FACTOID # 23: Wisconsin has more metal fabricators per capita than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Coalition of the willing
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with multinational force in Iraq. (Discuss)
Countries with forces in Iraq and those who have lent logistical support, in addition to those formally affiliated with the "Coalition".
Countries with forces in Iraq and those who have lent logistical support, in addition to those formally affiliated with the "Coalition".
Original 2003 March 21 list
Original 2003 March 21 list

"Coalition of the Willing" is a phrase which has been used since the 1980s to refer to groups of nations acting collectively and often militarily outside of the jurisdiction of the United Nations mandates and administration. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that Coalition of the Willing be merged into this article or section. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 48 KB) Summary Countries with Military Forces in Iraq (also known as the Coalition of the Willing by the Bush Government)as of September 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 48 KB) Summary Countries with Military Forces in Iraq (also known as the Coalition of the Willing by the Bush Government)as of September 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (840x1316, 93 KB) Summary http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (840x1316, 93 KB) Summary http://www. ... The 1980s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1980 and 1989. ... In law, jurisdiction refers to the aspect of a any unique legal authority as being localized within boundaries. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ...


Its most prominent (and recent) use was by the administration of US President George W. Bush to refer to the multinational force in Iraq - nations whose governments supported the United States position in the Iraq disarmament crisis and later the March 2003 invasion of Iraq (see Post-invasion Iraq, 2003–2005). The original list in March 2003 included 48 members as written here. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... It has been suggested that Coalition of the Willing be merged into this article or section. ... The issue of Iraqs disarmament reached a crisis in 2002-2003, when George W. Bush demanded a complete end to alleged Iraqi production and use of weapons of mass destruction and that Iraq comply with UN Resolutions requiring UN inspectors unfettered access to areas those inspectors thought might have... The 2003 Invasion of Iraq began on March 20 comprising United States and United Kingdom forces (98%), and several other nations. ... Occupation zones in Iraq as of September 2003 The post-invasion period in Iraq followed the 2003 invasion of Iraq by a multinational coalition led by the United States, which overthrew the Baath Party government of Saddam Hussein. ...

Contents


Origins of the Phrase

The precise origins of the phrase are unknown, but it has been used since at least the late 1980s to refer to groups of nations acting collectively without regard to United Nations opinion. Specific uses of the phrase in the context of disarming Iraq began appearing in mid 2001.


The first American President known to have publicly mentioned acting with a "Coalition of the Willing" in place of a UN Mandate was Bill Clinton. The phrase was later used by George W. Bush to refer both to actions in Afghanistan and Iraq, although usage primarily focused on the latter. The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe, III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ...


Criticism of and Humorous Comment on the Phrase

Critics of Media Propaganda, such as John Pilger have pointed out that 90% of the military is from the US and Britain and is therefore accurately described as a predominantly Anglo-American force rather than as a Coalition. North Korean propaganda showing a soldier destroying the United States Capitol building. ... John Pilger John Pilger (born October 9, 1939) is an Australian journalist and documentary filmmaker from Sydney. ...


2004 Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry questioned the size of the coalition in a 2004 presidential debate, saying that Bush portrayed the effort as a widespread international consensus when actually only two major allies of the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia, had comparatively substantial numbers of soldiers on the ground during the initial invasion. President Bush responded by saying "Well, actually, he forgot Poland", and the phrase You forgot Poland was coined as a criticism of the types of members in the coalition, generally smaller countries sending relatively few troops, despite the fact that Poland is a a medium-sized country that later, during the occupation contributed much. John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... (Redirected from 2004 Presidential Debates) The 2004 United States Presidential Election Debates were sponsored by the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) and concluded October 13, nearly three weeks before election scheduled for November 2, 2004. ... You forgot Poland is a political slogan based on a statement by United States President George W. Bush concerning Polands involvement in the Iraq War during the first presidential election debate on September 30, 2004. ...


The majority of the population in most countries involved did not support the endeavour or their nation's participation. (See this Gallup International poll.


Many of the nations in the coalition formed for the 2003 invasion of Iraq stand to receive substantial aid packages and trade benefits from the United States in return for their support. It is for this reason that some editorial cartoons and political commentators have mockingly referred to them as the "coalition of the billing." Another term, used by those who believe coalition nations lied about aspects of the war, is "coalition of the shilling." This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ...


Due to the high percentage of states that were small, impoverished nations in need of United States financial aid, a New York Times editorial referred to it as the "Coalition Of Welfare States." The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


U.S. Senator Robert Byrd, ranking Democrat on the Senate Appropriations Committee, has referred to the coalition formed for the 2003 invasion of Iraq by the acronym COW, expressing his concern that the United States was being "milked" as a "cash cow." Each state elects two senators to the United States Senate. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is a West Virginia Democrat serving in the United States Senate. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations formed from the initial letter or letters of words, such as NATO and XHTML, and are pronounced in a way that is distinct from the full pronunciation of what the letters stand for. ...


Canadian MP Carolyn Parrish has referred to the "Coalition of the Willing" as the "Coalition of the Idiots". She, however, was reprimanded for these comments, and was eventually removed from the Liberal Party caucus. Members of the House of Commons in the 38th Parliament of Canada, as of November 10, 2005. ... Mark Critch (left), Carolyn Parrish (right) and a Bush doll, in a skit that led to her dismissal from the Liberal caucus. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is a political party in Canada. ...


Irish comedian Sean Moncrieff pointed out that "Many of these countries have been previously been 'liberated' by the United States, repeatedly and with extreme prejustice. And if you've ever been liberated by the United States, you'll know thats an experience you'll never want to go through again!" Sean Moncrieff is an Irish writer, journalist and television presenter. ...


Economics of participating countries

Although the Coalition of the Willing contains only about a fifth (38 of 193 [1]) of the world's countries, it includes a disproportionately large fraction of the world's economically powerful countries.


For instance, the CoW has contained:

  • 15 of the 30 OECD nations;
  • 15 of the 27 EU nations (Including the two acceding nations);
  • 5 of the top 10 nations by GDP;
  • 4 of the G8 nations;
  • Nations with 61% of the global GDP.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organisation of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ...

Coalition members

In order of number of troops (Estimated) committed to Iraq as of March 2005:


Members with current military involvement

  1. USA 150,000 troops.
  2. United Kingdom 8,500 -- had 45000 troops in and around Iraq at the time of invasion, expected to withdraw 3,000 more troops -- source
  3. South Korea 3,250 --Only reconstruction - announced plans to withdraw 1/3 of its troop in 2006 -- source
  4. Italy 3,030 -- Began phased withdrawal of troops in March 2005--source
  5. Poland 1,500 -- announced to keep about 900 troops until end of 2006 -- source
  6. Georgia 889
  7. Romania 860
  8. Australia 850 -- Had 2000 troops in and around Iraq at the time of invasion --source
  9. Japan 550 -- Only reconstruction
  10. Denmark 540
  11. Bulgaria 400 -- Will be reduced to 120 troops to guard the Ashraf refugee camp in 2006 -- source
  12. El Salvador 380
  13. Mongolia 180
  14. Azerbaijan 151
  15. Latvia 136
  16. Lithuania 118
  17. Slovakia 105
  18. Czech Republic 80
  19. Albania 70
  20. Ukraine 50 -- withdrew 900 troops in from October-December 2005
  21. Bosnia and Herzegovina 36
  22. Estonia 35
  23. Macedonia 33
  24. Kazakhstan 27
  25. Norway 10 -- Sent about 150 troops to Iraq, and later withdrew all but ten officers. The new Red/Red-Green Coalition-Government promises that it will withdraw the remaining ten officers soon.

Members with no military involvement

Several countries chose not to, or could not, sustain a military involvement with regards to personnel, but nonetheless pledged their solidarity with the Coalition. Additionally, some of these countries allowed coalition forces to use their territory as launching points for offensives.

  1. Angola 0
  2. Colombia 0
  3. Eritrea 0
  4. Ethiopia 0
  5. Kuwait 0
  6. Micronesia 0
  7. Rwanda 0
  8. Solomon Islands 0
  9. Uganda 0
  10. Uzbekistan 0

Members which have withdrawn

  1. Iceland 0 -- Mainly specialists and such.
  2. Nicaragua 0 -- Withdrew 115 troops in February 2004
  3. Dominican Republic 0 -- Withdrew 302 troops in May 2004
  4. Honduras 0 -- Withdrew 370 troops in June 2004
  5. Spain 0 -- Withdrew 1400 troops in June 2004
  6. Philippines 0 -- Withdrew 51 troops in July 2004
  7. Thailand 0 -- Withdrew 443 troops in August 2004
  8. Hungary 0 -- Withdrew 300-troop NATO training force in December 2004
  9. Tonga 0 -- Withdrew 40 troops in December 2004, citing completion
  10. Moldova 0 -- Withdrew 12 troops in February 2005
  11. Portugal 0 -- Withdrew 128 policemen in February 2005
  12. Netherlands 4 -- Withdrew 1350 troops in March 2005, later reduced troop level by nearly 800
  13. Singapore 0 -- Withdrew its single Amphibious transport dock deployed in the Persian Gulf in March 2005.

Canada does not support the Invasion of Iraq and is not a Coalition member but has 31 troops in the theatre as part of an exchange program with the United States military. Similarly, New Zealand did not support the invasion and is not considered part of the Coalition of the Willing, but sent army engineers to Iraq in 2004 after the establishment of the new sovereign Iraqi government. The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN, Malay: Angkatan Laut Republik Singapura, Simplified Chinese: 新加坡海军部队) is the navy of the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF). ...


Sources: Operation Iraqi Freedom - Coalition Forces, PWHCE, Global Security.


See also

The Iraq war or war in Iraq, is both an informal and formal term for military conflicts in Iraq that began with the invasion of 2003 by the multinational coalition of American, British, and other forces. ... The 2003 Invasion of Iraq began on March 20 comprising United States and United Kingdom forces (98%), and several other nations. ... Occupation zones in Iraq as of September 2003 The post-invasion period in Iraq followed the 2003 invasion of Iraq by a multinational coalition led by the United States, which overthrew the Baath Party government of Saddam Hussein. ... This article describes the positions of world governments prior to the actual initiation of the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and not their current positions as they may have changed since then. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Downing Street memo The Downing Street memo (occasionally DSM), sometimes described by critics of the Iraq War as the smoking gun memo, contains an overview of a secret 23 July 2002 meeting among United Kingdom Labour government, defence and intelligence figures, discussing... (Redirected from 2001 invasion of Afghanistan) The United States, with support from the United Kingdom, Australia and the Northern Alliance, Afghanistan in October 2001 as part of its War on Terrorism campaign. ...

External links and references


  Results from FactBites:
 
Coalition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (262 words)
A coalition government, in a parliamentary system, is a government composed of a coalition of parties.
In Australia, the Coalition is also used to refer to an alliance of three parties (the Liberals, Nationals and Country Liberals) existing in federal politics since 1922.
The phrase "Coalition of the Willing" was employed during the 2003 war in Iraq lead by the United States and its allies [1].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m