FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Coat of arms of Denmark

The National Coat of Arms of Denmark consists of three crowned blue lions accompanied by nine red hearts, all in a golden shield. The oldest known depiction of the insignia dates from a seal used by King Canute VI c. 1194. The oldest documentation for the colours dates from c. 1270.[1] Historically, the lions faced the viewer and the number of hearts was not regulated and could be much higher. Historians believe that the hearts originally were søblade (literally: sea-leaves) but that this meaning was lost early due to worn and crudely made signets used during the Middle Ages. A royal decree of 1972 specifies these figures as søblade but Danes normally refer to them as hearts. The current version was adopted in 1819 during the reign of King Frederick VI who fixed the number of hearts to nine and decreed that the heraldic beasts were lions, consequently facing forward. A rare version exists from the reign of king Eric of Pomerania in which the three lions jointly hold the Danish banner, in a similar fashion as in the coat of arms of the former South Jutland County. Until c. 1960, Denmark used both a "small" and a "large" coat of arms, similar to the system still used in Sweden. The latter symbol held wide use within the government administration, e.g. by the Foreign Ministry. Since this time, the latter symbol has been classified as the coat of arms of the royal family, leaving Denmark with only one national coat of arms, used for all official purposes. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The winged lion of Mark the Evangelist for centuries has been the national emblem and landmark of Venice (detail from a painting by Vittore Carpaccio, 1516) The lion is a common charge in heraldry. ... This article is about the authentication means. ... Canute IV (1163-1202), also called Canute VI because the two prior kings Harthacanute were counted under the name Canute in older Lists of Rulers, was King of Denmark (1182-1202). ... Events November 20 - Palermo falls to Henry VI, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire December 25 - Henry VI is crowned king of Sicily. ... The cathedral atop the Rock of Cashel in Ireland was completed in 1270. ... Species About 50 species, including: Nymphaea alba- European White Water-lily Nymphaea amazonium Nymphaea ampla Nymphaea blanda Nymphaea caerulea- Egyptian Blue Water-lily Nymphaea calliantha Nymphaea candida Nymphaea capensis- Cape Blue Water-lily Nymphaea citrina Nymphaea colorata Nymphaea elegans Nymphaea fennica Nymphaea flavovirens Nymphaea gardneriana Nymphaea gigantea- Australian Water-lily... This article is about the authentication means. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... King Frederick VI. King Frederick VI of Denmark and Norway (January 28, 1768 – December 3, 1839), reigned as King of Denmark from 1808 to 1839, and as king of Norway from 1808 to 1814. ... Eric of Pomerania A caricature of the king, the only contemporary likeness of him in existence Eric of Pomerania, Erik af Pommern, Erik VII (Danish title), Erik av Pommern (Eirik III) (Norwegian title) Erik av Pommern (Eric XIII) (Swedish title) or Eryk Pomorski (Polish title), was adopted by Margaret I... The Dannebrog. ... Sønderjyllands Amt (English: South Jutland County) is a county (Danish, amt) on the Jutland peninsula in southern Denmark. ... Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark (Danish: Udenrigsministeriet) handles Denmarks foreign affairs. ...


The crown on the shield is a heraldic construction based on the crown of King Christian V, not to be confused with the crown of King Christian IV. The main difference from the real crown is that the latter is covered with table cut diamonds rather than pearls. Both crowns, and other royal insignia, are located in Rosenborg Castle in Copenhagen. Christian V (April 14, 1646 in Flensburg - August 25, 1699 in Copenhagen), was king of Denmark and Norway from 1670-1699. ... The coronation of King Christian IV, painted by Otto Bache, 1887. ... This article is about the gemstone. ... Rosenborg castle is a small castle situated in the centre of the Danish capital, Copenhagen. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ...


The blazon in heraldic terms is: Or, three lions passant in pale Azure crowned and armed Or langued Gules, nine hearts Gules. This is an article about Heraldry. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ...

The earliest known example of the Danish arms, the seal of Canute VI, 1190s. The only known copy of this insignia was discovered in 1879 in the Grand Ducal archive of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany. Note the king's closed crown which differs from the open crowns shown on the seals of his successors.
The earliest known example of the Danish arms, the seal of Canute VI, 1190s. The only known copy of this insignia was discovered in 1879 in the Grand Ducal archive of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany. Note the king's closed crown which differs from the open crowns shown on the seals of his successors.[2]
A medieval ship flag captured by forces from Lübeck in the 1420s showed the arms of Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Pomerania. The original flag was destroyed during a World War II attack on the city, but a 19th century copy remains in Frederiksborg Palace, Denmark. The saint accompanying the Virgin Mary and infant Christ is Saint James the Greater, identified by his scallop shell emblem.
A medieval ship flag captured by forces from Lübeck in the 1420s showed the arms of Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Pomerania. The original flag was destroyed during a World War II attack on the city, but a 19th century copy remains in Frederiksborg Palace, Denmark. The saint accompanying the Virgin Mary and infant Christ is Saint James the Greater, identified by his scallop shell emblem.

This insignia is almost identical to the coats of arms of Estonia and Tallinn which can both be traced directly back to King Valdemar II and the Danish rule in northern Estonia 1219-1346. The main differences are as follows: In the Danish coat of arms the lions are crowned, face forward, and accompanied by nine hearts. In the Estonian coat of arms, the "leopards" face the viewer, they are not crowned, and no hearts are present. The coat of arms of Tallinn resembles the Estonian arms, but the leopards in the former arms are crowned with golden crowns[3] similar to the ones in the Danish arms. It shows great similarities with the contemporary insignia of England's Richard the Lionheart and the current arms of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. The Danish coat of arms has also been the inspiration for the coat of arms of the former Duchy of Schleswig, a former Danish province (two blue lions in a golden shield.) The hearts of the coat of arms also appear in the coat of arms of the German district of Lüneburg. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 433 pixelsFull resolution (1956 × 1059 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 433 pixelsFull resolution (1956 × 1059 pixel, file size: 1. ... Canute IV (1163-1202), also called Canute VI because the two prior kings Harthacanute were counted under the name Canute in older Lists of Rulers, was King of Denmark (1182-1202). ... Mecklenburg-Schwerin was a Duchy (from 1815 a Grand Duchy) in northeastern Germany, formed by a partition of the Duchy of Mecklenburg. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 269 pixelsFull resolution (2951 × 991 pixel, file size: 6. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 269 pixelsFull resolution (2951 × 991 pixel, file size: 6. ... For other uses, see Lübeck (disambiguation). ... Frederiksborg Palace Frederiksborg Palace, in Hillerød, was built as a royal residence for King Christian IV from 1602 to 1620 by the Dutch architects Hans and Lorents van Steenwinckel. ... Saint James, son of Zebedee (d. ... Genera See text. ... Image File history File links FIAV_historical. ... Image File history File links FIAV_000001. ... The Greater Coat of Arms The Lesser Coat of Arms Coat of Arms of Estonia. ... County Area 159. ... Valdemar II (1170–1241), called Valdemar the Conqueror or Valdemar the Victorious, was the King of Denmark from 1202 until 1241. ... Estonia was a dominion of Denmark during Middle Ages. ... // Events Saint Francis of Assisi introduces Catholicism into Egypt, during the Fifth Crusade The Flag of Denmark fell from the sky during the Battle of Lyndanisse Ongoing events Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Births Christopher I of Denmark (died 1259) Frederick II of Austria (died 1246) Guillaume de Gisors, supposedly the... // Events Serbian Empire was proclaimed in Skopje by Dusan Silni, occupying much of the South-Eastern Europe Foundation of the University of Valladolid Foundation of Pembroke College, University of Cambridge August 26 Battle of Crecy after which Edward the Black Prince honored the bravery of John I, Count of Luxemburg... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 to 6 April 1199. ... Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE1 Capital Stuttgart Minister-President Günther Oettinger (CDU) Governing parties CDU / FDP Votes in Bundesrat 6 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  35,752 km² (13,804 sq mi) Population 10,741,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density... The first known example of the insignia: the seal of Erik Abelsøn, Duke of Schleswig (d. ... This article is about the region of Schleswig on the German/Danish border. ... Lüneburg is a district in Lower Saxony, Germany. ...

Contents

Royal coat of arms

Arms of the Danish royal family. The version shown here has been used since 1972.
The Danish arms in the Gelre Armorial, 14th century. This is the oldest coloured image of the Dannebrog. The crest was used by Danish monarchs from the 13th century until c. 1420. The flag is not part of the crest.
The Danish arms in the Gelre Armorial, 14th century. This is the oldest coloured image of the Dannebrog. The crest was used by Danish monarchs from the 13th century until c. 1420.[1] The flag is not part of the crest.

The royal coat of arms is more complex.[4] The shield is quartered by a silver cross fimbriated in red, derived from the Danish flag, the Dannebrog. The first and fourth quarters represent Denmark by three crowned lions passant accompanied by nine hearts; the second quarter contains two lions passant representing Schleswig, a former Danish province now divided between Denmark and Germany, the third quarter contains a total of three symbols. The three golden crowns on blue are officially interpreted as a symbol of the former Kalmar Union. This symbol is identical to the coat of arms of Sweden and originally represented a Danish claim to the Swedish crown. The silver ram on blue represents the Faroe Islands and the similarly coloured polar bear represents Greenland. The current version of the arms, established by royal decree 5 July 1972[4], is greatly simplified from the previous version which contained seven additional sub-coats representing five territories formerly ruled by the Danish kings and two medieval titles: Holstein, Stormarn, Dithmarschen, Lauenburg, Delmenhorst, and King of the Wends and Goths. A crowned silver stockfish on red was formerly included to represent Iceland, but due to Icelandic opposition, this symbol was replaced in 1903 by a silver falcon on blue. The falcon was in turn removed from the royal arms in 1948 following the death of King Christian X in 1947 and reflecting the 1944 breakup of the Dano-Icelandic union. Image File history File links Denmark_large_coa. ... Image File history File links Denmark_large_coa. ... Download high resolution version (992x1480, 346 KB)Page 55 verso in the Dutch book Wapenboek Gelre, written between 1340-1370 (some sources say 1378 or 1386), by Geldre Claes Heinen. ... Download high resolution version (992x1480, 346 KB)Page 55 verso in the Dutch book Wapenboek Gelre, written between 1340-1370 (some sources say 1378 or 1386), by Geldre Claes Heinen. ... The Dannebrog. ... In heraldry, a crest is a component of a coat of arms. ... The Dannebrog. ... The first known example of the insignia: the seal of Erik Abelsøn, Duke of Schleswig (d. ... The region of Schleswig (former English name: Sleswick, Danish: Sønderjylland or Slesvig, Low German: Sleswig, North Frisian: Slaswik or Sleesweg) covers the area about 60 km north and 70 km south of the border between Germany and Denmark. ... The Kalmar Union flag. ... The greater national coat of arms (stora riksvapnet) and the lesser national coat of arms (lilla riksvapnet) are the official coats of arms of Sweden. ... Binomial name Ovis aries Linnaeus, 1758 A sheep is any of several woolly ruminant quadrupeds, but most commonly the Domestic Sheep (Ovis aries), which probably descends from the wild moufflon of south-central and south-west Asia. ... This article is about the animal. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... Stormarn is a district in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... Dithmarschen is a district in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... The Coat of Arms of Lauenburg The Duchy of Lauenburg, also known as Saxe-Lauenburg was a medieval Duchy (Reichsfreiheit) that existed from 1296 in the extreme southeast region of Schleswig-Holstein with its territorial center in the modern district of Lauenburg. ... Delmenhorst is an urban district (Kreisfreie Stadt) in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... The title of King of the Wends denoted sovereignty or claims over Slavic lands of southern coasts of the Baltic Sea, those otherwise called Mecklenburg, Holstein and Pomerania, and was from 12th century used by Kings of Denmark and from 16th century by Kings of Sweden. ... The title of King of the Goths was for many centuries borne by both the Kings of Sweden and the Kings of Denmark, denoting sovereignty or claimed sovereignty over the antique people of the Goths, which is sort of poetic explanation. ... Stockfish is air-dried cod. ... Falcons eat humans. ... Christian X of Denmark (Christian Carl Frederik Albert Alexander Vilhelm) (September 26, 1870 – April 20, 1947) was King of Denmark from 1912 to 1947 and of Iceland between 1918 and 1944. ...


The centre escutcheon, two red bars on a golden shield, represents Oldenburg; the ancestral home of the former royal dynasty that ruled Denmark and Norway since the middle of the fifteenth century. When the senior branch of this dynasty became extinct in 1863, the crown passed to Prince Christian of the cadet branch Glücksburg, whose descendents have reigned in Denmark ever since. The House of Glücksburg continues the use of the arms of the old Oldenburg dynasty, and the symbol is still officially referred to by its old association. Shield Field Supporter Crest Wreath Mantling Helm Compartment Charge Motto Coat of arms elements Escutcheon is often the term used in heraldry for the shield displayed in a coat of arms. ... Oldenburg (Low German: Ollnborg) is an Independent City in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... The House of Oldenburg is a North German noble family and one of Europes most influential Royal Houses. ... The Kingdom of Denmark-Norway, consisting of Denmark and Norway, including Norways possessions Iceland, Greenland and the Faroe Islands, is a term used for the two united kingdoms after their amalgamation as one state in 1536. ... Christian IX of Denmark (April 8, 1818 – January 29, 1906) was King of Denmark from November 15, 1863 to January 29, 1906. ... Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (in Danish: Slesvig-Holsten-Sønderborg-Lyksborg (or Glücksborg)), from Glücksburg in northernmost Germany, is a line of the House of Oldenburg (Danish: Oldenborg), to which the royal houses of Denmark, Norway, and the former royal house of Greece belong. ...


Two woodwoses (vildmænd) act as supporters, and this element can be traced back to the early reign of the Oldenburg dynasty. Similar supporters were used in the former arms of Prussia. The shield features the insignias of the Order of the Dannebrog and the Order of the Elephant around it. Woodwoses support coats of arms in the side panels of a portrait by Albrecht Dürer, 1499 (Alte Pinakothek, Munich) Grand arms of Prussia, 1873 The Woodwose or hairy wildman of the woods was the Sasquatch figure of pre-Christian Gaul, in Anglo-Saxon a Woodwoses appear in the carved... The Coat of Arms of Prince Edward Island uses two foxes as supporters. ... This article is about the coat of arms of the former German state of Prussia. ... The Order of the Dannebrog is an Order of Denmark, instituted in 1671. ... Coat of arms of Frederick IV of Denmark and Norway surrounded by the collars of the Order of the Elephant and the Order of the Dannebrog. ...


The shield and supporters are framed by a royal ermine robe, surmounted by a royal crown. The ermine (Mustela erminea) is a dark brown weasel, with a distinctive black-tipped tail. ... A dragon robe from Qing Dynasty of China A robe is a loose-fitting outer garment. ...


A blazon in heraldic terms is: A shield quartered by a cross Argent fimbriated Gules, first and fourth quarter Or, three lions passant in pale Azure crowned and armed Or langued Gules, nine hearts Gules (for Denmark); second quarter Or, two lions passant in pale Azure armed Or langued Gules (for Schleswig); third quarter Azure, party per fess, in base per pale; in chief three crowns Or (for the Kalmar Union), in dexter base a ram passant Argent armed and unguled Or (for the Faroe Islands), in sinister base a polar bear rampant Argent (for Greenland). Overall an escutcheon Or two bars Gules (for Oldenburg) the whole surrounded by the Collars of the Order of the Dannebrog and the Order of the Elephant. Supporters two woodwoses armed with clubs Proper standing on a pedestal. All surrounded by a mantle Gules doubled Ermine crowned with a royal crown and tied up with tasseled strings Or.


The royal coat of arms has since c. 1960 been reserved exclusively for use by the Monarch, the royal family, the Royal Guards and the royal court according to royal decree. A select number of purveyors to the Danish royal family are also allowed to use the royal insignia. The Danish Royal Family includes The Queen of Denmark and her family. ... Royal court (as distinguished from a court of law) may refer to a number of institutions: A noble court - the household or entourage of a monarch or other ruler The Royal Court of Jersey - the main court of justice of Jersey The Royal Court of Guernsey - the main court of... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Territories and titles formerly represented in the Danish arms

Coat of arms of Frederick IV of Denmark and Norway, from the Long Hall of Rosenborg Castle.
Coat of arms of Frederick IV of Denmark and Norway, from the Long Hall of Rosenborg Castle.
Coat of arms from Trinity Church, Copenhagen.
Coat of arms from Trinity Church, Copenhagen.

The following list is based on the research by Danish heraldist, Erling Svane.[5] Danish names are shown in italics. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 510 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1744 × 2048 pixel, file size: 307 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 510 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1744 × 2048 pixel, file size: 307 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Frederick IV Frederick IV (October 11, 1671 - October 12, 1730) king of Denmark and Norway from 1699. ... Rosenborg castle is a small castle situated in the centre of the Danish capital, Copenhagen. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 562 pixelsFull resolution (3150 × 2214 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 562 pixelsFull resolution (3150 × 2214 pixel, file size: 2. ...

  • Norway (Norge): 1398 - c. 1819: on red, a crowned golden lion carrying a golden axe with a silver blade. The union with Norway was dissolved in 1814 as a result of the Napoleonic Wars.
  • Sweden (Sverige): 1398 - the Folkung lion, the arms of Sweden until 1364. Only used during the reign of Eric of Pomerania.
  • Pomerania (Pommern): 1398 - a red griffin on silver. Only used during the reign of Eric of Pomerania.
  • Bavaria (Bayern): 1440 - lozengy blue/white. Only used during the reign of Christopher of Bavaria.
  • Palatinate (Pfalz): 1440 - a crowned golden lion on black. Only used during the reign of Christopher of Bavaria.
  • King of the Wends (Vendernes Konge): 1440 - 1972: a crowned golden lindorm on red. Canute VI proclaimed himself Rex Sclavorum (King of Slavs). From the reign of Valdemar IV this title was known as King of the Wends. This symbol was later also interpreted as the coat of arms of Funen[6] and appeared in the official insignia of the now-defunct army regiment Fynske Livregiment. It should not be confused with the similar insignia of Bornholm, also formerly included in the Danish arms.
  • King of the Goths (Gothernes Konge): 1449 - 1972: in gold, a blue lion passant over nine red hearts arranged 4, 3, 2. Originally a leopard. Derived from the arms of Denmark and originally the arms of the Dukes of Halland. The lion is almost never crowned. This symbol was later also interpreted as the coat of arms of Jutland. It appears on the stern of the 19th century frigate Jylland and in the official insignia of the army regiment Jydske Dragonregiment.
  • Holstein (Holsten): 1440 - 1972: on red, a silver nettle leaf; sometimes seen as a silver shield with a red indented bordure.
  • Stormarn (Stormarn): 1496 - 1972: on red, a silver swan with a golden crown around its neck.
  • Delmenhorst (Delmenhorst): 1531 - 1972: on blue, a golden cross.
  • Dithmarschen (Ditmarsken): 1563 - 1972: on red, a knight dressed in golden armor on a silver horse. On his arm, an oval blue shield with a golden cross. Frederick II conquered Dithmarschen in 1559.
  • Iceland (Island): 16th century - 1903: on red, a crowned silver stockfish. The symbol had been associated with Iceland from the early sixteenth century. First included in the arms of Frederick II. 1903 - 1947: a silver falcon on blue. Iceland dissolved the union with Denmark in 1944, and when King Christian X died in 1947, the new King Frederick IX decided to remove the falcon from his arms. It does, however, appear on the front page of Hof- og Statskalenderen's 1948-49 edition.
  • Gotland (Gotland): on red, a silver Agnus Dei. First included by King Frederick II. Last used during the reign of King Frederick VI.
  • Saaremaa (Øsel): from 1603, last used by King Frederick VI: on blue a black eagle. Several historians have explained this violation of the heraldic rule of tincture as the black colour being the result of an oxidation of white paint containing lead.[7]
  • Fehmarn (Femern): from 1666, last used by King Frederick VI: on blue, a golden crown.
  • Bornholm (Bornholm): from c. 1665, last used by King Frederick VI: on red, a golden four-legged dragon.
  • Lauenburg (Lauenborg): 1819 - 1972: on red, a golden horse's head. Derived from the German Sachsenross arms which shows a silver horse on red.

Coat of arms of Folkung family In modern Swedish, Folkung has two meanings, which appear to be opposites: The noble (royal) clan of some Folkungar, later named Folkungaätten (ätt means clan), who in effect introduced inheritance of the throne during the 12th century. ... Eric of Pomerania A caricature of the king, the only contemporary likeness of him in existence Eric of Pomerania, Erik af Pommern, Erik VII (Danish title), Erik av Pommern (Eirik III) (Norwegian title) Erik av Pommern (Eric XIII) (Swedish title) or Eryk Pomorski (Polish title), was adopted by Margaret I... Pommern redirects here. ... Eric of Pomerania A caricature of the king, the only contemporary likeness of him in existence Eric of Pomerania, Erik af Pommern, Erik VII (Danish title), Erik av Pommern (Eirik III) (Norwegian title) Erik av Pommern (Eric XIII) (Swedish title) or Eryk Pomorski (Polish title), was adopted by Margaret I... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... Christopher of Bavaria, known by his Danish and Norwegian title as Christoffer (III) af/av Bayern and by his Swedish title as Kristofer av Bayern (26 February 1418-6 January 1448) was union king of Denmark and Norway (1440-1448), and of Sweden (1441-1448). ... A palatinate is a territory administered by a count palatine, originally the direct representative of the sovereign, but later the hereditary ruler of the territory subject to the crowns overlordship. ... Christopher of Bavaria, known by his Danish and Norwegian title as Christoffer (III) af/av Bayern and by his Swedish title as Kristofer av Bayern (26 February 1418-6 January 1448) was union king of Denmark and Norway (1440-1448), and of Sweden (1441-1448). ... The title of King of the Wends denoted sovereignty or claims over Slavic lands of southern coasts of the Baltic Sea, those otherwise called Mecklenburg, Holstein and Pomerania, and was from 12th century used by Kings of Denmark and from 16th century by Kings of Sweden. ... A lindworm (called lindorm in Scandinavia and Lindwurm in Germany; the name consists of two Germanic roots meaning roughly ensnaring serpent) is a large serpent-like dragon from European mythology and folklore. ... Funen (Danish: Fyn) is the third largest island of Denmark, it has a population of 445,000 people. ... The Royal Danish Army is the army of Denmark. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Bornholm is a Danish island in the Baltic Sea. ... The title of King of the Goths was for many centuries borne by both the Kings of Sweden and the Kings of Denmark, denoting sovereignty or claimed sovereignty over the antique people of the Goths, which is sort of poetic explanation. ... The winged lion of Mark the Evangelist for centuries has been the national emblem and landmark of Venice (detail from a painting by Vittore Carpaccio, 1516) The lion is a common charge in heraldry. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Lion (heraldry). ... This lists those feudal magnates (counts, dukes and other sort of princes) who have held Halland as fief, or its southern or northern part, titled as duke. ... is a historical province (landskap) on the western coast of Sweden. ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. ... Aft of the Soleil Royal, by Jean Bérain the Elder. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... The Jylland is the worlds last screw-propelled steam frigate. ... Jydske Dragonregiment (English: Jutland Dragoon Regiment) is the sole pure armoured regiment of the Royal Danish Army. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... “Nettles” redirects here. ... A chief enarched indented throughout in the arms of Sawbridgeworth A fess wavy in the arms of Welwyn Hatfield A chief embattled in the arms of Letchworth The lines used to divide and vary fields and charges in heraldry are by default straight, but may have many different shapes. ... In heraldry, a bordure is a border around a shield. ... Stormarn is a district in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... Delmenhorst is an urban district (Kreisfreie Stadt) in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Dithmarschen is a district in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... Stockfish is air-dried cod. ... Falcons eat humans. ...   is a county, province and municipality of Sweden and the second largest island in the Baltic Sea after Zealand. ... A lamb holding a Christian banner is a typical symbol for Agnus Dei. ... Map of the Estonian archipelago (Saaremaa and Hiiumaa) Landsat satellite photo of Saaremaa Saaremaa is the largest island (2,673 km²) belonging to Estonia. ... The Polish coat of arms has an eagle as the main subject. ... The first rule of heraldry is the rule of tincture: metal should not be put on metal, nor colour on colour (Humphrey Llwyd, 1568). ... For Pb as an abbreviation, see PB. General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series Post-transition metals or poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... Puttgarden ferry port Flügge lighthouse Fehmarn Sound Bridge from the sound Fehmarn (Danish, Femern) is an island and - since 2003 - a town on this island in the Baltic Sea, off the eastern coast of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, and ca. ... Bornholm is a Danish island in the Baltic Sea. ... The Coat of Arms of Lauenburg The Duchy of Lauenburg, also known as Saxe-Lauenburg was a medieval Duchy (Reichsfreiheit) that existed from 1296 in the extreme southeast region of Schleswig-Holstein with its territorial center in the modern district of Lauenburg. ...

Gallery

Related symbols

Coat of arms of Ribe
Coat of arms of Ribe

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Greater Coat of Arms The Lesser Coat of Arms Coat of Arms of Estonia. ... Greater coat of arms Coat of arms of Tallinn is the coat of arms of the Estonian capital Tallinn. ... The first known example of the insignia: the seal of Erik Abelsøn, Duke of Schleswig (d. ... The region of Schleswig (former English name: Sleswick, Danish: Sønderjylland or Slesvig, Low German: Sleswig, North Frisian: Slaswik or Sleesweg) covers the area about 60 km north and 70 km south of the border between Germany and Denmark. ... The first known example of the insignia: the seal of Erik Abelsøn, Duke of Schleswig (d. ... Sønderjyllands Amt (English: South Jutland County) is a county (Danish, amt) on the Jutland peninsula in southern Denmark. ... Ribe (German: Ripen) is the name of the oldest town of Denmark. ... Varde is a municipality in south-west Denmark, in the county of Ribe on the peninsula of Jutland. ... Lüneburg is a district in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Lüneburg is a district in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... The first known example of the insignia: the seal of Erik Abelsøn, Duke of Schleswig (d. ... Schleswig-Holstein is the northernmost of the 16 Bundesländer in Germany. ... Dannenberg is a town and a municipality in the district Lüchow-Dannenberg, in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... “Prince Philip” redirects here. ... Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (in Danish: Slesvig-Holsten-Sønderborg-Lyksborg (or Glücksborg), from Glücksburg in northernmost Germany, is a line of the House of Oldenburg that is descended from King King Christian III of Denmark, to which the royal houses of Denmark, Norway, and the exiled... The House of Oldenburg is a North German noble family and one of Europes most influential Royal Houses. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Danish National Archives. Valdemarernes våben (Danish). Retrieved on 23 July 2007.
  2. ^ Henry Petersen (1882): Et dansk Flag fra Unionstiden i Maria-Kirken i Lübeck, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel, p. 26 (Danish)
  3. ^ Official website of Tallinn. Tallinna täisvapp (Estonian). Retrieved on 24 July 2007.
  4. ^ a b Official website of the Danish monarchy. The Royal Coat of Arms (English). Retrieved on 23 July 2007.
  5. ^ Svane, Erling (1994). Det danske rigsvåben og kongevåben. Odense University Press, 169-179.  (Danish)
  6. ^ Anders Thiset (1893). "Om danske By- og Herredsvaaben" (in Danish). Tidsskrift for Kunstindustri (10th year): page 18. 
  7. ^ Svane, Erling (1994). Det danske rigsvåben og kongevåben. Odense University Press, 177.  (Danish)

is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Coats of arms of Denmark

[[kdcvnvfjankgng__


  Results from FactBites:
 
Coat of arms - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (711 words)
A coat of arms or armorial bearings (often just arms for short) is, in European tradition, a colorful design belonging to a particular person or group of people and used by him or her in a wide variety of ways.
Coats of arms have their origins in the designs used by medieval knights to make their armor and shield stand out in battle or tournaments and enable quick recognition by allies or spectators.
At a national level "coats of arms" are generally retained by monarchist states, such as the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Sweden and Denmark, or by states which formerly were ruled by a crowned sovereign such as Croatia and Romania.
Coat of arms of Denmark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (105 words)
The National Coat of Arms of Denmark is three three blue lions on a golden shield.
It is almost identical to the Coat of Arms of Estonia which can be traced directly back to King Valdemar II and the Danish rule in Estonia 1219-1346.
The main difference is that in the Danish coat of arms, the lions are crowned.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m