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Encyclopedia > Cleopatra VII
Cleopatra Selene Philopator
Queen of Egypt
Coin of Cleopatra VII, with her effigy.
Coin of Cleopatra VII, depicting Cleopatra in profile.
Reign 51 BC–12 August 30 BC
Ptolemy XIII (51 BC–47 BC)
Ptolemy XIV (47 BC–44 BC)
Caesarion (44 BC–30 BC)
Born January 69 BC
Alexandria
Died 12 August[citation needed] 30 BC
Alexandria
Predecessor Ptolemy XII
Successor None (Roman province)
Consort Ptolemy XIII
Julius Caesar
Mark Antony
Issue Caesarion, Alexander Helios, Cleopatra Selene II, Ptolemy Philadelphus
Dynasty Ptolemaic
Father Ptolemy XII
Mother Cleopatra V of Egypt

Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator (in Greek, Κλεοπάτρα Φιλοπάτωρ; January 69 BC12 August[citation needed] 30 BC) was a Hellenistic co-ruler of Egypt with her father (Ptolemy XII Auletes) and later with her brothers/husbands Ptolemy XIII and Ptolemy XIV. She later became the supreme ruler of Egypt, as pharaoh, consummated a liaison with Gaius Julius Caesar that solidified her grip on the throne, and, after Caesar's assassination, aligned with Mark Antony, with whom she produced twins. In all, Cleopatra had four children, one by Caesar (Caesarion) and three by Antony (Cleopatra Selene II, Alexander Helios, and Ptolemy Philadelphus). Her unions with her brothers produced no children. It is possible that they were never consummated; in any case, they were not close. Her reign marks the end of the Hellenistic Era and the beginning of the Roman Era in the eastern Mediterranean. She was the last Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt (her son by Julius Caesar, Caesarion, ruled in name only before Augustus had him executed). Even though she still bore the ancient Egyptian title Pharaoh, her society's language was Greek and its culture was Hellenistic. When Cleopatra was born, the Great Pyramid was already at least 2,500 years old. Her society's understanding of the Ancient hieroglyphic language and culture of Egypt already was spotty. It was at best a reconstruction, not first-hand knowledge[citation needed]. Cleopatra followed the Egyptian belief system in the land's many gods and goddesses. Her patron goddess was Isis, and thus during her reign, it was believed that she was the re-incarnation and embodiment of the goddess of wisdom. Look up Cleopatra in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... cleopatra ruled seneca for 10 years before she ruled Egypt. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 605 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1164 × 1153 pixel, file size: 385 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Octavian becomes Roman Consul for the fourth time. ... Ptolemy XIII Theos Philopator (lived 62 BCE/61 BCE–January 13, 47 BCE?, reigned from 51 BCE) was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ... Ptolemy XIV (lived 60 BC/59 BC - 44 BC, reigned 47 BC - 44 BC), a son of Ptolemy XII of Egypt was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ... A relief of Cleopatra and Caesarion at the temple of Dendera, Egypt Ptolemy XV[1] Philopator Philometor Caesar, nicknamed Caesarion (little Caesar) Greek: Πτολεμαίος ΙΕ Φιλοπάτωρ Φιλομήτωρ Καίσαρ, Καισαρίων (June 23, 47 BC – August, 30 BC) was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned, as a child, jointly with his mother, Cleopatra... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 74 BC 73 BC 72 BC 71 BC 70 BC 69 BC 68 BC 67 BC 66... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Octavian becomes Roman Consul for the fourth time. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... Bust of Ptolemy XII Auletes, Louvre Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos Theos Philopator Theos Philadelphos (Greek:Πτολεμαίος Νέος Διόνυσος Θέος Φιλοπάτωρ Θεός Φιλάδελφος,New Dionysus, God Beloved of his Father, God Beloved of his Brother) (117 BC - 51 BC) was son of Ptolemy IX Soter II. His mother is unknown. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... Ptolemy XIII Theos Philopator (Greek: Πτολεμαίος Θεός Φιλοπάτωρ, lived 62 BC/61 BC – January 13, 47 BC?, reigned from 51 BC) was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty (305–30 BC) of Egypt. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Bust of Mark Antony Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) ( January 14 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. ... A relief of Cleopatra and Caesarion at the temple of Dendera, Egypt Ptolemy XV[1] Philopator Philometor Caesar, nicknamed Caesarion (little Caesar) Greek: Πτολεμαίος ΙΕ Φιλοπάτωρ Φιλομήτωρ Καίσαρ, Καισαρίων (June 23, 47 BC – August, 30 BC) was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned, as a child, jointly with his mother, Cleopatra... Alexander Helios (25 December 40 BC – ? ) was the son of Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Mark Antony, and the twin brother of Cleopatra Selene. ... Cleopatra Selene II (Greek:η Κλεοπάτρα Σελήνη, 25 December 40 BC-6), also known as Cleopatra VIII of Egypt was a Ptolemaic Princess and was the only daughter to Greek Ptolemaic Queen Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Roman Triumvir Mark Antony. ... Ptolemy Philadelphus (Greek: ο Πτολεμαίος Φιλάδελφος, August/September 36 BC - 29 BC) was a Ptolemaic Prince and was the youngest child of Greek Ptolemaic Queen Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Roman Triumvir Mark Antony. ... cleopatra ruled seneca for 10 years before she ruled Egypt. ... Bust of Ptolemy XII Auletes, Louvre Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos Theos Philopator Theos Philadelphos (Greek:Πτολεμαίος Νέος Διόνυσος Θέος Φιλοπάτωρ Θεός Φιλάδελφος,New Dionysus, God Beloved of his Father, God Beloved of his Brother) (117 BC - 51 BC) was son of Ptolemy IX Soter II. His mother is unknown. ... Cleopatra V of Egypt (Greek: Κλεοπάτρα) was the mother of Cleopatra VII, by her husband and brother Ptolemy XII of Egypt, and was possibly the mother of Cleopatra VI of Egypt and Berenice IV. She co-ruled Egypt with her daughter Berenice IV for a year before her death, then her... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 74 BC 73 BC 72 BC 71 BC 70 BC 69 BC 68 BC 67 BC 66... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Octavian becomes Roman Consul for the fourth time. ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos Theos Philopator Theos Philadelphos (New Dionysus, God Beloved of his Father, God Beloved of his Brother) (117 BCE - 51 BCE) was son of Ptolemy IX Soter II. His mother is unknown. ... Ptolemy XIII Theos Philopator (lived 62 BCE/61 BCE–January 13, 47 BCE?, reigned from 51 BCE) was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ... Ptolemy XIV (lived 60 BC/59 BC - 44 BC, reigned 47 BC - 44 BC), a son of Ptolemy XII of Egypt was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Bust of Mark Antony Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) ( January 14 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... A relief of Cleopatra and Caesarion at the temple of Dendera, Egypt Ptolemy XV[1] Philopator Philometor Caesar, nicknamed Caesarion (little Caesar) Greek: Πτολεμαίος ΙΕ Φιλοπάτωρ Φιλομήτωρ Καίσαρ, Καισαρίων (June 23, 47 BC – August, 30 BC) was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned, as a child, jointly with his mother, Cleopatra... Cleopatra Selene II (Greek:η Κλεοπάτρα Σελήνη, 25 December 40 BC-6), also known as Cleopatra VIII of Egypt was a Ptolemaic Princess and was the only daughter to Greek Ptolemaic Queen Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Roman Triumvir Mark Antony. ... Alexander Helios (25 December 40 BC – ? ) was the son of Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Mark Antony, and the twin brother of Cleopatra Selene. ... Ptolemy Philadelphus (Greek: ο Πτολεμαίος Φιλάδελφος, August/September 36 BC - 29 BC) was a Ptolemaic Prince and was the youngest child of Greek Ptolemaic Queen Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Roman Triumvir Mark Antony. ... The Hellenistic period (4th - 1st c. ... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... A relief of Cleopatra and Caesarion at the temple of Dendera, Egypt Ptolemy XV[1] Philopator Philometor Caesar, nicknamed Caesarion (little Caesar) Greek: Πτολεμαίος ΙΕ Φιλοπάτωρ Φιλομήτωρ Καίσαρ, Καισαρίων (June 23, 47 BC – August, 30 BC) was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned, as a child, jointly with his mother, Cleopatra... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... The Great Pyramid of Giza, (sometimes spelled Gizeh) is the oldest and last remaining of the Seven Wonders of the World and the most famous pyramid in the world. ...


After Antony's rival and Caesar's legal heir, Gaius Julius Caesar Octavian (who later became the first Roman Emperor, Augustus), brought the might of Rome against Egypt, it is said that Cleopatra took her own life on 12 August[citation needed] 30 BC, allegedly by means of an asp. Her legacy survives in the form of numerous dramatizations of her story, including William Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, Bernard Shaw's Caesar & Cleopatra, several films and the recent HBO/BBC series Rome. For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Octavian becomes Roman Consul for the fourth time. ... Vipera aspis Asp is the modern - supposedly chosen by W. Shakespeare - form of aspis. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Anthony and Cleopatra, by Lawrence Alma-Tadema. ... Multiple people share the name Bernard Shaw: George Bernard Shaw, the celebrated Irish playwright (1856 - 1950) Bernard Shaw, a journalist and longtime CNN anchorman (1940 - ) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Caesar and Cleopatra may refer to: Caesar and Cleopatra (play), a play by George Bernard Shaw Caesar and Cleopatra (1945 film), a film based on the play by George Bernard Shaw and produced by Gabriel Pascal. ... Left to right, the films from 1934, 1963 and 1999 Cleopatra is the name of several movies about Cleopatra VII of Egypt, the last Ancient Egyptian queen of the same name. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Rome is a multiple Emmy Award-winning historical drama, produced in Italy for television by the BBC (UK), HBO (USA), and RAI (Italy). ...


Her mother was Cleopatra V of Egypt—who co-ruled Egypt with another daughter, Berenice IV, for a year before her death—yet Cleopatra, borne of the union with Ptolemy XII Auletes, was a direct descendant of Alexander the Great's general, Ptolemy I Soter, son of Arsinoe and Lacus, both of Macedon. A Greek by language and culture, Cleopatra is reputed to have been the first member of her family in their 300-year reign in Egypt to have learned the Egyptian language. Cleopatra V of Egypt (Greek: Κλεοπάτρα) was the mother of Cleopatra VII, by her husband and brother Ptolemy XII of Egypt, and was possibly the mother of Cleopatra VI of Egypt and Berenice IV. She co-ruled Egypt with her daughter Berenice IV for a year before her death, then her... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Ptolemy I Soter (Greek: , Ptolemaios Soter, i. ... Ancient Macedons regions and towns Macedon or Macedonia (Greek ) was the name of an ancient kingdom in the northern-most part of ancient Greece, bordered by the kingdom of Epirus to the west and the region of Thrace to the east. ... Spoken in: Ancient Egypt Language extinction: evolved into Demotic by 600 BC, into Coptic by AD 200, and was extinct by the 17th century Language family: Afro-Asiatic  Egyptian  Writing system: hieroglyphs, cursive hieroglyphs, hieratic, and demotic (later, occasionally Arabic script in government translations) Language codes ISO 639-1: none...


Cleopatra is one of the few historical figures who remains, to this day, popular in modern culture. Tales of legendary beauty and an unrivaled strength of will have made her an idolized character of various forms of media. These claims are largely unsubstantiated, as the traditional concepts of beauty have been subject to reappraisals throughout the ages. It is reasonably certain, however, that Cleopatra possessed significant political influence.


Centralization of power and corruption led to uprising in and loss of Cyprus and of Cyrenaica, making Ptolemy's reign one of the most calamitous of the dynasty. When Ptolemy made a journey to Rome with Cleopatra, Tryphaena seized the Crown of Egypt. Shortly after arrangements for Roman assistance in Egypt, Ptolemy's followers assassinated Tryphaena and killed her guard. Berenice's guards in turn killed those followers. A government in which power is concentrated in a central authority to which local governments are subject. ... The Roman Empire ca. ...


In 58 BC Cleopatra's older sister, Berenice IV seized power from her father. With the assistance of the Roman governor of Syria, Aulus Gabinius, Ptolemy XII overturned his eldest daughter in 55 BC and had her executed. Cleopatra's other older sister Tryphaena took over shortly after that. She was killed as well, which left Cleopatra with her husband and younger brother, Ptolemy XIII, joint heirs to the throne. Berenice IV (Greek: Βερενίκη),born in Alexandria, Egypt in 77 b. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Aulus Gabinius, Roman statesman and general, and supporter of Pompey, was a prominent figure in the later days of the Roman Republic. ... Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos Theos Philopator Theos Philadelphos (117 BCE - 51 BCE) was son of Ptolemy IX Soter II. His mother is unknown. ... Cleopatra VI Tryphaena (Greek: Κλεοπάτρα Τρύφαινα) was the daughter of Ptolemy XII Auletes and (probably) Cleopatra V. She was born in early 140 or 141 BC and married Antiochus VIII Grypus, king of Syria, in 124 BC. Cleopatra Tryphaena bore Antiochus VIII Grypus four sons: Seleucus VI Epiphanes, Antiochus XI Epiphanes, Demetrius... Ptolemy XIII Theos Philopator (Greek: Πτολεμαίος Θεός Φιλοπάτωρ, lived 62 BC/61 BC – January 13, 47 BC?, reigned from 51 BC) was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty (305–30 BC) of Egypt. ...

Contents

Accession to the throne

Cleopatra VII.

Ptolemy XII died in March 51 BC, making the 17-year-old Cleopatra and her brother, the 12-year-old Ptolemy XIII joint monarchs. The first three years of their reign were difficult, due to economic difficulties, famine, deficient floods of the Nile, and political conflicts. Although Cleopatra was married to her young brother, she quickly showed indications that she had no intentions of sharing power with him. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 615 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (738 × 720 pixels, file size: 115 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 615 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (738 × 720 pixels, file size: 115 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos Theos Philopator Theos Philadelphos (117 BCE - 51 BCE) was son of Ptolemy IX Soter II. His mother is unknown. ... Ptolemy XIII (lived 62 BC/61 BC -January 13? 47 BC, reigned 51 BC - January 13?, 47 BC) was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ... The Nile (Arabic: , transliteration: , Ancient Egyptian iteru, Coptic piaro or phiaro) is a major north-flowing river in Africa, generally regarded as the longest river in the world. ...


In August 51 BC, relations between the sovereigns completely broke down. Cleopatra dropped Ptolemy's name from official documents and her face appeared alone on coins, which went against Ptolemaic tradition of female rulers being subordinate to male co-rulers. This resulted in a cabal of courtiers, led by the eunuch Pothinus, removing Cleopatra from power and making Ptolemy sole ruler in circa 48 BC (or possibly earlier, as a decree exists from 51 BC with Ptolemy's name alone). She tried to raise a rebellion around Pelusium, but she was soon forced to flee Egypt with her only surviving sister, Arsinoë.[1] European illustration of a Eunuch (1749) Chief Eunuch of Ottoman Sultan Abdul Hamid II at the Imperial Palace, 1912. ... Pothinus (early 1st Century BC - 48 or 47 BC) was regent for Pharaoh Ptolemy XIII of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Ancient Egypt. ... Pelusium is a city in the eastern extremes of Egypts Nile Delta, 30 km to the southeast of Port Said. ... Arsinoe IV (c. ...


Cleopatra and Julius Caesar

Assassination of Pompey

While Cleopatra was in exile, Pompey became embroiled in the Roman civil war. In the autumn of 48 BC, Pompey fled from the forces of Julius Caesar to Alexandria, seeking sanctuary. Ptolemy, only fifteen years old at that time, had set up a throne for himself on the harbour from where he watched as on September 28, 48 BC Pompey was murdered by one of his former officers, now in Ptolemaic service. He was beheaded in front of his wife and children, who were on the ship he had just disembarked from. Ptolemy is thought to have ordered the death as a way of pleasing Julius Caesar and thus become an ally of Rome, to which Egypt was in debt. This was a catastrophic miscalculation on Ptolemy's part. When Caesar arrived in Egypt two days later, Ptolemy presented him with Pompey's severed head. Caesar was enraged. This was probably due to the fact that, although he was Caesar's political enemy, Pompey was a Consul of Rome and the widower of Caesar's only legitimate daughter, Julia (who died in childbirth with their son). Caesar seized the Egyptian capital and imposed himself as arbiter between the rival claims of Ptolemy and Cleopatra. For other meanings see Pompey (disambiguation). ... Combatants Julius Caesar and supporters, the Populares faction, Roman senate, the Optimates faction, Commanders Julius Caesar Pompey†, Titus Labienus†, Metellus Scipio†, Cato the younger†, Gnaeus Pompeius† Sextus Pompeius The Roman civil war of 49 BC, sometimes called Caesars Civil War, is one of the last conflicts within the Roman... For other meanings see Pompey (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Consuls: Gaius Julius Caesar, Publius Servilius Vatia Isauricus. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... For other meanings see Pompey (disambiguation). ... This list of Republican Roman Consuls is based on the Varronian chronology, which intercalates four dictator years and has other peculiarities. ... Alternate uses: see widow (typesetting). ... Julia Caesaris (Classical Latin: IVLIA•CAESARIS) was the daughter of Gaius Julius Caesar the dictator, by Cornelia Cinna, and his only child in marriage. ...


Caesar and Caesarion

Bust of Cleopatra

Eager to take advantage of Julius Caesar's anger with Ptolemy, Queen Cleopatra returned to the palace rolled into a Persian carpet and had it presented to Caesar by her servants: when it was unrolled, Cleopatra tumbled out. It is believed that Caesar was charmed by the gesture, and she became his mistress. Nine months after their first meeting, Cleopatra gave birth to their baby. It was at this point that Caesar abandoned his plans to annex Egypt, instead backing Cleopatra's claim to the throne. After a short civil war, Ptolemy XIII was drowned in the Nile and Caesar restored Cleopatra to her throne, with another younger brother Ptolemy XIV as new co-ruler. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... The Persian carpet (Pahlavi bōb[1] Persian farš فرش, meaning to spread and Arabic qāli, Turkish hali)[2] is an essential part of Persian art and culture. ... The Nile (Arabic: , transliteration: , Ancient Egyptian iteru, Coptic piaro or phiaro) is a major north-flowing river in Africa, generally regarded as the longest river in the world. ... Ptolemy XIV (lived 60 BC/59 BC - 44 BC, reigned 47 BC - 44 BC), a son of Ptolemy XII of Egypt was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ...


Despite the almost thirty year age difference, Cleopatra and Caesar became lovers during his stay in Egypt between 48 BC and 47 BC. They met when they were 21 (Cleopatra) and 50 (Caesar). On 23 June 47 BC Cleopatra gave birth to a child, Ptolemy Caesar (nicknamed "Caesarion" which means "little Caesar"). Cleopatra claimed Caesar was the father and wished him to name the boy his heir, but Caesar refused, choosing his grand-nephew Octavian instead. Caesarion was the intended inheritor of Egypt and Rome, uniting the East and the West. is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 52 BC 51 BC 50 BC 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC... A relief of Cleopatra and Caesarion at the temple of Dendera, Egypt Ptolemy XV[1] Philopator Philometor Caesar, nicknamed Caesarion (little Caesar) Greek: Πτολεμαίος ΙΕ Φιλοπάτωρ Φιλομήτωρ Καίσαρ, Καισαρίων (June 23, 47 BC – August, 30 BC) was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned, as a child, jointly with his mother, Cleopatra... A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or things real name (for example, Nick is short for Nicholas). ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ...


Cleopatra and Caesarion visited Rome between 47 BC and 44 BC and were probably present when Caesar was assassinated on 15 March 44 BC. Before or just after the assassination she returned to Egypt. When Ptolemy XIV died due to deteriorating health, Cleopatra made Caesarion her co-regent and successor. To safeguard herself and Caesarion she also had her sister Arsinoe killed, a common practice of the times. is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC... A relief of Cleopatra and Caesarion at the temple of Dendera, Egypt Ptolemy XV[1] Philopator Philometor Caesar, nicknamed Caesarion (little Caesar) Greek: Πτολεμαίος ΙΕ Φιλοπάτωρ Φιλομήτωρ Καίσαρ, Καισαρίων (June 23, 47 BC – August, 30 BC) was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned, as a child, jointly with his mother, Cleopatra...


Cleopatra and Mark Antony

Anthony and Cleopatra, by Lawrence Alma-Tadema.
Anthony and Cleopatra, by Lawrence Alma-Tadema.

In 42 BC, Mark Antony, one of the triumvirs who ruled Rome in the power vacuum following Caesar's death, summoned Cleopatra to meet him in Tarsus to answer questions about her loyalty. Cleopatra arrived in great state, and so charmed Antony that he chose to spend the winter of 41 BC–40 BC with her in Alexandria. On 25 December 40 BC she gave birth to two children Alexander Helios and Cleopatra Selene II. Image File history File links Lawrence_Alma-Tadema-_Anthony_and_Cleopatra. ... Image File history File links Lawrence_Alma-Tadema-_Anthony_and_Cleopatra. ... Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, OM, RA (January 8, 1836, Dronrijp, the Netherlands. ... Bust of Mark Antony Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) ( January 14 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. ... ANT AV · III VIR RPC on this denarius minted by Mark Antony to pay his legions. ... Tarsus is a city in present day Turkey, on the mouth of the Tarsus Cay (Cydnus) into the Mediterranean. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 10s BC Years: 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC 40 BC 39 BC 38 BC 37... Alexander Helios (25 December 40 BC – ? ) was the son of Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Mark Antony, and the twin brother of Cleopatra Selene. ... Cleopatra Selene II (Greek:η Κλεοπάτρα Σελήνη, 25 December 40 BC-6), also known as Cleopatra VIII of Egypt was a Ptolemaic Princess and was the only daughter to Greek Ptolemaic Queen Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Roman Triumvir Mark Antony. ...


Four years later, in 37 BC, Antony visited Alexandria again en route to make war with the Parthians. He renewed his relationship with Cleopatra, and from this point on Alexandria would be his home. He married Cleopatra according to the Egyptian rite (a letter quoted in Suetonius suggests this), although he was at the time married to Octavia Minor, sister of his fellow triumvir Octavian. He and Cleopatra had four more children, including Ptolemy Philadelphus. Reproduction of a Parthian warrior as depicted on Trajans Column The Parthian Empire was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BCE and 224 CE. Origins Bust of Parthian soldier, Esgh-abad Museum, Turkmenia. ... The Twelve Caesars is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Octavia Minor (69 - 11 BC), also known as Octavia the Younger or simply Octavia, was the sister of the first Roman Emperor, Augustus, and half sister of Octavia Thurina Major. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Ptolemy Philadelphus (Greek: ο Πτολεμαίος Φιλάδελφος, August/September 36 BC - 29 BC) was a Ptolemaic Prince and was the youngest child of Greek Ptolemaic Queen Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Roman Triumvir Mark Antony. ...


At the Donations of Alexandria in late 34 BC, following Antony's conquest of Armenia, Cleopatra and Caesarion were crowned co-rulers of Egypt and Cyprus; Alexander Helios was crowned ruler of Armenia, Media, and Parthia; Cleopatra Selene II was crowned ruler of Cyrenaica and Libya; and Ptolemy Philadelphus was crowned ruler of Phoenicia, Syria, and Cilicia. Cleopatra also took the title of Queen of Kings. Alexander Helios (25 December 40 BC – ? ) was the son of Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Mark Antony, and the twin brother of Cleopatra Selene. ... Parthia[1] (Middle Persian: اشکانیان Ashkâniân) was a civilization situated in the northeast of modern Iran, but at its height covering all of Iran proper, as well as regions of the modern countries of Armenia, Iraq, Georgia, eastern Turkey, eastern Syria, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Kuwait, the Persian Gulf... The Roman Empire ca. ... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon and Syria. ... The Kingdom of Cilician Armenia, 1199-1375. ...


Antony's behavior was considered outrageous by the Romans, and Octavian convinced the Senate to levy war against Egypt. In 31 BC Antony's forces faced the Romans in a naval action off the coast of Actium. Cleopatra was present with a fleet of her own. Popular legend tells us that when she saw that Antony's poorly equipped and manned ships were losing to the Romans' superior vessels, she took flight and that Antony abandoned the battle to follow her, but no contemporary evidence states this was the case. Combatants Octavian Mark Antony, Cleopatra VII of Egypt Commanders Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa Mark Antony Strength 260 warships, mostly liburnian vessels 220 warships, mostly quinqueremes and 60 egyptian warships Casualties Unknown Almost all of Antonys fleet The Battle of Actium was a naval battle of the Roman Civil War between...


Following the Battle of Actium, Octavian invaded Egypt. As he approached Alexandria, Antony's armies deserted to Octavian on August 12, 30 BC. Combatants Octavian Mark Antony, Cleopatra VII of Egypt Commanders Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa Mark Antony Strength 260 warships, mostly liburnian vessels 220 warships, mostly quinqueremes and 60 egyptian warships Casualties Unknown Almost all of Antonys fleet The Battle of Actium was a naval battle of the Roman Civil War between... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Octavian becomes Roman Consul for the fourth time. ...


There are a number of unverifiable but very famous stories about Cleopatra, of which one of the best known is that, at one of the lavish dinners she shared with Antony, she playfully bet him that she could spend ten million sesterces on a dinner. He accepted the bet. The next night, she had a conventional, unspectacular meal served; he was ridiculing this, when she ordered the second course — only a cup of strong vinegar. She then removed one of her priceless pearl earrings, dropped it into the vinegar, allowed it to dissolve, and drank the mixture. The earliest report of this story comes from Pliny the Elder and dates to about 100 years after the banquet described would have happened. The calcium carbonate in pearls does dissolve in vinegar, but slowly unless the pearl is first crushed.[2] The sestertius was an ancient Roman coin. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound, with the chemical formula CaCO3. ...


Death

a fictionalized depiction by Reginald Arthur (circa 1914)
a fictionalized depiction by Reginald Arthur (circa 1914)

Mark Antony committed suicide, having been told Cleopatra was dead. According to the doctor Olympus (an eye-witness), he was brought to Cleopatra's tomb and died in her arms. A few days later, on 12 August, Cleopatra also died by snakebite in the breast. The ancient sources generally agree that she had two asps hidden in a fig basket so as she was eating she would never know when she would die. Her two handmaidens died with her. Octavian, waiting in a building nearby, was informed of her death, and went to see for himself.[3] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Breast (disambiguation). ... Vipera aspis Asp is the modern - supposedly chosen by W. Shakespeare - form of aspis. ...


Cleopatra's son by Caesar, Caesarion, was proclaimed pharaoh by the Egyptians, but Octavian had already won. Caesarion was captured and executed, his fate reportedly sealed by Octavian's famous phrase: "Two Caesars are one too many." This ended not just the Hellenistic line of Egyptian pharaohs, but the line of all Egyptian pharaohs. The three children of Cleopatra and Antony were spared and taken back to Rome where they were taken care of by Antony's wife, Octavia Minor, who was also Octavian's sister. A relief of Cleopatra and Caesarion at the temple of Dendera, Egypt Ptolemy XV[1] Philopator Philometor Caesar, nicknamed Caesarion (little Caesar) Greek: Πτολεμαίος ΙΕ Φιλοπάτωρ Φιλομήτωρ Καίσαρ, Καισαρίων (June 23, 47 BC – August, 30 BC) was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned, as a child, jointly with his mother, Cleopatra... Octavia Minor (69 - 11 BC), also known as Octavia the Younger or simply Octavia, was the sister of the first Roman Emperor, Augustus, and half sister of Octavia Thurina Major. ...


Cleopatra in art, film, TV, and literature

Cleopatra's story has fascinated scores of writers and artists through the centuries. While she was a powerful political figure in her own right, it is likely that much of her appeal lay in her legend as a great seductress who was able to ally herself with two of the most powerful men (Julius Caesar and Mark Antony) of her time. Seduction is the process of deliberately enticing another person into an act (see motivation). ...


Literature: Drama

Among the more famous works on her:

Anthony and Cleopatra, by Lawrence Alma-Tadema. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... All for Love is a heroic drama by John Dryden written in 1678. ... John Dryden John Dryden (August 19 {August 9 O.S.}, 1631 - May 12 {May 1 O.S.}, 1700) was an influential English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright, who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles... Caesar and Cleopatra is a 1901 play by George Bernard Shaw. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... This article is about the poet Ahmed Shawqi. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Literature: Other

Cléopâtre is an opera in four acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Louis Payen. ... Jules Émile Frédéric Massenet (May 12, 1842 - August 13, 1912) was a French composer. ... Chaucer redirects here. ... The Legend of Good Women is a poem in the form of a dream vision by Geoffrey Chaucer. ... Victorien Sardou (September 5, 1831 - November 8, 1908) was a French dramatist. ... Cleopatra: Being an Account of the Fall and Vengeance of Harmachis is a novel written by the author H. Rider Haggard the author of King Solomons Mines and She. ... H. Rider Haggard, author Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ... Talbot Mundy was a British-born writer of adventure stories during the early twentieth century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Margaret George (born in 1943) is an American historian and historical novelist, writing historical biographies. ... This article is about the comic book series. ... Asterix and Cleopatra, the sixth book in the Asterix comic book series by René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo, was serialized in Pilote issues 215-257 in 1963. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Kristiana Gregory (b. ... Ides of March is an epistolatory novel by Thornton Wilder. ... An epistolary novel is a literary technique in which a novel is composed as a series of letters, although diary entries, newspaper clippings and other documents are sometimes used. ... Image:Thorntonwilderteeth. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ...

Films

Poster for the 1917 film
Poster for the 1917 film
Poster for the 1934 film
Poster for the 1934 film
Elizabeth Taylor as the title character in 1963's Cleopatra
Elizabeth Taylor as the title character in 1963's Cleopatra

The earliest Cleopatra-related motion picture was Antony and Cleopatra (1908) with Florence Lawrence as Cleopatra. The earliest film on Cleopatra as the main subject was Cleopatra, Queen of Egypt, starring Helen Gardner (1912). Image File history File links Cleopatra1917. ... Image File history File links Cleopatra1917. ... The 1917 Cleopatra was directed by J. Gordon Edwards and starred Theda Bara in the title role. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cleopatra is a 1934 film retelling the story of Cleopatra VII of Egypt. ... Image File history File links Image-1963_Cleopatra_trailer_screenshot_(35)2. ... Image File history File links Image-1963_Cleopatra_trailer_screenshot_(35)2. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1963 film. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... Antony and Cleopatra is a 1908 film starring Maurice Costello and Florence Lawrence in the title roles, based on William Shakespeares play of the same name. ... See also: 1907 in film 1908 1909 in film years in film film Events Thomas Edison formed the Motion Picture Patents Company, with goals of controlling production and distribution, raising theater admission prices, cooperating with censorship bodies, and preventing film stock from getting into the hands of nonmember producers. ... Florence Lawrence (b. ... See also: 1911 in film 1912 1913 in film years in film film Events Mack Sennett, who had previously worked as an actor and comedy director with D. W. Griffith, formed a new company, Keystone Studios, that played an important role in developing slapstick comedy. ...


Other films and TV movies inspired by the Queen of the Nile include:

Cleopatra (1917
Based on Émile Moreau's play Cléopatre, Sardou's play Cléopatre, and Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra. Starred Theda Bara (Cleopatra), Fritz Leiber (Caesar), Thurston Hall (Antony); directed by J. Gordon Edwards.
Cleopatra (1934
Oscar-winning Cecil B. DeMille epic. Starred Claudette Colbert (Cleopatra), Warren William (Caesar), Henry Wilcoxon (Antony).
Caesar and Cleopatra (1945
Oscar-nominated version of George Bernard Shaw's play of the same name. Starred Vivien Leigh (Cleopatra), Claude Rains (Caesar), Stewart Granger, Flora Robson; Leigh also played Cleopatra opposite then-husband's Laurence Olivier's Caesar in a later London stage version.
Serpent of the Nile (1953
Starred Rhonda Fleming (Cleopatra), Raymond Burr (Mark Antony), Michael Fox (Octavian).
Cléo de 5 à 7 (1961
French New Wave Feminist film by Agnes Varda about a contemporary beautiful Parisian, symbolizing Cleopatra, in the last 2 hours of her death.
Cleopatra (1963
Oscar-winning blockbuster most (in)famously remembered for the off-screen affair between Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton and the at-the-time massive $44 million cost — today just under $270 million —, making it the second most expensive film ever made (after War and Peace (1968)). Starred Elizabeth Taylor (Cleopatra), Rex Harrison (Caesar), Richard Burton (Antony).
Totò e Cleopatra (1963) 
An Italian comedy movie about Cleopatra and Mark Antony, who was played by the Italian actor Totò.
Carry On Cleo (1964
A parody of the American 1963 film, with Amanda Barrie as Cleopatra, Sid James as Mark Antony, and Kenneth Williams as Caesar.
Kureopatora (Cleopatra: Queen of Sex) (1970
A Japanese animated film by Osamu Tezuka. When released in the United States, the film was promoted as being X-rated in an attempt to cash in on the success of Fritz the Cat. In actuality, Cleopatra had not been submitted to the MPAA, and it is considered to be highly unlikely that it would have received an X rating if it had been submitted. The English subtitled version is said to be lost, but a clip from the dubbed version is available on YouTube.
The Notorious Cleopatra (1970) 
A grossly inaccurate sexploitation film by Harry Novak. In this version Cleopatra is stabbed to death in her tub by Mark Anthony.
Antony & Cleopatra (1974
Television production performed by London's Royal Shakespeare Company, shown in the US in 1975 to great critical acclaim. Starred Janet Suzman (Cleopatra), Richard Johnson (Antony), and Patrick Stewart (Enobarbus).
Miss Cleopatra (1990
A Pakistani movie in Punjabi starring the Babra Sharif.
Cleopatra (1999
Based on the book Memoirs of Cleopatra by Margaret George, it is less faithful to history than the earlier versions. Starred Leonor Varela (Cleopatra), Timothy Dalton (Caesar), Billy Zane (Antony).
Mission Cleopatra (2000
French film based on the comic book Astérix et Cléopatre by René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo. Starred Monica Bellucci (Cleopatra), Alain Chabat (Caesar), Christian Clavier, Gerard Depardieu.
Scooby-Doo! in Where's My Mummy? (2005
Scooby-Doo and the gang investigate the curse of Cleopatra.

The 1917 Cleopatra was directed by J. Gordon Edwards and starred Theda Bara in the title role. ... See also: 1916 in film 1917 1918 in film years in film film Events Technicolor is introduced Top grossing films Cleopatra Movies released Movies released in 1917 include: The Adventurer, a Charlie Chaplin short. ... Theda Bara was the stage name of Theodosia Burr Goodman (July 29, 1885 - April 13, 1955), a silent film actress. ... Fritz Reuter Leiber Sr. ... Thurston Hall (10 May 1882 – 20 February 1958), was an American film actor. ... J. Gordon Edwards, 1919-2004 Author, A Climbers Guide to Glacier National Park, emeritus professor of Biology, San Jose State University. ... Cleopatra is a 1934 film retelling the story of Cleopatra VII of Egypt. ... See also: 1933 in film 1934 1935 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 26 - Samuel Goldwyn (of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) finally purchased the film rights to The Wizard of Oz from Frank J. Baum for $40,000. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Cecil Blount DeMille (August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was one of the most successful filmmakers during the first half of the 20th century. ... Claudette Colbert (September 13, 1903 – July 30, 1996) was an Academy Award-winning French-born American actress. ... Warren William (2 December 1894 - 24 September 1948) was a Broadway and Hollywood actor, born Warren William Krech in Aitkin, Minnesota. ... Wilcoxon played the part of the priest in Caddyshack The Crusades box cover This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Caesar and Cleopatra is a 1945 film starring Claude Rains and Vivien Leigh, produced by Gabriel Pascal from the 1901 play by George Bernard Shaw. ... // Paramount Studios releases theatrical short cartoon titled The Friendly Ghost, featuring ghost named Casper With Rossellinis Roma Città aperta, Italian neorealist cinema begins. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... Caesar and Cleopatra is a 1901 play by George Bernard Shaw. ... Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award winning English actress. ... Claude Rains (November 10, 1889 – May 30, 1967) was a British-born theatre and film actor, who later held American citizenship, best known for his many roles in Hollywood films. ... Stewart Granger (May 6, 1913 – August 16, 1993) was an English film actor, mainly associated with heroic and romantic leading roles. ... Flora Robson (March 28, 1902 - July 7, 1984) was a British actress renowned as one of the great character players and one of Britains theatrical grandes dames. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM, (IPA: ; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Serpent of the Nile is a historical, adventure film made in 1953. ... The year 1953 in film involved some significant events. ... Rhonda Fleming Rhonda Fleming (born August 10, 1923), nicknamed the Queen of Technicolor, is an American actress. ... Raymond William Stacey Burr (May 21, 1917 – September 12, 1993) was an Emmy-nominated actor and vintner, perhaps best known for his roles in the television dramas Perry Mason and Ironside. ... Michael Fox (February 27, 1921-1996) was an American character actor born in Yonkers, New York. ... Cléo from 5 to 7 (French: Cléo de 5 à 7) is a 1962 film by Agnès Varda. ... The year 1961 in film involved some significant events. ... Agn s Varda (born May 30, 1928) is a French filmmaker and director based in Paris and one of the key figures in modern film. ... This article is about the 1963 film. ... The year 1963 in film involved some significant events. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... War and Peace (Russian: Война и мир; Vojna i mir) is a Soviet-produced film adaptation of the Leo Tolstoys novel War and Peace. ... Sir Reginald Carey Rex Harrison, KBE (5 March 1908 – 2 June 1990) was an Academy Award- and Tony Award-winning English theatre and film actor. ... A comedy film is a film laced with humor or that may seek to provoke laughter from the audience. ... Antonio De Curtis Totò was the stage name of Antonio de Curtis (born Antonio Clemente, February 15, 1898, Naples – April 15, 1967, Rome), an Italian actor, writer, and songwriter. ... Carry On Cleo is the tenth film in the Carry On film series. ... // Events January 29 - The film Dr. Strangelove is released. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Amanda Barrie (born Shirley Anne Broadbent on 14 September 1935 in Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire) is an English actress. ... Sid James Sid James (8 May 1913–26 April 1976) was a film and television actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kureopatora is a 1970 Japanese animated film directed by Osamu Tezuka and Eiichi Yamamoto. ... // Events February 11 - The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr premieres in New York City. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... Tezuka redirects here. ... X-rated, X certificate, X classification or similar terms are labels for movies implying strong adult content, typically pornography or violence. ... Fritz the Cat is a 1972 animated film written and directed by Ralph Bakshi as his feature film debut. ... MPAA redirects here. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ... The Notorious Cleopatra is a grossly inaccurate sexploitation film, made in 1970 by Harry Novak. ... Sexploitation is a term that was first used in the 1940s which describes media that is merely an excuse to purvey sex. ... Harry Novak, the sexploitation king, produced a prolific number of exploitation films from the early 60s to the mid-70s. ... See also: 1973 in film 1974 1975 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 7 - Blazing Saddles is released in USA May 1 - George Lucas creates the first draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) is a British theatre company. ... // January 28 - George Lucas creates the second draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... Janet Suzman (born February 9, 1939) is a South African actress. ... Richard Johnson (born July 30, 1927) is a British actor, writer and producer, who starred in several British films of the 1960s and has also had a distinguished stage career. ... This article is about the actor. ... The year 1990 in film involved some significant events. ... “Punjabi” redirects here. ... Babra Sharif Babra Sharif was the foremost figure in the Pakistani film industry during the 1980s and late 1970s. ... Cleopatra, the 1999 film is a fictional portrayal of the Egyptian queen Cleopatra, produced by Hallmark Entertainment and starring Leonor Varela as the title character, Timothy Dalton as (Caesar), Billy Zane as (Antony) and Rupert Graves as (Octavius). ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... Margaret George (born in 1943) is an American historian and historical novelist, writing historical biographies. ... Leonor Varela (born December 29, 1972) is a Chilean actress. ... Timothy Peter Dalton (born March 21, 1946[1]) is an English actor of stage and screen, best known for portraying James Bond in The Living Daylights (1987) and Licence to Kill (1989) and in his roles in Shakespearean related films and plays. ... William George Billy Zane, Jr. ... The year 2000 in film involved some significant events. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Asterix and Cleopatra, the sixth book in the Asterix comic book series by René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo, was serialized in Pilote issues 215-257 in 1963. ... René Goscinny (August 14, 1926 – November 5, 1977) was a French author, editor and humorist, who is best known for the comic book Astérix, which he created with illustrator Albert Uderzo, and for his work on the early issues of the comic book series Lucky Luke with Morris. ... Albert Uderzo Albert Uderzo (born April 25, 1927 in France) is a French comic book artist, and scriptwriter. ... Monica Anna Maria Bellucci (born September 30, 1964) is an Italian actress and former fashion model. ... Alain Chabat (born November 24, 1958 in Oran, Algeria) is a French actor who appeared in La Cité de la peur, The Taste of Others and The Science of Sleep. ... Christian Clavier is a French actor born May 6, 1952 in Paris. ... Gérard Depardieu (born December 27, 1948) is a French actor. ... UK DVD cover Scooby-Doo in Wheres My Mummy? is the ninth Scooby-Doo direct-to-video animated film. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2005. ...

Television

Cleopatra (Lyndsey Marshal) and the snake from HBO's Rome
Cleopatra (Lyndsey Marshal) and the snake from HBO's Rome
  • (1993): An Animaniacs short featuring Rita and Runt also portrayed as sly, seductive Cleopatra dominating over a cowardly Mark Antony. The cartoon also pointed out the use of animal sacrifices in Ancient Egypt.
  • (19931995) in Legends of the Hidden Temple, one of the artifacts was the Snake Bracelet of Cleopatra.
  • (1998): Histeria! frequently featured Cleopatra, usually portrayed by a tanned World's Oldest Woman or, if she were being portrayed as attractive, Pepper Mills.
  • (20022003): Clone High, Cleopatra was featured on Clone High as one of the main characters. In the show, Cleopatra is portrayed as beautiful and popular.
  • (2005/2007): A version of Cleopatra appears in the HBO/BBC series Rome, portrayed by Lyndsey Marshal. She is introduced (along with brother Ptolemy XIII) in the Season 1 episode Caesarion, which begins with Pompey's assassination and ends with the birth of Caesarion. Cleopatra also appears in four episodes in Season 2, in which she makes an enemy of Atia of the Julii (Polly Walker) and later allies with Mark Antony (James Purefoy). The series finale features Antony and Cleopatra's deaths, and Octavia taking in the twins (Ptolemy Philadelphus is not acknowledged in the series). Rome also invents a subplot in which Caesarion is eventually revealed to actually be Cleopatra's son with lowly Roman soldier Titus Pullo, who saves the boy from execution by telling Octavian that he murdered Caesarion.
  • Cleopatra was featured twice in Xena: Warrior Princess. She was played by Gina Torres in her first appearance then by Josephine Davison in her second.
  • Lebanese actor and singer Carole Samaha takes the role of Cleopatra in a TV serie " women in history " aired on the " Lebanese broadcasting corporation "

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cleopatra is a fictional character from the HBO/BBC original television series Rome, played by Lyndsey Marshal. ... Lyndsey Marshal began her career as a theatrical performer. ... For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... Rome is a multiple Emmy Award-winning historical drama, produced in Italy for television by the BBC (UK), HBO (USA), and RAI (Italy). ... The year 1993 in television involved some significant events. ... This article is about the television series. ... Runt Rita and Runt were the stars of several musical segments in the animated television series Animaniacs. ... Bust of Mark Antony Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) ( January 14 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. ... The year 1993 in television involved some significant events. ... This is a list of television-related events in 1995. ... Legends of the Hidden Temple is a physical challenge game show hosted by Kirk Fogg that aired on Nickelodeon from 1993 to 1995. ... The year 1998 in television involved some significant events. ... Histeria! was an animated television series of the late-1990s, created by Tom Ruegger (who also created Tiny Toon Adventures, Animaniacs, and Pinky and the Brain) at Warner Bros. ... The Worlds Oldest Woman is a fictional character featured on the Warner Bros. ... Pepper Mills is a fictional character created for the Warner Bros. ... The year 2002 in television involved some significant events. ... The year 2003 in television involved some significant events. ... Clone High (occasionally referred to in the U.S. as Clone High U.S.A.) is an American animated series that aired for one season (November 2002 — April 2003) on MTV and Teletoon. ... Cleo on Clone High Cleopatra Cleo Smith is a fictional animated character from Clone High, voiced by Christa Miller. ... The year 2005 in television involved some significant events. ... The year 2007 in television involves some significant events. ... Cleopatra is a fictional character from the HBO/BBC original television series Rome, played by Lyndsey Marshal. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Rome is a multiple Emmy Award-winning historical drama, produced in Italy for television by the BBC (UK), HBO (USA), and RAI (Italy). ... Lyndsey Marshal began her career as a theatrical performer. ... Rome title design There are several minor but significant characters featured in the HBO television series Rome. ... Caesarion is the eighth episode of the first season of the television series Rome. ... This page is a about a character from the television series Rome, produced as a joint project of HBO and the BBC. You may wish to refer to the index of the shows Characters and Cast as well. ... Rome title design There are several minor but significant characters featured in the HBO television series Rome. ... Atia of the Julii is a character from the HBO/BBC2 original television series Rome, played by Polly Walker. ... Polly Walker (born 19 May 1966 in Warrington, Lancashire, England) is an English actress. ... This page is a about a character from the television series Rome, produced as a joint project of HBO and the BBC. You may wish to refer to the index of the shows Characters and Cast as well. ... James Purefoy (born June 3, 1964) is an English actor born in Taunton, Somerset. ... Octavia of the Julii is a fictional character in the HBO/BBC2 original television series Rome, played by Irish actress Kerry Condon. ... Titus Pullo is a fictional character from the HBO/BBC original television series Rome, played by Ray Stevenson. ... Gaius Octavian is a character in the HBO/BBC2 original television series Rome, played by Max Pirkis, in the second season he will eventually be played by Simon Woods. ... Xena. ... Gina Torres (born April 25, 1969) is an American television and movie actress. ...

Opera

  • Kleopatra by Slovenian composer Danilo Švara

HANDEL was the code-name for the UKs National Attack Warning System in the Cold War. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Carl Heinrich Graun. ... Johann Adolph Hasse. ... Jules Massenet Jules (Émile Frédéric) Massenet (May 12, 1842 – August 13, 1912) was a French composer. ... Cléopâtre is an opera in four acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Louis Payen. ... Johann Mattheson (September 28, 1681 – April 17, 1764) was a German composer, writer, lexicographer, and music theorist. ... Cleopatras Night is a short opera in two acts by American composer Henry Kimball Hadley. ... Henry Kimball Hadley (December 20, 1871 – September 6, 1937) was an American composer and conductor. ... Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier (August 31, 1811 - October 23, 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist and literary critic. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... Antony and Cleopatra is an opera in three acts by Samuel Barber. ... Samuel Barber, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1944 Samuel Osborne Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981) was an American composer of classical music ranging from orchestral, to opera, choral, and piano music. ... The Metropolitan Opera is located at Lincoln Center in New York, New York. ...

Ballet

  • One More Gaudy Night (1961) by American choreographer Martha Graham

For the supercentenarian, see Martha Graham (supercentenarian). ...

Video games

Double Dragon (spelled in kanji as 双截龍) is a classic beat em up video game series initially developed by Technos Japan Corporation, who also developed the Nekketsu Kouha: Kunio-Kun series. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... Bill & Teds Excellent Video Game Adventure is the title of a video game released for the Nintendo Entertainment System. ... “NES” redirects here. ... Pharaoh and Cleopatra is an isometric city-building game set in Ancient Egypt created by Impressions Games and published by Sierra Entertainment for Windows-based computers . ...

Ancient art—triumph painting, sculpture

The most famous painting of Cleopatra is one that almost certainly no longer exists now. Because the queen died in Egypt well before Augustus' triumph could be put on in Rome, in which she would have walked in chains, Augustus commissioned a large painting of her, which was carried in his triumphal procession, and which may have represented her being poisoned by an asp. The sources for the story are Plut. Ant. 86 and App. Civ. II.102, although the latter may well refer to a statue, and Cass. Dio LI.21.3 reports that the "image" was of gold, and thus not a painting at all. A painting purported to be this work was engraved in the early 19th century: it was said to be in a private collection near Sorrento. Since then, this painting is said to have formed part of a collection in Cortona, but there no longer appears to be any trace of it; its quiet disappearance is almost certainly due to its being a fake. For comprehensive details on the entire question, see the external links at the end of this article. For other uses, see Sorrento (disambiguation). ... André Rieu Concert in Piazza Della Republica, Cortona Cortona is a small town in Tuscany, Italy. ...


Paintings, Renaissance onwards

Cleopatra and her death have inspired hundreds of paintings from the Renaissance to our own time, none of them of any historical value of course, and most misleadingly depict her as a young woman at the time of her death; the subject appealing in particular to French academic painters. This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ...

The suicide

  • Cleopatra, painted by Artemesia Gentileschi,1621-22, of the artist's Genovese period. Pictures the queen in the act of committing suicide. Oil on Canvas. Hangs in the Amedeo Morandorri, Milan.
  • The Death of Cleopatra, painted by Jean André Rixens, painted in 1874 and that hangs in the Musée des Augustins in Toulouse, France.
The Death of Cleopatra, Guido Cagnacci, 1658
  • The Death of Cleopatra, painted by Guido Cagnacci, painted in 1658. Oil on canvas. Hanging in the Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum.

An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude this page lists areas between 1 m² and 10 m². Areas smaller than 1 m² 1. ... The Italian painter Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (1591—1666) known as Guercino, was born at Cento, a village not far from Bologna. ... The Norton Simon Museum is an art museum located in Pasadena, California, originally known by several other names. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Self-portrait (1630s) Artemisia Gentileschi (July 8, 1593 - 1653) was an Italian Early Baroque painter, today considered one of the most accomplished painters in the generation influenced by Caravaggio (Caravaggisti). ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN... Self-portrait (1630s) Artemisia Gentileschi (July 8, 1593 - 1653) was an Italian Early Baroque painter, today considered one of the most accomplished painters in the generation influenced by Caravaggio (Caravaggisti). ... Ferrara is a city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, capital city of the province of Ferrara. ... Musée des Augustins in Toulouse The Musée des Augustins de Toulouse, sited in a Gothic convent in Toulouse, France, conserves a collection of sculpture and paintings from the Middle Ages to the early twentieth century. ... New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Midi-Pyrénées Department Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City Statistics Land... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (997x892, 122 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Cleopatra VII of Egypt ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (997x892, 122 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Cleopatra VII of Egypt ... Guido Cagnacci ( 1601-1663) was a late Baroque painter of the Bolognese School. ... Guido Cagnacci ( 1601-1663) was a late Baroque painter of the Bolognese School. ...

Other

  • The Banquet of Cleopatra (1743–5). Oil on Canvas, 248.2 x 357.8cm. Painted by Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770), which hangs in the National Gallery of Victoria, Australia, depicting the banquet in which Cleopatra dissolves her pearl earring in a glass of vinegar.
  • Cleopatra and Caesar (Cléopâtre et César) (1866). Oil on canvas. Painted by Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824–1904). The original painting has been lost, and only copies remain. The work depicts Cleopatra standing before a seated Caesar, painted in the Orientalist style.
  • Omnium a CD and stage performance made for Teatro ZinZanni with Lyrics and Music by Martha Davis of The Motels and Teatro ZinZanni's Maestro Norm Durkee. It is part musical and sung narrative based on the life and romances of Cleopatra with Caesar and Mark Anthony.

Look up Canvas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Death of Hyacinth Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (March 5, 1696 - March 27, 1770) was a Venetian painter. ... Italic textLink titlelink title Headline text Media:Example. ... For other uses, see Pearl (disambiguation). ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Pollice Verso by Jean-Léon Gérôme, 1872, is the immediate source of the thumbs down gesture in popular culture. ... For the book by Edward Said, see Orientalism (book). ... Omnium Cover: Front; showing Gabrielle Bakker painting called Actors and Back; Martha Davis in Cleopatra outfit. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Motels were a New Wave music band from the Los Angeles area best known for Only the Lonely and Suddenly, Last Summer, both of which peaked at #9 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1982 and 1983, respectively. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Peter Green (1990). Alexander to Actium: The Historical Evolution of the Hellenistic Age. Berkeley: University of California Press, 661–664. ISBN 0-520-05611-6. 
  2. ^ Ullman, Berthold L. (1957). "Cleopatra's Pearls". The Classical Journal 52 (5): 193-201. 
  3. ^ Smith, William (ed.) (1867). Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. Boston: Little, Brown & Company, 802. 

Peter Green (born 1924) is a British classical scholar noted for his Alexander to Actium, a general account of the Hellenistic Age, and other works. ... Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ... Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is a encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

General

Jacob Abbott (November 14, 1803 – October 31, 1879) was an American writer of childrens books. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

Paintings of Cleopatra

Preceded by
Ptolemy XII
Ptolemaic Queen of Egypt
with Ptolemy XII, Ptolemy XIII, Ptolemy XIV, and Ptolemy XV
Succeeded by
Roman province
Persondata
NAME Philopator, Cleopatra Selene
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Cleopatra VII
SHORT DESCRIPTION Queen of Egypt
DATE OF BIRTH January, 69 BC
PLACE OF BIRTH Alexandria
DATE OF DEATH 12 August 30 BC
PLACE OF DEATH Alexandria

Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos Theos Philopator Theos Philadelphos (New Dionysus, God Beloved of his Father, God Beloved of his Brother) (117 BCE - 51 BCE) was son of Ptolemy IX Soter II. His mother is unknown. ... cleopatra ruled seneca for 10 years before she ruled Egypt. ... Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos Theos Philopator Theos Philadelphos (New Dionysus, God Beloved of his Father, God Beloved of his Brother) (117 BCE - 51 BCE) was son of Ptolemy IX Soter II. His mother is unknown. ... Ptolemy XIII Theos Philopator (lived 62 BCE/61 BCE–January 13, 47 BCE?, reigned from 51 BCE) was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ... Ptolemy XIV (lived 60 BC/59 BC - 44 BC, reigned 47 BC - 44 BC), a son of Ptolemy XII of Egypt was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ... A relief of Cleopatra and Caesarion at the temple of Dendera, Egypt Ptolemy XV[1] Philopator Philometor Caesar, nicknamed Caesarion (little Caesar) Greek: Πτολεμαίος ΙΕ Φιλοπάτωρ Φιλομήτωρ Καίσαρ, Καισαρίων (June 23, 47 BC – August, 30 BC) was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned, as a child, jointly with his mother, Cleopatra... The Roman Empire 120, with Aegyptus province highlighted See Egypt Province for the province of the Ottoman Empire. ... ... The Early Dynastic Period of Egypt is taken to include the First and Second Dynasties, lasting from 2920 BC, following the Protodynastic Period of Egypt, until 2575 BC, or the beginning of the Old Kingdom. ... Narmer was an Egyptian pharaoh who ruled in the 31st century BC. Thought to be the successor to the predynastic Serket, he is considered by some to be the founder of the First dynasty, and therefore the first pharaoh of all Egypt. ... Hor-Aha was the 2nd Pharaoh of the 1st dynasty of Ancient Egypt. ... This article is about the Pharaoh. ... Image File history File links Ankh. ... The Old Kingdom is the name commonly given to that period in the 3rd millennium BC when Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization in complexity and achievement – this was the first of three so-called Kingdom periods, which mark the high points of civilization in the lower Nile... Netjerikhet Consort(s) Inetkawes, Hetephernebti Unknown Father Khasekhemwy? Mother Nimaethap? Major Monuments Pyramid of Djoser Netjerikhet Djoser (Turin King List Dsr-it; Manetho Tosarthros) is the best-known pharaoh of the Third dynasty of Egypt, for commissioning the official Imhotep to build his Step Pyramid at Saqqara. ... Sneferu He of Beauty[1] Horus name Neb-maat[2] Nebty name Neb-maat-nebty[2] Golden Horus Bik-nub[2] Consort(s) Hetepheres I Issues Khufu Father Huni Mother Meresankh I Died 2589 BC Major Monuments Bent Pyramid, Red Pyramid Sneferu, also spelt as Snefru or Snofru (in Greek... Khufu Protected by Khnum[1] Horus name Medjedu Nebty name Nebty-r-medjed Golden Horus Bikwy-nub Consort(s) Meritates, Henutsen, plus two other queens whose names are not known[2] Issue Djedefra, Kawab, Khafre, Djedefhor, Banefre, Khufukaef, Hetepheres II, Meresankh II, Khamerernebty[2] Father Sneferu Mother Hetepheres I Died... The Pyramid of Khafra and the Great Sphinx of Giza Portrait of Khafra, originally found at Mit Rahina, now residing in the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo. ... Men-kau-re[1] Eternal like the Souls of Re Nomen Consort(s) Khamerernebty II Issues Khuenre, Shepseskaf, Khentkawes Father Khafre Mother Khamaerernebty I Died 2504 BC Burial Pyramid at Giza Major Monuments Pyramid at Giza Menkaura (or Men-Kau-Re; Mycerinus in Latin; Mykerinos in Greek) was a pharaoh... nomen or birth name Pepi II (c. ... The Middle Kingdom is the period in the history of ancient Egypt stretching from the establishment of the Eleventh Dynasty to the end of the Fourteenth Dynasty, roughly between 2030 BC and 1640 BC. The period comprises two phases, the 11th Dynasty, which ruled from Thebes and the 12th Dynasty... nomen or birth name Nebhotepre Mentuhotep II (2046-1995 BCE) was a Pharaoh of the 11th dynasty, the son of Intef III of Egypt and a minor queen called Iah. ... nomen or birth name Nebtawyre Mentuhotep IV was the last king of the 11th Dynasty. ... Khakhaure (The king of the two lands, The kas of Ra have appeared) Nomen Senusret (The son of Ra, man of the strong one) Horus name Netcher Kheperu (Horus, divine of form) Nebty name Netcher Mesut (The two ladies, divine of birth) Golden Horus Kheper (The golden Horus has... ny m3ˁt rˁ (Nimaatre)[1] Belonging to the truth of Re Nomen Amenemhat[1] Amun is in front Horus name Wahankh[1] Long of life Nebty name Itjijautawy[1] Who comes to the inheritance of the two lands Golden Horus ˁ3 ba(u) (Aabaw)[1] Great of power Issues... Sobek-kare Sobek is the Ka of Re Nomen Sobekneferu The beauties of Sobek Horus name Meritra Beloved of Re Nebty name Satsekhem Nebettawy Daughter of the powerful one, Mistress of the two lands Golden Horus Djedetkhau Established of crowns Died 1802 BC Sobekneferu (sometimes written Nefrusobek) was an Egyptian... The New Kingdom is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BCE and the 11th century BC, covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of Egypt. ... Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau [1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issue Neferure Father Thutmose I... Menkheperre Lasting is the Manifestation of Re[1] Nomen Thutmose Neferkheperu Thoth is born, beautiful of forms Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset Mighty Bull, Arising in Thebes Nebty name Wahnesytmireempet Enduring in kingship like Re in heaven Golden Horus Sekhempahtydsejerkhaw Powerful of strength, holy of diadems Consort(s) Hatshepsut-Meryetre, Nebtu... Nebmaatre The Lord of Truth is Re[2] Nomen Amenhotep Hekawaset Amun is Satisfied, Ruler of Thebes[1] Horus name Kanakht Emkhaimaat The strong bull, appearing in truth Nebty name Semenhepusegerehtawy One establishing laws, pacifying the two lands Golden Horus Aakhepesh-husetiu Great of valour, smiting the Asiatics Consort(s... For other uses, see Akhenaten (disambiguation). ... Nebkheperure Lord of the forms of Re Nomen Tutankhaten Living Image of the Aten Tutankhamun Hekaiunushema Living Image of Amun, ruler of Upper Heliopolis Horus name Kanakht Tutmesut The strong bull, pleasing of birth Nebty name Neferhepusegerehtawy One of perfect laws, who pacifies the two lands[2] Wer-Ah-Amun... Menpehtyre Eternal is the Strength of Re[2] Nomen Ra-messes Re has fashioned him[1] Consort(s) Queen Sitre Issue Seti I Died 1290 BC Burial KV16 Menpehtyre Ramesses I (traditional English: Ramesses or Rameses ) was the founding Pharaoh of Ancient Egypts 19th dynasty. ... Menmaatre Eternal is the Strength of Re[1] Nomen Seti Merenptah He of the god Seth, beloved of Ptah[2] Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset-Seankhtawy Nebty name Wehemmesut Sekhemkhepesh Derpedjetpesdjet Golden Horus Wehemkhau Weserpedjutemtawnebu[3] Consort(s) Queen Tuya Issue Tia, Amennefernebes, Ramesses II, Henutmire (?) Father Ramesses I Mother Sitre... Usermaatre-setepenre The Justice of Re is Powerful, Chosen of Re Nomen Ramesses (meryamun) Born of Re, (Beloved of Amun) Horus name [2] Kanakht Merymaa Golden Horus [2] Userrenput-aanehktu[1] Consort(s) Henutmire, Isetnofret, Nefertari Maathorneferure Issue Bintanath, Khaemweset, Merneptah, Amun-her-khepsef, Meritamen see also: List of children... Hedjkheperre Setepenre Nomen Shoshenq Hedjkheperre Setepenre Shoshenq I (Egyptian ššnq), also known as Shishak, Sheshonk or Sheshonq I (for discussion of the spelling, see Shoshenq), was a Meshwesh Libyan king of Egypt and founder of the Twenty-second Dynasty. ... Piye, whose name was once transliterated as Py(ankh)i. ... Taharqa (also spelled Tirhakah, Taharka, Manethos Tarakos) was king of Egypt, and a member of the Nubian or Twenty-fifth dynasty of Egypt, whose reign is usually dated 690 BC to 664 BC. He was also the son of Piye, the Nubian king of Napata who had first conquered... Wahibre Nomen Psamtik Horus name Aaib Nebty name Neba Golden Horus Qenu Issues Nitocris I Died 610 BC Burial Sais Psammetichus, or Psamtik I, was the first of three kings of the Saite, or Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt. ... Wahemibre Nomen Necho Horus name Maaib Nebty name Maakheru Golden Horus Merynetjeru Consort(s) Khedebarbenet Died 595 BC Necho II (or more accurately, Nekau II) was a king of the Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (610 - 595 BC), and the son of Psammetichus I. His prenomen or royal name Wahemibre... nomen or birth name Ankhkaenre Psammetichus III (Psamtik III) was the last Pharaoh of the Twenty-sixth Dynasty of Egypt, 526 BC–525 BC. He was defeated by King Cambyses II of Persia at Pelusium, carried to Susa in chains, and executed. ... Ptolemy I Soter (Greek: , Ptolemaios Soter, i. ... Ptolemy XIII (lived 62 BC/61 BC -January 13? 47 BC, reigned 51 BC - January 13?, 47 BC) was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ... Tetisheri was the matriarch of the Egyptian royal family of the late 17th Dynasty and early 18th Dynasty. ... Queen Ahmose-Nefertari of Egypt was the sister-wife of Egypts Pharaoh King Ahmose I. She had two children-Amenhotep I and Aahhotep II, who wed each other and had the Princess Aahmes. ... Queen Ahmose was the mother of Hatshepsut of Egypt. ... Tiye. ... Bust of Nefertiti from Berlins Altes Museum. ... Ankhesenamun, also known as Ankhesepaaten, was the third of six known daughters of the Pharaoh Akhenaten by his wife Nefertiti. ... A picture of Nefertari taken in her Abu Simbel temple. ... Bust of Mark Antony Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) ( January 14 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. ... This article is about the ancient Egyptian official. ... Weni the Elder was a court official of the 6th dynasty of Ancient Egypt. ... Ahmose, son of Ebana served in the Egyptian military under the pharaohs Tao II Seqenenre, Ahmose I, Amenhotep I, and Thutmose I. His autobiography has survived intact on the wall of his tomb and has proven a valuable source of information on the late 17th Dynasty and the early 18th... Ineofficial of the 18th Dynasty, responsible for major constructions un Egypt| Thutmose II]], Hatshepsut, and Thutmose III. Ineni came from an aristocratic family and likely began his career as an architect under Amenhotep I. Amenhotep I commissioned Ineni to expand the Temple of Karnak. ... Senemut was an 18th dynasty Ancient Egyptian architect and government official. ... Rekhmire was an 18th dynasty official, serving as Governor of the Town (Thebes) and Vizier during the reigns of Tuthmosis III and Amenhotep II. He is noted for constructing a lavishly decorated tomb for himself in the Valley of the Nobles, containing lively, well preserved scenes of daily life during... Yuya (sometimes Iouiya) also known as Yaa, Ya, Yiya, Yayi, Yu, Yuyu, Yaya, Yiay, Yia, Yuy[1] was a powerful Egyptian courtier of the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt (circa 1390 BC). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Maya (Egyptian official). ... Yuny was an official through the reign of Ramesses II, in the 19th Dynasty, serving as chief scribe of the court, the overseer of priests, and royal steward. ... Manetho, also known as Manethon of Sebennytos, was an Egyptian historian and priest from Sebennytos who lived during the Ptolematic era, circa 3rd century BC. Manetho recorded Aegyptiaca (History of Egypt). ... Pothinus (early 1st Century BC - 48 or 47 BC) was regent for Pharaoh Ptolemy XIII of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Ancient Egypt. ... cleopatra ruled seneca for 10 years before she ruled Egypt. ... For other uses, see January (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 74 BC 73 BC 72 BC 71 BC 70 BC 69 BC 68 BC 67 BC 66... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Octavian becomes Roman Consul for the fourth time. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cleopatra VII of Egypt - Academic Kids (1931 words)
Cleopatra VII Philopator (Κλεοπάτρα θεά φιλοπάτωρ, December, 70 BC or January, 69 BC–August 12?, 30 BC) was queen of ancient Egypt.
Cleopatra VII was Greek and born in Alexandria, Egypt, took the throne alone at the death of her father Ptolemy XII in spring 51 BC.
Cleopatra arrived in great state, and so charmed Antony that he chose to spend the winter of 42 BC–41 BC with her in Alexandria.
Cleopatra VII of Egypt Summary (3224 words)
Cleopatra VII Philopator (in Greek:Κλεοπάτρα Φιλοπάτωρ; January 69 BC – August 12 30 BC), later Cleopatra Thea Neotera Philopator kai Philopatris, was queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, the last member of the Ptolemaic dynasty and hence the last Hellenistic ruler of Egypt.
Cleopatra was a co-ruler of Egypt with her father (Ptolemy XII Auletes), her brothers/husbands Ptolemy XIII and Ptolemy XIV and later her son Ptolemy XV Caesarion.
She reigned as Queen Cleopatra and Pharaoh between 51 and 30 BC, and died at the age of 39 from the venom of an asp.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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