorder used to record the audio environment in the flightdeck of an aircraft for the purpose of investigation of accidents and incidents. This is typically achieved by recording the signals of the microphones and earphones of the pilots headsets and of an area microphone in the roof of the cockpit. The current applicable FAA TSO is C123b titled Cockpit Voice Recorder Equipment.[1] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 598 pixelsFull resolution (870 × 650 pixel, file size: 121 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 598 pixelsFull resolution (870 × 650 pixel, file size: 121 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... In aircraft, the flight data recorder (FDR) and the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) are used to record aircraft and pilot behavior in order to analyze accidents, and are usually called black boxes by the news media. ... FAA may refer to: Federal Aviation Administration in the United States Fleet Air Arm in the UK Royal Navy Fuerza Aérea Argentina in Argentina This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A Technical Standard Order (TSO) is a minimum performance standard issued by the United States Federal Aviation Administration for specified materials, parts, processes, and appliances used on civil aircraft. ...


Where an aircraft is required to carry a CVR and utilises digital communications the CVR is required to record such communications with air traffic control unless this is recorded elsewhere. It is at present (2005) a requirement that the recording duration is a minimum of thirty minutes,[2] but it is recommended that it should be two hours.[3]

Contents

Overview

A standard CVR is capable of recording 4 channels of audio data for a period of 2 hours. The original requirement was for a CVR to record for 30 minutes, but this has been found to be insufficient in many cases, significant parts of the audio data needed for a subsequent investigation having occurred more than 30 minutes before the end of the recording.


The earliest CVRs used analog wire recording, later replaced by analog magnetic tape. Some of the tape units used two reels, with the tape automatically reversing at each end. The original was the ARL Flight Memory Unit produced in 1957 by David Warren and an instrument maker named Tych Mirfield. A Peirce 55-B dictation wire recorder from 1945. ... Compact audio cassette Magnetic tape is a non-volatile storage medium consisting of a magnetic coating on a thin plastic strip. ... An example of a FDR (Flight Data Recorder). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... David L. Warren is currently a president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). ...


Other units used a single reel, with the tape spliced into a continuous loop, much as in an 8-track cartridge. The tape would circulate and old audio information would be overwritten every 30 minutes. Recovery of sound from magnetic tape often proves difficult if the recorder is recovered from water and its housing has been breached. Thus, the latest designs employ solid-state memory and use digital recording techniques, making them much more resistant to shock, vibration and moisture. With the reduced power requirements of solid-state recorders, it is now practical to incorporate a battery in the units, so that recording can continue until flight termination, even if the aircraft electrical system fails. The 8-track cartridge or Stereo 8 is a magnetic tape technology for audio storage, popular from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s. ...


Like the flight data recorder (FDR), the CVR is typically mounted in the empennage of an airplane to maximize the likelihood of its survival in a crash.[citation needed] An example of a FDR (Flight Data Recorder). ... Empennage is an aviation term used to describe the tail portion of an aircraft. ...


Future devices

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board has asked for the installation of cockpit image recorders in large transport aircraft to provide information that would supplement existing CVR and FDR data in accident investigations. They also recommended image recorders be placed into smaller aircraft that are not required to have a CVR or FDR.[3] Seal of the National Transportation Safety Board The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is a U.S. government independent organization responsible for investigation of accidents involving aviation, highway, marine, pipelines and railroads in the United States. ...


Such systems, estimated to cost less than $8,000 installed, typically consist of a camera and microphone located in the cockpit to continuously record cockpit instrumentation, the outside viewing area, engine sounds, radio communications, and ambient cockpit sounds. As with conventional CVRs and FDRs, data from such a system is stored in a crash-protected unit to ensure survivability.[3]


Since the recorders can sometimes be crushed into unreadable pieces, or even never located in deep water, some modern units are self-ejecting (taking advantage of kinetic energy at impact to separate themselves from the aircraft) and also equipped with radio and sonar beacons (see emergency locator transmitter) to aid in their location. The kinetic energy of an object is the extra energy which it possesses due to its motion. ... This article is about underwater sound propagation. ... Emergency position-indicating rescue beacons (EPIRB), also called Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) or Personal Locator Beacon, are small radio transmitters that some satellites and search and rescue aircraft can use to locate people, boats and aircraft needing rescue. ...


On 19 July 2005, the Safe Aviation and Flight Enhancement Act of 2005 was introduced and referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the U.S. House of Representatives. This bill would require installation of a second cockpit voice recorder, digital flight data recorder system and emergency locator transmitter that utilizes combination deployable recorder technology in each commercial passenger aircraft that is currently required to carry each of those recorders. The deployable recorder system would be ejected from the rear of the aircraft at the moment of an accident. The bill was referred to the Subcommittee on Aviation and has not progressed since.[4][5] is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure has jurisdiction over: Aviation Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Railroads Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Highways, Transit, and Pipelines Water Resources and Environment A subcommittee represents each area of jurisdiction. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... A digital system is one that uses discrete values (often electrical voltages), especially those representable as binary numbers, or non-numeric symbols such as letters or icons, for input, processing, transmission, storage, or display, rather than a continuous spectrum of values (ie, as in an analog system). ...


Related

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board has recommended that railroad voice recorders be required in locomotives.[6] Seal of the National Transportation Safety Board The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is a U.S. government independent organization responsible for investigation of accidents involving aviation, highway, marine, pipelines and railroads in the United States. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Great Western Railway No. ...


Cultural references

The heavy metal band Rammstein's album Reise, Reise is made to look like a CVR; it also includes a recording from a crash. Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... For other uses, see Ramstein. ... Reise, Reise (German for Arise, Arise (naval jargon) or Travel, travel or Journey, journey) is the German NDH-metal band Rammsteins fourth album. ...


Members of Collective: Unconscious made a theatrical presentation[7] based on transcripts from CVR recordings.


See also

An example of a FDR (Flight Data Recorder). ... An example of a FDR (Flight Data Recorder). ... Air safety is a broad term encompassing the theory, investigation and categorization of flight failures, and the prevention of such failures through appropriate regulation, as well as through education and training. ... The term Black Box is a placeholder name used casually, often by journalists, to refer to a collection of several different recording devices used in transportation: the flight data recorder, flight recorder and cockpit voice recorder in aircraft, the event recorder in railway diesel locomotives, the Event Data Recorder in... Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs), Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs) and Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs) are tracking transmitters that operate as part of the Cospas-Sarsat satellite system. ... Emergency position-indicating rescue beacons (EPIRB) are small radio transmitters that some satellites and search and rescue aircraft can use locate people or boats needing rescue. ...

References

  1. ^ Cockpit Voice Recorder Equipment (PDF). Federal Aviation Administration (2006-06-01). Retrieved on 2007-04-21.
  2. ^ http://www.risingup.com/fars/info/part121-359-FAR.shtml
  3. ^ a b c http://www.ntsb.gov/recs/mostwanted/aviation_recorders.htm
  4. ^ http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c109:H.R.3336.IH:
  5. ^ http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d109:h.r.03336:
  6. ^ http://www.ntsb.gov/speeches/s980520.htm
  7. ^ Collective: Unconscious

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cockpit voice recorder

This article contains material that originally came from an NTSB website. According to their site usage guidelines, "Text appearing on NTSB Web pages, in reports, recommendation, and public dockets, unless otherwise noted, was prepared by employees of the United States Government as part of their official duties and, therefore, is not subject to copyright." For more information, please review NTSB's use policies. Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is a U.S. government organization responsible for investigation of accidents involving aviation, highway, marine, pipelines and railroads in the United States. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cockpit voice recorder - definition of Cockpit voice recorder in Encyclopedia (772 words)
In aircraft, the flight data recorder (FDR) and the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) are used to record aircraft and pilot behavior in order to analyze accidents, and are usually called "fl boxes" by the news media.
Since the tape or wire's recording speed can be erroneous, usually the data is recorded for a fixed time, and then the howls are turned off for a bit.
FAA regulations require both recorders to withstand 1100 ° C for thirty minutes, the water pressure at 20,000 feet deep and 3,400 gravities for 6.5 ms.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m