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Encyclopedia > Cockatrice
Cockatrice

A cockatrice is a legendary creature, "an ornament in the drama and poetry of the Elizabethans" (Breiner). The cockatrice was invented in the late twelfth century based on a hint in Pliny's Natural History, as a duplicate of the basilisk or regulus, in appearance resembling a giant rooster, with a lizard-like tail. It was supposed to be born from an egg laid by a cock[1] and incubated by a toad. Attempts to identify it with any particular biological species, often of snakes, have proved generally futile and it is generally considered a bogey of the wasteland. Image File history File links Cockatrice. ... Image File history File links Cockatrice. ... A legendary creature is a mythological or folkloric creature (often known as fabulous creatures in historical literature). ... Naturalis Historia Pliny the Elders Natural History is an encyclopedia written by Pliny the Elder. ... Woodblock print of a basilisk from Ulisse Aldrovandi, Monstrorum historia, 1642 Cityseal of Zwolle from 1295 with Saint-Michael killing a basilisk In European bestiaries and legends, a basilisk (from the Greek βασιλίσκος basiliskos, a little king, in Latin Regulus) is a legendary reptile reputed to be king of serpents and... Rooster crowing during daylight A Rhode Island Red. ... Rooster in grass, demonstrating the alert stance before sounding an alarm A cock or rooster is a male chicken, the female being a hen. ... The bogeyman, boogyman, bogyman, or boogeyman, is a legendary ghostlike monster often believed in by children. ...


Its reputed magical abilities include turning people to stone or killing them by either looking at them—"the death-darting eye of Cockatrice"[2]—touching them, or sometimes breathing on them. The cockatrice is very similar (if not identical) to another legendary creature, the basilisk; the Jewish Encyclopedia (1906) considers them identical. Woodblock print of a basilisk from Ulisse Aldrovandi, Monstrorum historia, 1642 Cityseal of Zwolle from 1295 with Saint-Michael killing a basilisk In European bestiaries and legends, a basilisk (from the Greek βασιλίσκος basiliskos, a little king, in Latin Regulus) is a legendary reptile reputed to be king of serpents and...


It is said in the medieval bestiaries that the weasel is the only animal that is immune to the glance of a cockatrice. It was also thought that a cockatrice would die instantly upon hearing a rooster crow. According to legend, having a cockatrice look itself in a mirror is one of the few sure-fire ways to kill it. The cockatrice was also able to fly with the set of wings affixed to its back. A bestiary is a medieval book that has short descriptions of various real or imaginary animals, birds and even rocks. ... It has been suggested that boogle be merged into this article or section. ...


Like the head of Medusa, the cockatrice's powers of petrification were thought still effective after death. A relatively modern image of Medusa painted by Arnold Böcklin In Greek mythology, Medusa (Μεδουσα Queen), was a monstrous female character whose gaze could turn people to stone. ... In geology, petrifaction or petrification is the process by which organic material is converted into stone or a similar substance. ...


The widespread and long-standing perception[3] that there is a connection with crocodile is not supported by OED which gives a derivation from Old French cocatris, from medieval Latin calcatrix, or caucatrix, used to render Greek ichneumon Genera Mecistops Crocodylus Osteolaemus See full taxonomy. ... OED stands for Oxford English Dictionary Office of Enrollment & Discipline This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The name Ichneumon can refer to different things: The Ichneumon wasp Herpestes ichneumon[1], the Egyptian Mongoose a mythological creature said to cover themselves in mud and kill dragons This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


In England the town most associated with the Cockatrice is the village of Wherwell, near Andover in Hampshire. The story is that the Cockatrice terrorised the village until it was imprisoned in the dungeons below Wherwell Priory. A prize of land was offered to anyone who could kill the creature. None was successful, until a man named Green lowered a mirror into the dungeon. The Cockatrice battled against its own reflection until exhausted, at which point Green was able to kill it. Today there is an area of land near Wherwell called Green's Acres. For many years a weather vane in the shape of a Cockatrice adorned the church of St. Peter and Holy Cross in Wherwell until it was removed to Andover Museum. Wherwell is a village in Hampshire, England. ... Statistics Population: 52,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SU3645 Administration District: Test Valley Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Hampshire Historic county: Hampshire Services Police force: Hampshire Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Central Post office and telephone Post town... Hampshire, sometimes historically Southamptonshire or Hamptonshire, (abbr. ... Weather vane Weather cock Aerovane A weather vane, also called a wind vane, is a movable device attached to an elevated object such as a roof for showing the direction of the wind. ...


In the King James Version of the Old Testament cockatrice is used several times, to translate Hebrew tziph'oni: This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ...

A cockatrice overdoor at Belvedere Castle in New York's Central Park

Isaiah 11:8 And the sucking child shall play on the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put his hand on the cockatrice' den. Cockatrice as architectural embelishment, part of a transom over a doorway. ... Cockatrice as architectural embelishment, part of a transom over a doorway. ... Belvedere Castle Belvedere Castle sits upon Vista Rock in Central Park, New York City. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres or 3. ...

Isaiah 14:29 Rejoice not thou, whole Palestina, because the rod of him that smote thee is broken: for out of the serpent's root shall come forth a cockatrice, and his fruit shall be a fiery flying serpent.

Isaiah 59:5 They hatch cockatrice' eggs, and weave the spider's web: he that eateth of their eggs dieth, and that which is crushed breaketh out into a viper.

Jeremiah 8:17 For, behold, I will send serpents, cockatrices, among you, which will not be charmed, and they shall bite you, saith the LORD.

In all these instances, the Revised Version renders the word "basilisk", and the New International Version translates it as "viper". In Proverbs 23:32 the similar Hebrew tzeph'a is rendered "adder", both in the Authorized Version and the Revised Version. The Revised Version (or English Revised Version) of the Bible is a late 19th-century British revision of the King James Version of 1611. ... Woodblock print of a basilisk from Ulisse Aldrovandi, Monstrorum historia, 1642 Cityseal of Zwolle from 1295 with Saint-Michael killing a basilisk In European bestiaries and legends, a basilisk (from the Greek βασιλίσκος basiliskos, a little king, in Latin Regulus) is a legendary reptile reputed to be king of serpents and... The New International Version (NIV) is an English translation of the Christian Bible which is the most popular of the modern translations of the Bible made in the twentieth century. ... A viper is a venomous snake belonging to the Viperidae family. ...


Laurence Breiner identified the uses of the cockatrice in alchemy (Breiner1979). This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...

Contents

Cockatrice in the modern world

The cockatrice is the heraldic symbol of 3 (Fighter) Squadron, a Fighter squadron of The Royal Air Force. No. ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ...

Squadron Crest
Squadron Crest

This image is Crown copyright protected. ... This image is Crown copyright protected. ...

Cockatrice in modern fantasy fiction and games

The cockatrice has provided magical or neo-medieval colour for much fantasy fiction, "dungeons and dragons" role-playing games and commercial entertainment. For average people, these provide the main encounters with the cockatrice. They are also a slightly common enemy in some Final Fantasy games, which, when they attack, have a chance to cause the "Stone" ailment to your character. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other definitions of fantasy see fantasy (psychology). ... The original Dungeons & Dragons set Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&D or DnD) is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) published by Gary Gygax and David Arneson in January 1974. ...


Analogous creatures

  • Chickatrice – a fantasy animal in some ‘dungeons and dragons’ type games. Occurs in Ye Olde Nethack Bestiary [4], where according to the properties stated, it is unlikely to be a female cockatrice as it does not lay eggs, but it could be a juvenile.

The original Dungeons & Dragons set Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&D or DnD) is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) published by Gary Gygax and David Arneson in January 1974. ... This article is about the role-playing game. ... John Francis Alexander Heath-Stubbs (born 9 July 1918) is a British poet and translator, known for his verse influenced by classical myths, and the long Arthurian poem Artorius (1972). ...

Notes

  1. ^ This impossibility is at the root of the originally pejorative term "Cockney" ("cock's egg") for a Londoner.
  2. ^ Romeo and Juliet, iii.ii.47. The idea of vision in an "eye-beam", a stream emanating from the eye was inherited by the Renaissance from Antiquity; it forms an elaborately-worked-out simile in John Donne's "The Exstacie": "Our eye-beames twisted and did thred/ Our eyes, upon one double string."
  3. ^ OED notes a sixteenth-century association of cockatrice with crocodile.
  4. ^ [1] Chickatrice in Ye Olde Nethack Bestiary
  5. ^ John Heath-Stubbs Pigs might fly, Carcanet, ISBN 1 857548 19 1

St Mary-le-Bow The term cockney refers to working-class inhabitants of London, particularly east London, and the slang used by these people. ... Romeo and Juliet in the famous balcony scene by Ford Madox Brown For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... “Ancient” redirects here. ... For the Welsh courtier and diplomat, see Sir John Donne. ...

References

  • ChristianAnswers.com: "Cockatrice"
  • The Medieval Bestiary: "Basilisk" (includes Cockatrice)

Further reading

  • Laurence A. Breiner, "The Career of the Cockatrice", Isis 70:1 (March 1979), pp 30-47
  • P. Ansell Robin, "The Cockatrice and the 'New English Dictionary'", in Animal Lore in English Literature (London 1932).

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cockatrice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1312 words)
A cockatrice is a legendary creature, "an ornament in the drama and poetry of the Elizabethans" (Breiner).
The cockatrice was invented in the late twelfth century based on a hint in Pliny's Natural History, as a duplicate of the basilisk or regulus, in appearance resembling a giant rooster, with a lizard-like tail.
It was supposed to be born from an egg laid by a cock
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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