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Encyclopedia > Clerk

Clerk, the vocational title, commonly refers to a white collar office worker who conducts general office or (in some instances) sales tasks. The responsibilities of clerical workers commonly include record keeping, filing, staffing service counters and other administrative tasks.[1] In American English, this includes shop staff, but in British English, such people are known as shop assistants and are not considered to be clerks. Also, the pronunciation is different: /klɑː(ɹ)k/ ('clark'/'clahk') in most British English dialects, but /klɝk/ ('clurk') in American English. Clerk or clerks may refer to one of the following. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... British English (BrE, BE, en-GB) is the broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere in the Anglophone world. ...

Contents

History

The word clerk, derived from the Latin clericus meaning 'cleric', i.e. clergyman (Latin was the foremost language used at most early medieval courts, writing mainly entrusted to clergy as most laymen couldn't even read), can denote someone who works in an office and whose duties include record-keeping or correspondence. The word entered English from Scots Gaelic clèireach also derived from Latin clericus, which in turn derived from Greek κληρικός (klerikos) "of the clergy"[2][3]. A cleric is a member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals. ... see also Holy Orders The following terms have traditional meanings for the Anglican Church, and possibly beyond: A churchman is in principle a member of a church congregation, in practice someone in holy orders. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


In a medieval context, the word meant "Scholar" and still related to the word "cleric". Even today, the term Clerk regular designates a type of regular clerics. The cognate terms in some languages, e.g. Klerk in Dutch, became restricted to a specific, fairly low rank in the administrative hierarchy. A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline, perhaps receiving financial support through a scholarship. ... A cleric is a member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals. ... The term Clerks Regular (singular Clerk Regular) designates a number of Catholic clerics who are regular, but inthe strictest sense of the word are not Canons Regular. ... Public Administration can be broadly described as the development, implementation and study of government policy. ...


United States

Clerical workers are perhaps the largest occupational group in the United States. In 2004 there were 3.1 million general office clerks,[4] 1.5 million office administrative supervisors and 4.1 million secretaries.[5] Clerical occupations often do not require a college degree, though some college education or 1 to 2 years in vocational programs are common qualifications. Familiarity with office equipment and certain software programs is also often required. Employers may provide clerical training.[6] The median salary for clerks is $23,000, while the national median income for workers age 25 or older is $33,000.[7] Median salaries ranged from $22,770 for general office clerks to $34,970 for secretaries and $41,030 for administrative supervisors. Clerical workers are considered working class by American sociologists such as William Thompson, Joseph Hickey or James Henslin as they preform highly routinized tasks with relatively little autonomy.[8] Sociologist Dennis Gilbert, argues that the white and blue collar divide has shifted to a divide between professionals, including some semi-professionals, and routinized white collar workers.[9] White collar office supervisors may be considered lower middle class with some secretaries being located in that part of the socio-economic strata where the working and middle classes overlap. A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... Dennis Gilbert is professor and chair of sociology at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. ...


Traditionally clerical positions have been held almost exclusively by women. Even today, the vast majority of clerical workers in the US continue to be female. As with other pre-dominantly female positions, clerical occupations were and, to some extent, continue to be assigned relatively low prestige on a sexist basis.[10] The term pink collar worker is often used to describe predominantly female white collar positions. A pink-collar worker does work that is traditionally or most likely done by women, especially a male pink-collar worker, or work that is performed in an office-environment but does not require the professional training of white-collar work. ...


Functions and titles

Various functions or offices, generally of such 'clerical' nature, include the word and an indication of the task and/or employer, that is lower in position. For example:

However in large offices and organizations which require an administrative hierarchy, some titles simply indicate the relative rank of certain clerical positions, e.g. Head Clerk, Junior Clerk, Clerk, Senior Clerk, Principal Clerk, Senior Principal Clerk, Chief Clerk, Senior Chief Clerk, Executive Clerk, Senior Executive Clerk, Principal Executive Clerk. In the United States, a city clerk as an elected or appointed official who is charged with the responsibility of being the official keeper of the municipal records. ... A Clerk of the Peace is a person whose function was to keep the records of the Quarter Sessions and to frame presentments and indictments. ... The College of Chaplains of the Ecclesiastical Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom is under the Clerk of the Closet, an office dating from 1437. ... The College of Chaplains of the Ecclesiastical Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom is under the Clerk of the Closet, an office dating from 1437. ... The Clerk of the Green Cloth was a position in the British Royal Household. ... The term county clerk has been commonly applied, in several English-speaking countries, to an influential employee of a county administration. ... A court clerk or clerk of the court is an occupation whose responsibilities include maintaining the records of a court. ... The Clerk of the Supreme Court of the United States is the officer of the Supreme Court of the United States responsible for overseeing filings with the Court and maintaining its records. ... A data entry clerk is a member of staff who reads hand-written or printed records and types them into a computer. ... In the United States, Canada and Brazil, a law clerk is a person who provides assistance to a judge in researching issues before the court and in writing opinions. ... The adult voices of College Choirs at Oxford and Cambridge University are often provided by the clerks. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A college (Latin collegium) can be the name of any group of colleagues; originally it meant a group of people living together under a common set of rules (con-, together + leg-, law). As a consequence members of colleges were originally styled fellow and still are in some places. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... A patent clerk or patent examiner is an employee, usually a civil servant, working within a patent office. ... Clerks of Works are the most highly qualified non_commissioned tradesmen in the Royal Engineers. ... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or Noncom, is an enlisted member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... The Clerk of the Works or Clerk of Works (often abbreviated CoW) is a person employed by the client on the site of a building construction project to represent his interests and verify that the design brief and quality standards are complied with. ... Construction on the North Bytown Bridge in Ottawa, Canada. ... The Clerk of the Privy Council (French: Greffier du Conseil privé) is the senior civil servant in the government and the Secretary to the Canadian Cabinet. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Cabinet of Canada plays an important role in the Canadian government in accordance with the Westminster System. ...


Alternatively (in American English) a clerk is a person who sells items in a store or performs services at a desk, e.g.

  • sales clerk (as in grocery sales)
  • deli clerk
  • hotel front desk clerk
  • service desk clerk
  • cash register clerk

The surnames Clark, Clarke, Clerk, Clerke are derived from this occupation. A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... // Clark was the original English spelling version of Scottish Gaelic Clèireach, which was in turn derived from Latin clericus meaning cleric/clergyman. Clark was originally spelled Clerk when it first entered English from Scottish Gaelic. ... People whose surname is Clarke include (see also Clark): Alexander R. Clarke, British geodesist, whose 1866 spheroid was the standard Earth spheroid for a very long time Sir Arthur C. Clarke (born 1917) is an author and inventor, probably most famous for his science fiction novel 2001: A Space Odyssey... Clerke may refer to: Charles Clerke (1741–1779), British naval officer and explorer. ...


See also

White-collar workers perform tasks which are less laborious yet often more highly paid than blue-collar workers, who do manual work. ... A pink-collar worker does work that is traditionally or most likely done by women, especially a male pink-collar worker, or work that is performed in an office-environment but does not require the professional training of white-collar work. ... For other uses, see Secretary (disambiguation). ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens of thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... The clerk of a Quaker meeting is a critical role for the conduct of Quaker affairs. ...

References

  1. ^ Meriam Webster, definition of clerical worker. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  2. ^ Clerk, Online Etymology Dictionary
  3. ^ Klerikos, Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, "A Greek-English Lexicon", at Perseus
  4. ^ US Department of Labor, General office clerks. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  5. ^ US Department of Labor, Secretaries and administrative assistants. Retrieved on 2006-06-07.
  6. ^ US Department of Labor, training of secretaries. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  7. ^ U.S. Census Bureau, personal income distribution, age 25+, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  8. ^ Thompson, William; Joseph Hickey (2005). Society in Focus. Boston, MA: Pearson. 0-205-41365-X. 
  9. ^ Gilbert, Dennis (1998). The American Class Structure. New York: Wadsworth Publishing. 0-534-50520-1. 
  10. ^ Williams, Brian; Stacey C. Sawyer, Carl M. Wahlstrom (2005). Marriages, Families & Intimate Relationships. Boston, MA: Pearson. 0-205-36674-0. 
Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

 
 

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