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Encyclopedia > Climax (narrative)

The climax (or "turning point") of a narrative work is its point of highest tension or drama in which the solution is given. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In classical culture, perhaps reflecting in part low literacy levels, analysis of fictional narratives focused on drama, and identified patterns for comedy (in the sense of drama with a "happy ending") and tragedy (in the sense of drama with an "unhappy ending"). The principles involved generally remain important in modern narrative literature, and include identification of the climax. Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The word comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humor with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... For other uses, see Tragedy (disambiguation). ...


In a prose work of fiction, the climax often resembles that of the classical comedy, occurring approximately two-thirds of the way through the text or performance, after the rising action and before the falling action. It is the moment of greatest danger for the hero(s) and usually consists of a seemingly inevitable prospect of failure, followed by a hard-to-anticipate recovery. In the plot analysis of a typical play, book or film, rising action refers to the dynamic period after the exposition, when conflict has been introduced. ... Denouement, in literature, is the end part of a story after the climax. ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ...


While the novel, short story, poetry and drama are the focus of much literary analysis, late 20th century literary criticism also recognizes the important similarities, including the climax, of new genres like the feature film. This article is about the literary concept. ... This article is in need of attention. ... This article is about the art form. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ...


Arguably, the punch line of a joke is a good analogue of the climax of other forms of fictional narrative, though the absence of any falling action is an essential variation probably reflecting the nature of humor. A punch line is the final part of a joke, usually the word, sentence or exchange of sentences which is intended to be funny and to provoke laughter from listeners. ... A joke is a short story or ironic depiction of a situation communicated with the intent of being humorous. ... Look up Humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In many non-fictional narrative genres, even though the author lacks the same freedom to control the action and "plot", selection of subject matter, degree of detail, and emphasis permit an author to create similar structures. This can sometimes be recognizable even in some highly constrained genres, such as patient records and peer-reviewed scholarly writings, and need not amount to a breach of professional standards. A genre [], (French: kind or sort from Greek: γένος (genos)) is a loose set of criteria for a category of literary composition; the term is also used for any other form of art or utterance. ...



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Anti-Climax

An anti-climax is where something which would appear to be difficult to solve in a plot is solved through something trivial. For example, destroying a heavily guarded facility would require advanced technology, teamwork and weaponry for a climax, but in an anti-climax it may just consist of pushing a red button which says "Emergency Self-Destruct".


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Essay Info :: Narrative essay writing (591 words)
Narrative essays are told from a defined point of view, often the author's, so there is feeling as well as specific and often sensory details provided to get the reader involved in the elements and sequence of the story.
A basic example of a narrative report is a "book report" that outlines a book; it includes the characters, their actions, possibly the plot, and, perhaps, some scenes.
Narratives are generally written in the first person, that is, using I. However, third person (he, she, or it) can also be used.
Climax (narrative) (280 words)
In classical culture, perhaps reflecting in part low literacy levels, analysis of fictional narratives focused on drama, and identified patterns for comedy (in the sense of drama with a "happy ending") and tragedy (in the sense of drama with an "unhappy ending").
In a prose work of fiction, the climax often resembles that of the classical comedy, occurring approximately two-thirds to three-quarters of the way through the text or performance, after the rising action and before the falling action.
Arguably, the punch line of a joke is a good analogue of the climax of other forms of fictional narrative, though the absence of any falling action is an essential variation probably reflecting the nature of humor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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