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The term cockney is often used to refer to working-class people of London, particularly east London, and the slang used by these people. It is also often used in reference to the "cockney accent." Download high resolution version (607x911, 90 KB) photo by lonpicman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (607x911, 90 KB) photo by lonpicman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... St Mary-le-Bow Church, built 1671-1680, one of Wrens City Churches built after the Great Fire of London Interior St Mary-le-Bow (Bow Church) is a historic church in the City of London, off Cheapside. ... Statue of a coal miner in Charleston, WV, USA. Working class is a term used in academic sociology and in ordinary conversation. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... East London area East London is the name commonly given to the north eastern part of London, England on the north side of the River Thames. ... Cockney rhyming slang is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ...


A "true" cockney is often said to be someone born within earshot of the Bow Bells, i.e. the bells of St Mary-le-Bow church in Cheapside in the City of London (which is not itself in the East End). However, the bells were silent from the outbreak of World War II until 1961[1]. Also, as the general din in London has increased, the area in which the bells can be heard has contracted. Formerly it included the City, Clerkenwell, Finsbury, Shoreditch, Hoxton, Stepney, Bethnal Green, Limehouse, Mile End, Wapping, Whitechapel, Shadwell, Bermondsey, Rotherhithe, Borough and Peckham although according to the legend of Dick Whittington the bells could also be heard from as far away as Highgate[2]. The association with Cockney and the East End in the public imagination may be due to many people assuming that Bow Bells are to be found in the district of Bow, rather than the lesser known St Mary-le-Bow church. St Mary-le-Bow Church, built 1671-1680, one of Wrens City Churches built after the Great Fire of London Interior St Mary-le-Bow (Bow Church) is a historic church in the City of London, off Cheapside. ... This article is about the street in London. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region Greater London Status sui generis, City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor John Stuttard  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - City  1. ... The East End of London, known locally as the East End, is an area, with no formal authority or boundaries, that spans a number of administative districts of London in England. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region Greater London Status sui generis, City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor John Stuttard  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - City  1. ... Clerkenwell Green and St James church Clerkenwell is an area of central London in the London Borough of Islington. ... Finsbury is a place in the south of the London Borough of Islington. ... Shoreditch Town Hall Shoreditch is a place in the London Borough of Hackney. ... Hoxton Square. ... Stepney is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Limehouse Town Hall Limehouse is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Mile End is an area of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in East London, England. ... Wapping Old Stairs, one of many points of access to the foreshore in the area. ... Whitechapel is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom. ... Shadwell is an inner-city district in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets located on the north bank of the Thames between Wapping to the west and Limehouse to the east. ... , Bermondsey is an area of south London in the London Borough of Southwark. ... St Olavs, Rotherhithes Norwegian church. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... , Peckham is an area of London, England, in the London Borough of Southwark, located 3. ... Dick Whittington is a character in British pantomime, very loosely based on the real-life Richard Whittington. ... View of Highgate, John Constable, 1st quarter of 19th century. ...

Contents

Etymology

The term was in use in this sense as early as 1600, when Samuel Rowlands, in his satire The Letting of Humours Blood in the Head-Vaine, referred to 'a Bowe-bell Cockney'[3]. John Minsheu (or Minshew) was the first lexicographer to define the word in this sense, in his Ductor in Linguas (1617), where he referred to 'A cockney or cockny, applied only to one born within the sound of Bow bell, that is in the City of London'[4]. However, the etymologies he gave (from 'cock' and 'neigh', or from Latin incoctus, raw) were just guesses, and the OED later authoritatively explained the term as originating from cock and egg, meaning first a misshapen egg (1362), then a person ignorant of country ways (1521), then the senses mentioned above. 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Samuel Rowlands (c. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... John Minsheu (or Minshew) (1560 - 1627) was an English linguist and lexicographer. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ... Not to be confused with Entomology, the scientific study of insects. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1357 1358 1359 1360 1361 - 1362 - 1363 1364 1365 1366 1367 See also: 1362 state leaders Events Under Edward III, English replaces French as Englands national language, for the... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ...


Francis Grose's A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1785) derives the term from the following story: Francis Grose (1731 - 1791), antiquary and lexicographer, of Swiss extraction, was Richmond Herald 1755-63. ... Taken from the British Library Learning website page [1]: Francis Groses A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue was first published in 1785 and is a dictionary of slang. ...

A citizen of London, being in the country, and hearing a horse neigh, exclaimed, Lord! how that horse laughs! A by-stander telling him that noise was called Neighing, the next morning, when the cock crowed, the citizen to shew he had not forgot what was told him, cried out, Do you hear how the Cock Neighs?[5]

An alternative derivation of the word can be found in Webster's New Universal Unabridged Dictionary: London was referred to by the Normans as the "Land of Sugar Cake" (Old French: pais de cocaigne), an imaginary land of idleness and luxury. A humorous appellation, the word "Cocaigne" referred to all of London and its suburbs, and over time had a number of spellings: Cocagne, Cockayne, and in Middle English, Cocknay and Cockney. The latter two spellings could be used to refer to both pampered children, and residents of London, and to pamper or spoil a child was 'to cocker' him. (See, for example, John Locke, "...that most children's constitutions are either spoiled or at least harmed, by cockering and tenderness." from Some Thoughts Concerning Education, 1693) 1888 advertisement for Websters Dictionary Websters Dictionary is the common title given to English language dictionaries in the United States, derived from American lexicographer Noah Webster. ... Pieter Bruegel the Elders „Das Schlaraffenland“ (The Land of Cockaigne), painted in 1567. ... Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... For other persons named John Locke, see John Locke (disambiguation). ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ...


Cockney area

The region in which "Cockneys" reside has changed over time, and is no longer the whole of London. As mentioned in the introduction, the traditional definition is that in order to be a Cockney, one must have been born within earshot of the Bow Bells. However, the church of St Mary-le-Bow was destroyed in 1666 by the Great Fire of London and rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren. After the bells were destroyed again in 1941 in The Blitz of World War II, and before they were replaced in 1961, there was a period when by this definition no 'Bow-bell' Cockneys could be born. The use of such a literal definition produces other problems, since traffic noise and the current lack of a hospital with a maternity ward in earshot of the church [citation needed] would also severely limit the number of 'true' Cockneys that could be born. 1666 is often called Annus Mirabilis. ... Detail of painting from 1666 of the Great Fire of London by an unknown artist, depicting the fire as it would have appeared on the evening of Tuesday, 4 September from a boat in the vicinity of Tower Wharf. ... Christopher Wren. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Blitz. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A study was carried by the city in 2000 to see how far the Bow Bells could be heard[citation needed], and it was estimated that the bells would have been heard six miles to the east, five miles to the north, three miles to the south, and four miles to the west. Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Thus while all East Enders are Cockneys, not all Cockneys are East Enders. The traditional core neighbourhoods of the East End are Bethnal Green, Whitechapel, Spitalfields, Stepney, Wapping, Limehouse, Poplar, Millwall, Hackney, Shoreditch, Bow and Mile End. The area gradually expanded as more land was built upon. The East End of London, known locally as the East End, is an area, with no formal authority or boundaries, that spans a number of administative districts of London in England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Whitechapel is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom. ... Christ Church, Spitalfields Spitalfields, an area in Tower Hamlets, east London near to Liverpool Street station and Brick Lane which gets its name from a contraction of hospital fields, as there used to be a major hospital in the area. ... Stepney is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Wapping Old Stairs, one of many points of access to the foreshore in the area. ... Limehouse Town Hall Limehouse is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Poplar is an area of the East End of London in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... , Millwall is an area in London, on the western side of the Isle of Dogs, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... The London Borough of Hackney is a London Borough in the east end of London and part of inner London. ... Shoreditch Town Hall Shoreditch is a place in the London Borough of Hackney. ... Bow is an area of East London, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Mile End is an area of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in East London, England. ...


Migration of Cockneys has also led to migration of the dialect. As Chatham Dockyard expanded during the 18th Century, large numbers of workers were relocated from the dockland areas of London, bringing with them a "Cockney" accent and vocabulary. Within a short period this famously distinguished Chatham from the neighbouring areas, including the City of Rochester, which had the traditional Kentish accent. In Essex, towns that mostly grew up from post-war migration out of London (e.g. Basildon, Harlow and West Horndon) often have a strong Cockney influence on local speech. Basildon (IPA, ) is a New Town located in south Essex, England at . It was designated as a New Town after World War II in 1948 to accommodate the London population overspill. ... Harlow is a new town and local government district in Essex, England. ... West Horndon is a village in the south of the Brentwood borough of Essex on the boundary with Thurrock and in the East of England. ...


Cockney speech

Cockney speakers have a distinctive accent and dialect, and frequently use Cockney rhyming slang. The Survey of English Dialects took a recording from a long-time resident of Hackney.[6] Cockney rhyming slang is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ... The Survey of English Dialects was undertaken between 1950 and 1961 under the direction of Professor Harold Orton of the English department of the University of Leeds. ...


John Camden Hotten, in his Slang Dictionary of 1859 makes reference to "their use of a peculiar slang language" when describing the costermongers of London's East End. In terms of other slang, there are also several borrowings from Yiddish, including kosher (originally Hebrew, via Yiddish, meaning legitimate) and shtumm (/ʃtʊm/ originally German, via Yiddish, meaning quiet[7]), as well as Romany, for example wonga (meaning money, from the Romany "wanga" meaning coal[8]), and cushty (from the Romany kushtipen, meaning good). A fake Cockney accent, as used by some actors, is sometimes called 'Mockney'. Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A costermonger was a street seller of fruit and vegetables. ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... Romany (or Romani) relates to: The Roma: a people sometimes pejoratively called Gypsies. Their language Romany was the pseudonym of a broadcaster and writer of Roma descent, George Bramwell Evens. ... In British English, the term mockney (a Portmanteau of mock and Cockney) has come to be used, predominantly in the media, to describe those who present themselves as Cockneys (or, by extension, other working-class groups) with the intention of gaining popular credibility. ...


Typical features of Cockney speech include:

  • T-glottalisation: Use of the glottal stop as an allophone of /t/ in various positions[9][10], including after a stressed syllable. /t/ may also be flapped intervocalically[11]
  • Loss of dental fricatives[12]:
    • /θ/ becomes [f] in all environments. [mæf] "math"
    • /ð/ becomes [v] in all environments except word-initially when it is [d]. [bɒvə] "bother," [dæɪ] "they."
  • Diphthong alterations[13]:
    • /eɪ/[æɪ]: [bæɪʔ] "bait"
    • /əʊ/[æʉ]: [kʰæʉʔ] "coat"
    • /aɪ/[ɑɪ]: [bɑɪʔ] "bite"
    • /aʊ/ may be [æə]: [tʰæən] "town"
  • Other vowel differences include
    • /æ/[ɛ̝] or [ɛi][14]: [tʰɛ̝n] "tan"
    • /ʌ/[ɐ̟][15]
    • /ɔː//oː/ when in non-final position[16]
    • /iː/[əi][17]: [bəiʔ] "beet"
    • /uː/[əʉ] or [ʉː][18]: [bʉːʔ] "boot"
  • Vocalisation of dark l, hence [mɪowɔː] for Millwall. The actual realization of a vocalized /l/ is influenced by surrounding vowels and it may be realized as [u], [o], or [ɤ][19]
  • Grammatical features:[20]
    • Use of me instead of my, for example, "At's me book you got 'ere ."
    • Use of ain't instead of isn't, am not, are not, has not, and have not
  • Use of double negatives, for example "I didn't see nothing"[citation needed]

Most of the features mentioned above have in recent years partly spread into more general south-eastern speech, giving the accent called Estuary English; an Estuary speaker will use some but not all of the Cockney sounds. The characteristics of Cockney as opposed to Estuary are the dropping of H and grammatical features like the use of ain't. Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... In linguistics, l-vocalization is a process by which an sound (a lateral consonant) is replaced by a vowel or semivowel sound. ... , Millwall is an area in London, on the western side of the Isle of Dogs, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... A double negative occurs when two forms of negation are used in the same sentence. ... Estuary English is a name given to the form of English widely spoken in South East England, especially along the river Thames and its estuary. ...


A television advertisement for Heineken beer in the 1980s showed a Sloane woman receiving elocution lessons in Cockney, parodying My Fair Lady. In the advert, she was being taught to say "The wa'er in Majorca don' taste like wot it ough' a", but could only manage a posh rendition of "The water in Mallorca doesn't taste quite how it should" (until, of course, she drank the beer). Heineken Pilsener is an alcoholic lager beer made by Heineken since 1868. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... The term Sloane Ranger (often pluralised to just Sloanes or Sloanies) originally referred to the young upper- and upper-middle-class men and women living in West London. ... My Fair Lady is a musical with a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe, based on George Bernard Shaws Pygmalion. ... Look up Posh in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


More recently, the Geico automobile insurance company has used a gecko lizard in its television advertising campaign that speaks in a cockney accent. The character is voiced by Jake Wood. Jake Wood (born 12 July 1972) is a British actor. ...


Today, certain elements of Cockney English are declining in usage within the area it is most associated with, displaced by a Jamaican Creole-influenced variety gaining popularity amongst young Londoners, particularly, though far from exclusively, those of Afro-Caribbean descent. [citation needed] Nevertheless, the glottal stop, double negatives, and the vocalization of the dark L (and other features of traditional cockney speech), along with some rhyming slang terms are still in common usage. As cockneys have moved out of London, they have often taken their dialect with them. There may actually be more speakers of the Cockney dialect in Dagenham than in Whitechapel, even though the former is not in the traditional Cockney area. The East End of London, known locally as the East End, is an area, with no formal authority or boundaries, that spans a number of administative districts of London in England. ... Jamaican Creole, also known locally as Patois/(Patwa) or simply Jamaican, is an English/African-based language --not to be confused with Jamaican English nor with the Rastafarian use of English-- used primarily on the island of Jamaica. ... Afro-Caribbean may refer to: the British Afro-Caribbean community other members of the African diaspora in or from the Carribean This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


Drama, fiction and poetry

Steptoe and Son is a British sitcom written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson about two rag and bone men living in Oil Drum Lane, a fictional street in Shepherds Bush, London. ... Bedknobs and Broomsticks is a 1971 musical film produced by Walt Disney Productions, which combines live action and animation; it premiered on October 7, 1971. ... This article is about the Mary Poppins series of childrens books. ... A Rough Collie Collie refers to various breeds of herding dog originating primarily in Scotland. ... This entire article, especially the controversy section and the discussion of its cancellation does not cite any references or sources. ... Wendy Richard MBE (born Wendy Emerton on 20 July 1943) is a popular English actress best known for playing Miss Brahms in Are You Being Served? from 1972 to 1985 and Pauline Fowler in EastEnders from 1985 to 2006. ... Are You Being Served? was a long-running British sitcom broadcast from 1972 to 1985. ... The Widow at Windsor is a poem by Rudyard Kipling, part of the first set of the Barrack-Room Ballads. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... For other uses, see A Tale of Two Cities (disambiguation). ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... Play cover, depicting Mrs Campbell as Eliza Pygmalion (1913) is a play by George Bernard Shaw based on Ovids tale of Pygmalion. ... My Fair Lady is a musical with a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe, based on George Bernard Shaws Pygmalion. ... Families At least 9, see article. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Les Misérables is an 1862 novel by the famous French novelist Victor Hugo, set in the Parisian underworld. ... Angela Carter (May 7, 1940 – February 16, 1992) was an English novelist and journalist, known for her post-feminist magical realist and science fiction works. ... Nights at the Circus is a novel by Angela Carter, first published in 1984. ... W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Liza of Lambeth (1897) was William Somerset Maughams first novel, which he wrote while working as a doctor at a hospital in Lambeth, then a working class district of London. ... Me and My Girl is a popular British stage musical, with book and lyrics by Douglas Furber and L. Arthur Rose and music by Noel Gay. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... EastEnders is a popular BBC television soap opera, first broadcast in the United Kingdom on BBC1 on 19 February 1985[4] and continuing to date. ... The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction, usually broadcast on television... Information Occupation Carpenter Relationships Single Portrayed by Gary Holton Wayne Winston Norris (b. ... Auf Wiedersehen, Pet is a popular British comedy-drama series about a group of seven British migrant construction workers: Wayne, Dennis, Oz, Bomber, Barry, Neville and Moxey, who are living and working on a German building site. ... Private Joe Walker is a fictional black market spiv (or Wholesales Trader, as he politely puts it) and Home Guard platoon member portrayed by actor James Beck on the BBC television sitcom Dads Army. ... Dads Army is a British sitcom about the Home Guard in World War II, written by Jimmy Perry and David Croft and broadcast on BBC television between 1968 and 1977. ... Guy Ritchie (born 10th September 1968 in Hatfield, Hertfordshire[1]) is an English writer-director. ... Snatch (2000) is a film by British director Guy Ritchie. ... Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) is a violent, English black comedy film directed and written by Guy Ritchie. ... Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... My Fair Lady is a musical with a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe, based on George Bernard Shaws Pygmalion. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... For other uses, see Sweeney Todd (disambiguation). ... Oceans Eleven is a 2001 remake of the 1960 Rat Pack caper film Oceans Eleven. ... Danny Blue Danny Blue is a character in the popular BBC television show Hustle. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Hustle is a British television comedy-drama series made by Kudos Film & Television for BBC One in the United Kingdom. ... The Limey is a revenge neo-noir crime drama, directed by Steven Soderbergh The film starring Terence Stamp as Wilson, an Englishman straight out of prison and on parole who comes to Los Angeles, California to investigate the suspicious death of his daughter. ... This article is about childrens television series. ... Ten Cents Ten Cents is a fictional character who appeared in the 1988 television series TUGS, created by the producers of Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends. ... Fable is a video game for Xbox. ... Oliver! is a British musical, with music and lyrics by Lionel Bart. ... Minder was a British comedy-drama about the London criminal underworld. ... Cockney rhyming slang (sometimes intitialized as CRS) is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ... The Mighty Boosh is a British cult comedy about two friends who go on magical adventures. ... Mind Your Language is a British comedy television series originally shown on ITV between 1977 and 1979. ... Rose Tyler is a fictional character played by Billie Piper in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Billie Paul Piper (born Leanne Paul Piper[1] on 22 September 1982) is an British actress. ... For other uses, see Doctor Who (disambiguation). ... Mungojerrie is a light hearted Calico cat created by T. S. Eliot and used in the musical CATS. Mungojerrie and his partner in crime, Rumpleteazer, are of orange/black/brown colors. ... Rumpelteazer (or Rumpleteazer) is a character in T. S. Eliots book Old Possums Book of Practical Cats and Andrew Lloyd Webbers musical Cats. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965), was a poet, dramatist and literary critic. ... Old Possums Book of Practical Cats is a set of whimsical poems by T. S. Eliot about feline psychology and sociology. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre, and also the elder brother of cellist Julian Lloyd Webber. ... Cats is an award-winning musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber based on Old Possums Book of Practical Cats and other poems by T. S. Eliot. ... Green Street is a 2005 film, starring Elijah Wood and Charlie Hunnam, about football hooliganism in England. ... To Sir, with Love (1967) is a British film starring Sidney Poitier that deals with social issues in an inner city school, written and directed by James Clavell and based on the memoir of the same name by E.R. Braithwaite. ... Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (born 10 October 1930) is an English playwright, screenwriter, poet, actor, director, author, and political activist. ... Philip Ridley is a multi-talented artist born in London, England. ... “HP3” redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The cover of the current Codex: Orks sourcebook The Orks are a race from the fictional Warhammer 40,000 universe. ... This article is about the tabletop miniature wargame and the fictional universe in which it is set. ... Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War is a Real Time Strategy game for the PC developed by Relic Entertainment and published by THQ. Based on Games Workshops popular tabletop wargame, Warhammer 40,000, Dawn of War was released in September 2004. ... Dune 2 (1992), an early RTS A real-time strategy (RTS) game is a type of computer strategy game which does not have turns like conventional turn-based strategy video or board games. ... Lucky Stiff is a farcical musical comedy. ... Irregular Webcomic! is a webcomic created by David Morgan-Mar, an Australian physicist. ... Richard Dawson (born November 20, 1932) is a British-born American actor, comedian, game show panelist and host. ... Hogans Heroes was an American television situation comedy that ran from September 17, 1965 to July 4, 1971 on the CBS network for 168 episodes. ... Armed & Dangerous is a video game created by Planet Moon Studios in collaboration with LucasArts. ... Beerfest is a beer-themed comedy film by the comedy group Broken Lizard released 2006. ... The Football Factory is a 2004 English film, directed by Nick Love and starring Danny Dyer and Frank Harper. ... The Business may mean: The Business, a British Sunday broadsheet newspaper The Business, a novel The Business, a band The Business, a term describing something that is excellent, or well-done. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... This article is about the novel. ... John Robert Fowles John Robert Fowles (March 31, 1926 – November 5, 2005) was an English novelist and essayist. ... The French Lieutenants Woman is a 1969 novel by John Fowles. ... This article describes both the animated television series, and the characters from that series. ... Lee-Hom Wang (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; born May 17, 1976; also referred to as, Wang Leehom, or just Leehom) is a four time Golden Melody Award-winning American singer-songwriter and actor who has achieved highly recognized success in Taiwan, Mainland China, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, Thailand and the rest... This article is about minor characters in the television series Firefly. ... Firefly is an American science fiction television series created by writer/director Joss Whedon, creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel, under his Mutant Enemy Productions. ... Bloody Jack can refer to: Bloody Jack, the nickname of 19th century Māori chief Tuhawaiki. ... Serialized in Weekly Shonen Magazine Original run 16 May 2003 – Present No. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Only Fools and Horses is a British television sitcom, created and written by John Sullivan, and made and broadcast by the BBC. Seven series were originally broadcast in the UK between 1981 and 1991, with sporadic Christmas specials until 2003. ...

Famous Londoners

The International League (IL) is a minor league baseball league which operates in the eastern United States and Canada. ... Nickname: Location of London in relation to Middlesex County and the Province of Ontario Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario County Middlesex County Settled 1826 as a village Incorporated 1855 as a city Government  - City Mayor Anne Marie DeCicco-Best  - Governing Body London City Council  - MPs Sue Barnes (LPC) Glen Pearson... The Cockney Rejects are an Oi! punk band which formed in the East End of London in 1979. ... Alfie Bass as the Giant in The Goodies and the Beanstalk (VHS) Alfred Bass (April 8, 1921 – July 15, 1987) was a diminutive cockney-accented Jewish actor, born in Bethnal Green, London, England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The London Borough of Hackney is a London Borough in the east end of London and part of inner London. ... Bernard Bresslaw (born Stepney, London, February 25, 1934 - Enfield, June 11, 1993) was an English actor who was trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. ... Stepney is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Eric Bristow MBE (The Crafty Cockney) (born Hackney, London, 25 April 1957) is a British darts player, whose skill at the game in the 1980s helped turn it into a worldwide spectator sport. ... Hackney is the principal area of the London Borough of Hackney in East London. ... Max Bygraves - CD cover Max Bygraves OBE (born 16 October 1922 in Rotherhithe, London as Walter William Bygraves) is an English singer songwriter, famous for his waving hands. ... St Olavs, Rotherhithes Norwegian church. ... This article is about the English actor. ... ... St Olavs, Rotherhithes Norwegian church. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Bow is an area of East London, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... “Charles Chaplin” redirects here. ... ... , St. ... Chas & Dave are Cockney pop rock music artists, often billed as Chas n Dave. ... Sir John Edward Cohen (6 October 1898–24 March 1979), born Jacob Edward Kohen and commonly known as Jack Cohen, was a British businessman who founded the Tesco supermarket chain. ... For other uses, see Tesco (disambiguation). ... Whitechapel is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom. ... Windsor Davies (born August 28, 1930) is an English-born Welsh actor. ... , Canning Town is an area of East London, England and is one of the best places in the eastern part of London. ... Roger Caesar Marius Bernard de Delgado Torres Castillo Roberto (March 1, 1918 – June 18, 1973) was a British actor, best known for his role as the Master in Doctor Who. ... Whitechapel is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom. ... Craig Fairbrass (born Stepney, London 1964) is an English actor. ... Stepney is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Bud Flanagan was a popular Wartime entertainer, born Chaim Reuven Weintrop 14th October 1896 in Whitechapel, the East End, London, England and died 20th October 1968. ... Whitechapel is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom. ... This article is about the English model and singer; for the American erotic actress, see Samantha Fox (porn star). ... Mile End is an area of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in East London, England. ... Gary Holton (22 September 1952 - 25 October 1985) was an English actor and musician from London. ... Hackney is the principal area of the London Borough of Hackney in East London. ... Kenneth Thomas Kenney (or Kenny) Jones (born September 16, 1948 in Stepney, London) is a veteran English rock drummer best known for his work in the Small Faces, the Faces, and The Who. ... Stepney is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Ronald Ronnie Kray (24 October 1933 – 17 March 1995) and Reginald Reggie Kray (24 October 1933 – 1 October 2000) were identical twin brothers, and the foremost organised crime leaders in Londons East End during the 1950s and 60s. ... Hoxton Square. ... Ronald Lane (April 1, 1946 - June 4, 1997) was an English singer, songwriter and bass player (nicknamed Plonk) best known for his membership in two prominent English rock bands, Small Faces (1965-69) and Faces (1970-75). ... Bow is an area of East London, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Angela Lansbury CBE (born October 16, 1925) is a four-time Tony-winning, six-time Golden Globe-winning, three-time Oscar-nominated, and eighteen-time Emmy-nominated English actress. ... Poplar is an area of the East End of London in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Dame Vera Lynn DBE (born 20 March 1917) is a retired British singer whose career flourished during World War II, when she was nicknamed The Forces Sweetheart. She is best known for the popular songs Well Meet Again and The White Cliffs of Dover. Lynn is one of the... East Ham is a place in the London Borough of Newham. ... Leonard McLean (April 9, 1949 - July 28, 1998), better known as The Guvnor, was a famed East End of London bareknuckle fighter, bouncer, former criminal, author, television presenter, and actor; McLean was often referred to as the hardest man in Britain. McLean made his name in the late 1960s... Hoxton Square. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 1998 films | British films ... Leonard Gary Oldman (born March 21, 1958) is an English actor, writer and director who initially came to prominence for his portrayal of Sid Vicious in the 1986 film Sid & Nancy. ... , New Cross is a district on the north tip of the London Borough of Lewisham. ... This article is about the entertainer. ... The Hackney Empire is one of the oldest surviving music halls in Britain. ... Philip Ridley is a multi-talented artist born in London, England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Stepney is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Terence Stamp (born July 22, 1939) is an English actor. ... Stepney is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Young Love by Tommy Steele Tommy Steele OBE (born December 17, 1936 in London, England) is a English entertainer. ... , Bermondsey is an area of south London in the London Borough of Southwark. ... Sir Alan Michael Sugar (born 24 March 1947) is an English businessman with an estimated fortune of £700 million. ... The Hackney Empire is one of the oldest surviving music halls in Britain. ... Barbara Ann Deeks MBE (born 6 August 1937), better known as Barbara Windsor, sometimes known as Babs Windsor, is an English actress. ... Shoreditch Town Hall Shoreditch is a place in the London Borough of Hackney. ... Raymond Andrew Winstone (born February 19, 1957) is an Emmy Award winning English film and television actor. ... The London Borough of Hackney is a London Borough in the east end of London and part of inner London. ...

Famous cockney performances

Bill Bailey is also the name commonly used to refer to a popular song with the full title of Wont You Come Home Bill Bailey. Mark Bill Bailey (born 24 February 1964, Bath, Somerset) is an English comedian, actor, and musician known for appearing on Never Mind the Buzzcocks... Timothy Bateson (born April 3, 1926, London, England) is a British actor. ... The speedy deletion of this page is contested. ... Labyrinth is a 1986 fantasy film directed by Jim Henson, produced by George Lucas, and designed through the art of Brian Froud. ... Ronnie Barker Ronald William George Barker OBE (September 25, 1929 – October 3, 2005), popularly known as Ronnie Barker and (as a writer) Gerald Wiley , was an English comic actor and writer. ... Norman Stanley Fletcher, played by Ronnie Barker Norman Stanley Fletch Fletcher (born February 2, 1932) is the main character in the popular BBC sitcom Porridge. ... Porridge was a British BBC television sitcom (1974–1977), written by Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais and starring Ronnie Barker and Richard Beckinsale. ... This article does not adequately cite its references. ... Private Joe Walker is a fictional black market spiv (or Wholesales Trader, as he politely puts it) and Home Guard platoon member portrayed by actor James Beck on the BBC television sitcom Dads Army. ... Dad’s Army is a British sitcom about the Home Guard in the Second World War, written by Jimmy Perry and David Croft and broadcast on BBC television between 1968 and 1977. ... Kathy Burke (born June 13, 1964) is a British actress. ... Gimme Gimme Gimme is a BBC television comedy by Tiger Aspect Productions that ran for three series between 1999 and 2001. ... Nil by Mouth (or NBM) can mean: The British translation of the medical instruction nil per os (NPO) for patients who may not take any substances orally for various reasons Nil by Mouth, a sectarian charity in Glasgow, Scotland Nil by Mouth, a 1997 British film Nil By Mouth, a... This article is about the English actor. ... The Italian Job is a British caper film, written by Troy Kennedy Martin, produced by Michael Deeley and directed by Peter Collinson. ... The Ipcress File is a 1965 film adaptation of Len Deightons novel the The IPCRESS File. ... Jack the Ripper is the pseudonym given to an unidentified serial killer active in the largely impoverished Whitechapel area of London, England in the second half of 1888. ... Austin Powers in Goldmember is a 2002 comedy film. ... Alfie is a 1966 film starring Michael Caine. ... Philip Daniels (born October 25, 1958 in Islington, London) is an English actor. ... Parklife is a critically acclaimed Britpop album by the band Blur, released on April 25, 1994. ... Don Cheadle (born November 29, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor. ... Oceans Eleven is a 2001 remake of the 1960 Rat Pack caper film Oceans Eleven. ... Harry H. Corbett on the right with Hercules the horse. ... Wilfrid Brambell (born March 22, 1912 in Dublin, Ireland; died January 18, 1985 in London, England, UK) was an Irish film and television actor, best known for his roles in the British television series Steptoe and Son and The Beatles film A Hard Days Night. ... Steptoe and Son is a British sitcom written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson about two rag and bone men living in Oil Drum Lane, a fictional street in Shepherds Bush, London. ... Arthur English (May 9, 1919 – April 16, 1995) was a British comedian from the music hall tradition. ... Wendy Richard MBE (born Wendy Emerton on 20 July 1943) is a popular English actress best known for playing Miss Brahms in Are You Being Served? from 1972 to 1985 and Pauline Fowler in EastEnders from 1985 to 2006. ... Are You Being Served? was a long-running British sitcom broadcast from 1972 to 1985. ... Gary Holton (22 September 1952 - 25 October 1985) was an English actor and musician from London. ... Auf Wiedersehen, Pet is a popular British comedy-drama series about a group of seven British migrant construction workers: Wayne, Dennis, Oz, Bomber, Barry, Neville and Moxey, who are living and working on a German building site. ... Robert William Bob Hoskins Jr. ... The Long Good Friday (1980) is a British gangster film starring Bob Hoskins and Helen Mirren. ... Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is a British comedian, actor, author and writer of comedic songs. ... The 1991 reissue of Always Look on the Bright Side of Life Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life is a popular song written by Eric Idle which originally featured in the 1979 film Monty Pythons Life of Brian and has gone on to become a common singalong... Life of Brian is a film from 1979 by Monty Python which deals with the life of Brian (played by Graham Chapman), a young man born at the nearly the same time as, and in a manger right down the street from Jesus. ... Sir David Jason, OBE (born February 2, 1940) is a highly regarded English actor, admired equally for his dramatic work as for his comedy roles. ... Derek Reginald Trotter (born July 12, 1948 in Deptford),[1] more commonly known as Del Boy, is the lead character in the popular BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses. ... Only Fools and Horses is a British television sitcom, created and written by John Sullivan, and made and broadcast by the BBC. Seven series were originally broadcast in the UK between 1981 and 1991, with sporadic Christmas specials until 2003. ... South London area South London (known colloquially as South of the River) is the area of London south of the River Thames. ... A Londoner is someone who inhabits or originates from London. ... Sir Ben Kingsley, CBE, (born December 31, 1943) is a British actor. ... Sexy Beast (2001) is a British film directed by Jonathan Glazer, starring Ray Winstone, Ben Kingsley and Ian McShane. ... Juliet Landau (born March 30, 1965) is an American actress. ... Drusilla (born circa 1840 in London, England) is a fictional character created by Joss Whedon for the cult television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel. ... For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... Angel is a spin-off of the American television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ... James Wesley Marsters (born August 20, 1962) is an American actor and musician, best known for playing the popular platinum-blond character Spike, an English of a vampire, in the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and its spinoff series Angel. ... Spike (aka William The Bloody) is a fictional character created by Joss Whedon for the cult television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel. ... For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... Angel is a spin-off of the American television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ... Tress MacNeille (born June 20, 1951) is an American voice actress best known for providing various voices on the animated television shows The Simpsons and Futurama, and Animaniacs. ... A Rough Collie Collie refers to various breeds of herding dog originating primarily in Scotland. ... This entire article, especially the controversy section and the discussion of its cancellation does not cite any references or sources. ... Warren Mitchell (born 14 January 1926) is an English actor. ... Alf Garnett was a fictional character on the BBC television sitcom Till Death Us Do Part, the ITV sitcom Till Death. ... Til Death Us Do Part (also known as Till Death Us do Part)1 was a BBC television sitcom series written by Johnny Speight that ran from 1966 until 1975. ... Richard Wayne Dick Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an Emmy-Award winning American actor of film, stage, and screen, comedian and dancer. ... For the 2004 stage musical, see Mary Poppins (musical). ... Simon Nash is a British actor who provided the voice of Ten Cents in the 80s childrens series TUGS, he also appeared in the English sitcom Birds of a Feather. ... Ten Cents Ten Cents is a fictional character who appeared in the 1988 television series TUGS, created by the producers of Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends. ... Childrens television series are television programmes designed for and marketed to children, normally aired during the morning and afternoon hours, mainly before and after school. ... This article is about childrens television series. ... This article is about the actress. ... Information Nickname(s) Nan Portrayed by Catherine Tate Created by Catherine Tate/Derren Litten Joannie Nan Taylor is a fictional character in The Catherine Tate Show. ... The Catherine Tate Show is an award-winning British television sketch comedy written by Catherine Tate who stars in all of the shows sketches, which feature a wide range of characters. ... Jessie Wallace (born Karen Wallace on September 25, 1971) is a British actress who trained at the The Poor School. ... Kat in her first year. ... EastEnders is a popular BBC television soap opera, first broadcast in the United Kingdom on BBC1 on 19 February 1985[4] and continuing to date. ... Dennis in The Sweeney For the character in Little Britain, see Dennis Waterman (Little Britain). ... George Cole as Arthur Daley in Minder (book cover) George Cole (born April 22, 1925 in Tooting, London, England) is a British actor. ... Minder was a British comedy-drama about the London criminal underworld. ... Raymond Andrew Winstone (born February 19, 1957) is an Emmy Award winning English film and television actor. ... Scum is a film made in 1979 portraying the brutality of life inside a British borstal. ... Nil by Mouth (or NBM) can mean: The British translation of the medical instruction nil per os (NPO) for patients who may not take any substances orally for various reasons Nil by Mouth, a sectarian charity in Glasgow, Scotland Nil by Mouth, a 1997 British film Nil By Mouth, a... Sexy Beast (2001) is a British film directed by Jonathan Glazer, starring Ray Winstone, Ben Kingsley and Ian McShane. ... Henry VIII was a 2003 ITV drama based on the life of Henry VIII of England. ... Flushed Away is a computer animated British film directed by David Bowers and Sam Fell. ... Christian Charles Philip Bale (also known professionally as Christian Morgan Bale; born 30 January 1974) is a British[2][3] method actor who is known for his roles in the films American Psycho, Shaft, Equilibrium, The Machinist, Batman Begins and The Prestige, among others. ... The Prestige is a 2006 period film directed by Christopher Nolan, with a screenplay adapted from the 1995 World Fantasy Award-winning novel of the same name by Christopher Priest. ...

See also

British English (BrE, BE, en-GB) is the broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere in the Anglophone world. ... Cockney rhyming slang is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ... Estuary English is a name given to the form of English widely spoken in South East England, especially along the river Thames and its estuary. ... The United Kingdom has no official language. ... London slang is a mixture of words and phrases from many sources, reflecting the diverse ethnic and cultural makeup of the citys population. ... In linguistics, l-vocalization is a process by which an sound (a lateral consonant) is replaced by a vowel or semivowel sound. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ...

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ [3]
  4. ^ [4]
  5. ^ [5]
  6. ^ British Library
  7. ^ [6]
  8. ^ [7]
  9. ^ (Sivertsen 1960, p. 111)
  10. ^ (Hughs & Trudgill 1979, pp. 34)
  11. ^ (Sivertsen 1960, p. 109)
  12. ^ (Sivertsen 1960, p. 124)
  13. ^ (Hughs& Trudgill 1979, pp. 39-41)
  14. ^ (Hughs & Trudgill 1979, p. 35)
  15. ^ (Hughs & Trudgill 1938, p. 35)
  16. ^ (Matthews 1938, p. 35)
  17. ^ (Matthews 1938, p. 78)
  18. ^ (Matthews 1938, p. 78)
  19. ^ (Sivertsen 1960, p. 132)
  20. ^ Linguistics 110 Linguistic Analysis: Sentences & Dialects, Lecture Number Twenty One — Regional English Dialects English Dialects of the World

Bibliography

  • Hughes, Arthur (1979). English Accents and Dialects: An Introduction to Social and Regional Varities of British English. University Park Press. 
  • Matthews, William (1938). Cockney, Past and Present: a Short History of the Dialect of London. Gale Research Company. 
  • Sivertsen, Eva (1960). Cockney Phonology. University of Oslo. 

External links

  • Grose's 1811 dictionary
  • Whoohoo Cockney Rhyming Slang translator
  • Sounds Familiar? — Listen to examples of London and other regional accents and dialects of the UK on the British Library's 'Sounds Familiar' website
  • A Short Video of Cockney Speech

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cockney English (860 words)
Cockney is characterized by its own special vocabulary and usage, and traditionally by its own development of "rhyming slang." Rhyming slang, is still part of the true Cockney culture even if it is sometimes used for effect.
It is generally agreed, that to be a true Cockney, a person has to be born within hearing distance of the bells of St. Mary le Bow, Cheapside, in the City of London.
The Cockney accent is generally considered one of the broadest of the British accents and is heavily stimatized.
Cockney - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1885 words)
Cockneys are, in the present-day sense of the word, white working-class inhabitants of London.
Cockney culture is a culture of small communities and large extended families - mum and dad, brothers and sisters, grandparents, aunts and uncles, cousins - several generations often under the same roof or living on the same street.
Cockney speakers have a distinctive accent and dialect, and frequently use Cockney rhyming slang.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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