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Encyclopedia > Clyde Coombs

Clyde Hamilton Coombs (July 22, 1912 - February 4, 1988) was an American psychologist specialized in the field of mathematical psychology. He devised a voting system, that was hence named Coombs' method.




  Results from FactBites:
 
Nat' Academies Press, Biographical Memoirs V.61 (1992) (4229 words)
Coombs realized, as did other psychometricians, that the measurement of psychological attributes cannot be carried out using the standard logic of physical measurement that is based, in one form or another, on the concatenation of objects and is carried out by the counting of units.
Coombs' contribution to the analysis of preference, however, is not limited to the investigation of its formal structure and its psychological underpinnings.
Coombs applied these notions to a wide array of psychological problems, ranging from judgments of the severity of crimes to the pattern of citation in psychological journals, and from preferences concerning family composition to the problems of risk perception and risk preferences, to which he devoted much of his research.
Coombs' method - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (409 words)
The Coombs' method, created by Clyde Coombs, is a voting system used for single-winner elections in which each voter rank-orders the candidates.
Note that although Coomb's method chose the Condorcet winner here, this is not necessarily the case.
The Coombs' method is vulnerable to three strategies: compromising, push-over and teaming.
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