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Encyclopedia > Clinton health care plan

The Clinton health care plan was a 1993 healthcare reform package proposed by the administration of Bill Clinton, then sitting President of the United States. Healthcare reform is a general rubric used for discussing major policy changes--for the most part, governmental policy changes--to any existing healthcare system in a given place. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ...

Contents

Background

Clinton made health care reform one of the highest priorities of his administration. He asked the First Lady to chair the Task Force on National Health Care Reform.
Clinton made health care reform one of the highest priorities of his administration. He asked the First Lady to chair the Task Force on National Health Care Reform.

Clinton had campaigned heavily on health care in the 1992 election, and he quickly set up the Task Force on National Health Care Reform, headed by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, to come up with a comprehensive plan to provide universal health care for all Americans, which was to be a cornerstone of the administration's first-term agenda. A major health care speech was delivered by Clinton to a joint session of Congress on September 22, 1993, with an overwhelmingly positive response.[1][2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the Biggest loser/retard these united states have seen from New York. ... Universal health care is a state in which all residents of a geographic or political entity have access to health care by means of provision of health insurance or direct provision of health care. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives United States Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican... September 22 is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...


Debate

Former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop with former First Lady Hillary Clinton in the fall of 1993 promoting President Clinton's Health Security Act.
Former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop with former First Lady Hillary Clinton in the fall of 1993 promoting President Clinton's Health Security Act.

Starting on September 28, 1993, Hillary Clinton appeared for several days of testimony before five congressional committees on health care.[1] She showed a strong command of the issues, and her appearance was widely regarded as a triumphant success.[1] However, that very success was a wakeup call for opponents of the bill, who were able to become organized by the time the bill was finally presented to the Democratic-controlled Congress on November 20, 1993.[1] It was a complex proposal running more than 1,000 pages, the core element of which was an enforced mandate for employers to provide health insurance coverage to all of their employees through competitive but closely-regulated health maintenance organizations (HMOs). It confirmed the Republicans worst fears that the bill represented government-run health care, derisively called "HillaryCare" by critics. Conservatives, libertarians, and the insurance industry staged a campaign against the "Health Security" plan and criticized it as being overly bureaucratic and restrictive of patient choice. The effort included extensive advertising criticizing the plan, including the famous Harry and Louise ad paid for by the Health Insurance Association of America, which depicted a middle-class couple despairing over the plan's supposed complex, bureaucratic nature.[2][3] Time, CBS News, CNN, the Wall Street Journal and the Christian Science Monitor ran stories questioning whether there really was a health-care crisis.[4] Op-eds were written against it, including one in The Washington Post by University of Virginia Professor Martha Derthick that said, "In many years of studying American social policy, I have never read an official document that seemed so suffused with coercion and political naivete ... with its drastic prescriptions for controlling the conduct of state governments, employers, drug manufacturers, doctors, hospitals and you and me."[5] Daniel Patrick Moynihan qualified his agreement that "there is no health care crisis" by stating "there is an insurance crisis" but also indicated "anyone who thinks [the Clinton health care plan] can work in the real world as presently written isn't living in it."[6] Meanwhile, Democrats, instead of uniting behind the President's original proposal, offered a number of competing plans of their own. Some criticized the plan from the left, preferring a Canadian-style single payer system. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (483 × 724 pixel, file size: 171 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (483 × 724 pixel, file size: 171 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... C. Everett Koop Charles Everett Koop, M.D. (born October 14, 1916 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American physician. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Health insurance is a type of insurance whereby the insurer pays the medical costs of the insured if the insured becomes sick due to covered causes, or due to accidents. ... A Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) is a type of Managed Care Organization (MCO) that provides a form of health insurance coverage in the United States that is fulfilled through hospitals, doctors, and other providers with which the HMO has a contract. ... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... Harry and Louise was a television commercial aired by the health insurance industry in opposition to President Bill Clintons proposed health care plan in 1993. ... Time, (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. Its current president is Sean McManus who is also head of CBS Sports. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is an international newspaper published daily, Monday through Friday. ... An Op-Ed is a piece of writing expressing an opinion. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Daniel Patrick Pat Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a United States Senator, Ambassador, and eminent sociologist. ... Single-payer health care is a system of paying for health care, in which a single government entity pays for all health care costs, usually from taxes. ...


Defeat

On September 26, 1994, George J. Mitchell, the Senate Majority Leader, announced that the plan was dead, at least for that session of Congress. The defeat weakened Clinton politically, emboldened Republicans, and contributed to the notion that Hillary Clinton was a big-government liberal.[7] In the 1994 election, the Republican revolution gave the GOP control of both houses of Congress, ending prospects for a Clinton-sponsored health care overhaul. Comprehensive reform aimed at creating universal health care in the United States has not been seriously considered by Congress since. September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933 in Waterville, Maine) is Chairman of the Walt Disney Company. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... The Republican Revolution refers to the success of Republican Party in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate. ...


Implications for the 2008 Presidential Election

In 2004, as a Senator for the State of New York, Hillary Clinton argued in the The New York Times that the current health care system is unsustainable, and offered several solutions.[8] The article conveyed a more moderate tone, including areas of agreement with one-time rival Newt Gingrich. In 2005, referring to her previous efforts at health care reform, Hillary Clinton said "I learned some valuable lessons about the legislative process, the importance of bipartisan cooperation and the wisdom of taking small steps to get a big job done."[7] By this time, Clinton had forged a relatively close relationship with Newt Gingrich working together on a military readiness panel for the Pentagon.[9] The relationship crossed over to health care, and Hillary and Newt became unlikely partners. Gingrich was quick to point out that "any Republican who thinks she's going to be easy to beat has a total amnesia about the history of the Clintons."[9] In a series of public appearances, Gingrich expressed an amazing amount of agreement with Senator Clinton, including a collaboration for a health care bill to modernize medical record keeping.[10][11] Democratic strategist Hank Sheinkopf called the relationship "mutually beneficial," suggesting that the partnership helped each appeal to voters in the center.[9] Again in 2007, she said, "I think that both the process and the plan were flawed. We were trying to do something that was very hard to do, and we made a lot of mistakes."[12] However, others have noted similarities between the Clinton Health Plan and Republican Mitt Romney's health care plan,[2][13] Ironically, Hillary received hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from doctors, hospitals, drug companies, and insurance companies for her 2006 re-election in the Senate, including several insurance companies were members of the Health Insurance Association of America that helped defeat the Clinton Health Plain in 1994.[3] Charles N. Kahn III, a Republican who was executive vice president of the Health Insurance Association in 1993 and 1994, now works with Hillary in his capacity as president of the Federation of American Hospitals. He refers to his previous battles with Hillary as "ancient history," and says that health care executives are contributing to her now because "she is extremely knowledgeable about health care and has become a Congressional leader on the issue."[3] Tracey Schmitt, spokesperson for the Republican National Committee, showed skepticism of Hillary's more moderate approach, saying "This reveals that Hillary Clinton is a politician more concerned with campaign contributions than policies she claims to support."[3] The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Newton Leroy Gingrich (born June 17, 1943), Ph. ... Newton Leroy Gingrich (born June 17, 1943), Ph. ... Charles N. Kahn III (Chip) is President of the Federation of American Hospitals, the national advocacy organization for investor-owned hospitals and health systems. ... Bush/Cheney, 2004 campaign manager Ken Mehlman is the current chairman of the RNC. The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d "Events leading up to Clinton's Healthcare Address to Congress," Timeline from PBS's The System. Accessed June 10, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c Jonathan Cohn, "Hillary was Right - The health care plan that dares not speak its name," The New Republic, June 5, 2007. Accessed June 8, 2007.
  3. ^ a b c d Raymond Hernandez and Robert Pear, "Once an Enemy, Health Industry Warms to Clinton," The New York Times, July 12, 2006. Accessed June 9, 2007.
  4. ^ "The Rise and Fall of the Political Catchphrase," Time, February 14, 1994. Traces the origins of the Republican counter-argument "there is no health care crisis." Accessed June 8, 2007.
  5. ^ As quoted by George Will in "Inoculated for Exuberance?" The Washington Post, November 10, 2006. Accessed June 9, 2006.
  6. ^ Michael Kramer, "The Political Interest," Time, January 31, 1994. "Slowly but surely, Bill Clinton's health-care plan is headed for the triage unit." Accessed June 8, 2007.
  7. ^ a b "The Evolution of Hillary Clinton," New York Times, July 13, 2005. Accessed June 8, 2007.
  8. ^ Hillary Clinton, "Now Can We Talk About Health Care?" The New York Times, April 18, 2004. Accessed June 8, 2007.
  9. ^ a b c Raymond Hernandez, "Oddly, Hillary and, Yes, Newt Agree to Agree, The New York Times, May 13, 2005. Accessed June 9, 2007.
  10. ^ "Gingrich, Clinton Collaborate on Health Care Bill," Associated Press in the Washington Post, May 12, 2005. Accessed June 10, 2007.
  11. ^ Dana Milbank, "The Reformer and the Gadfly Agree on Health Care," [[Washington Post], July 22, 2005. Accessed June 10, 2007.
  12. ^ Robin Toner and Anne Kornblut, "Wounds Salved, Clinton Returns to Health Care," The New York Times, June 10, 2006. Accessed June 8, 2007.
  13. ^ Michael F. Cannon, "What Mitt and Hillary Have in Common," The National Review Online, June 5, 2007. Accessed June 8, 2007.

    If I were advising Sen. Clinton, I would be urging her to boast that her approach to health-care reform enjoys support from conservatives like the Heritage Foundation and Gov. Romney. If I were advising Gov. Romney, I would prescribe a severe case of amnesia and a health-care agenda that actually reduces the role of government. Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Jonathan Cohn is a senior editor at The New Republic magazine and a media fellow at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. ... For other uses, see the New Republic disambiguation page. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Time, (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning, conservative American newspaper columnist, journalist, and author. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... Time, (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... ... Dana T. Milbank (born 27 April 1968) is an American political reporter for the Washington Post. ... Anne Kornblut during a television appearance on PBS Anne Elise Kornblut (born February 25, 1973), an American journalist. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Clinton health care plan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (425 words)
The result, announced by President Clinton in an address to Congress on September 22, 1993, was a complex and complicated proposal running more than 1,000 pages, the core element of which was an enforced mandate for employers to provide health insurance coverage to all of their employees through competitive but closely-regulated health maintenance organizations (HMOs).
The plan, referred to derisively as "Hillary Care" by some, was initially well-received by liberal political leaders and most Americans who said health care was the most important issue facing the country.
On September 26, 1994, Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell announced that the plan was dead, at least for that session of Congress.
2000_10 | How We Got It Anyway: The Clinton Health Plan Never Died (2986 words)
Health care alliances and employer mandates failed to materialize, but Congress is looking at tax incentives to encourage more employers to provide coverage for workers.
The bottom line: Clinton's reform proposals established the baseline for congressional consideration of health care issues — and led to the adoption (or perhaps eventual adoption) of important pieces of legislation affecting managed care organizations.
Joe Karpinski, a Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee staff member, says that the Clinton proposal failed because it was seen as "pretty much a government takeover of the health care system." One of the big concerns, Karpinski says, was that the proposal would result in a loss of choice of doctor by patients.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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