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Encyclopedia > Clemens Brentano

Clemens Brentano, or Klemens Brentano (September 8, 1778July 28, 1842) was a German poet and novelist. Scanned from German Meyers Encyclopedia, 1906 The copyright status of this vintage image is undetermined; it may still be copyrighted. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... July 28 is the 209th day (210th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 156 days remaining. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Poets are authors of poems, or of other forms of poetry such as dramatic verse. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ...


He was born at Ehrenbreitstein, near Koblenz, Germany. His sister was Bettina von Arnim, Goethe's correspondent. His father's family was of Italian descent. He studied in Halle and Jena, afterwards residing at Heidelberg, Vienna and Berlin. He was close to Wieland, Herder, Goethe, Friedrich Schlegel, Fichte and Tieck. redir Festung Ehrenbreitstein ... Koblenz (also Coblenz and the French Coblence) is after Mainz and Ludwigshafen am Rhein the third largest city in Rhineland-Palatinate (german Rheinland-Pfalz), Germany. ... Bettina von Arnim (4 April 1785, Frankfurt am Main – 20 January 1859, Berlin), born as Elisabeth Catharina Ludovica Magdalena Brentano, was a German writer and novelist. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tÉ™]) (August 28, 1749 – March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and literary philosopher. ... Map of Germany showing Halle Halle (also called Halle an der Saale in order to distinguish from Halle in North Rhine-Westphalia) is the largest town in the German Bundesland of Saxony-Anhalt. ... Map of Germany showing Jena Jena is a town in central Germany on the River Saale. ... Map of Germany showing Heidelberg Heidelberg (halfway between Stuttgart and Frankfurt) is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). ...   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... Christoph Martin Wieland (September 5, 1733 _ January 20, 1813), was a German poet and writer. ... Johann Gottfried Herder Johann Gottfried von Herder (August 25, 1744 - December 18, 1803), German poet, critic, theologian, and philosopher, is best known for his concept of the Volk and is generally considered the father of ethnic nationalism. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tÉ™]) (August 28, 1749 – March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and literary philosopher. ... Karl Wilhelm Friedrich von Schlegel (March 10, 1772 - January 11, 1829), German poet, critic and scholar, was the younger brother of August Wilhelm von Schlegel. ... Johann Gottlieb Fichte Johann Gottlieb Fichte (May 19, 1762 - January 27, 1814) has significance in the history of Western philosophy as one of the progenitors of German idealism and as a follower of Kant. ... Johann Ludwig Tieck (May 31, 1773 - April 28, 1853) was a German poet, translator, editor, novelist and critic, who was part of the Romantic movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. ...


In 1801, he moved to Göttingen, and became a friend of Achim von Arnim. In 1804, he moved to Heidelberg and worked with Arnim on Zeitungen für Einsiedler and Des Knaben Wunderhorn. In the years between 1808 and 1818, he lived mostly in Berlin, and from 1819 to 1824 in Dülmen, Westphalia. 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Landmark Gänseliesel fountain at the main market University Library SUB Göttingen (  listen) is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Ludwig Achim (or Joachim) von Arnim (January 26, 1781 – January 21, 1831), German poet and novelist, was born at Berlin. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Map of Germany showing Heidelberg Heidelberg (halfway between Stuttgart and Frankfurt) is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ...   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... 1819 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Dülmen is a city in the district Coesfeld, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ... Westphalia (in German, Westfalen) is a (historic) region in Germany, centred on the cities of Dortmund, Münster, Bielefeld, and Osnabrück and now included in the Bundesland of North Rhine-Westphalia (and the (south-)west of Lower Saxony). ...


In 1818, weary of his somewhat restless and unsettled life, he joined the Roman Catholic Church and withdrew to the monastery of Dülmen, where he lived for some years in strict seclusion. He took on there the position of secretary to the Catholic visionary, Sister Anne Catherine Emmerich, of whom it was said that, during the last 12 years of her life, she could eat no food except Holy Communion, nor take any drink except water, subsisting entirely on the Holy Eucharist. It was claimed that from 1802 until her death, she bore the wounds of the Crown of Thorns, and from 1812, the full stigmata, including a cross over her heart and the wound from the lance. Clement Brentano made her acquaintance, was converted to Catholicism, and remained at the foot of the stigmatist's bed copying her dictation without embellishment from l8l8-l824. When she died, he prepared an index of the visions from her journal, The Dolorous Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ. The Roman Catholic Church is the largest denomination of Christianity with over 1. ... Buddhist monastery near Tibet A monastery is the habitation of monks. ... Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich (8 September 1774 - 9 February 1824) was a Catholic Christian Augustinian nun, alleged stigmatic, and ecstatic. ... Alternate meanings: Crown-of-Thorns starfish In Christianity, the Crown of Thorns, one of the instruments of the Passion, was the woven chaplet of thorn branches worn by Jesus before his crucifixion. ...


The latter part of his life he spent in Regensburg, Frankfurt and Munich, actively engaged in Catholic propaganda. Brentano assisted Ludwig Achim von Arnim, his brotherin-law, in the collection of folk-songs forming Des Knaben Wunderhorn (1806-1808), which Gustav Mahler drew upon for his song cycle. He died at Aschaffenburg. Regensburg (English formerly Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona, Czech Řezno) is a city (population 146,824 in 2002) in Bavaria, south-east Germany, located at the confluence of the Danube and Regen rivers, at the northernmost bend in the Danube. ...   Frankfurt am Main? [ˈfraÅ‹kfÊŠrt] is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German state of Bavaria. ... Des Knaben Wunderhorn (The Young Boys Magic Horn) is a collection of German folk poems collected by Achim von Arnim and Clemens von Brentano and published in the 1800s. ... Gustav Mahler Gustav Mahler (July 7, 1860–May 18, 1911) was a Bohemian-Austrian composer and conductor. ... Map of Germany showing Aschaffenburg Aschaffenburg is a city in Bavaria, Germany. ...


Brentano, whose early writings were published under the pseudonym Maria, belonged to the Heidelberg group of German romantic writers, and his works are marked by excess of fantastic imagery and by abrupt, bizarre modes of expression. His first published writings were Satiren und poetische Spiele (1800), and a romance Godwi (1801-1802); of his dramas the best are Ponce de Leon (1804), Victoria (1817) and Die Grundung Prags (1815). Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement in the history of ideas that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ...


On the whole his finest work is the collection of Romanzen vom Rosenkranz (published posthumously in 1852); his short stories, and more especially the charming Geschichte vom braven Kasperl und dem schönen Annerl (1838), which has been translated into English, were very popular. Brentano also assisted Ludwig Achim von Arnim, his brother-in-law, in the collection of folk-songs forming Des Knaben Wunderhorn (1806-1808). Des Knaben Wunderhorn (The Young Boys Magic Horn) is a collection of German folk poems collected by Achim von Arnim and Clemens von Brentano and published in the 1800s. ...


Brentano's collected works, edited by his brother Christian, appeared at Frankfurt in 9 vols. (1851-1855). Selections have been edited by JB Diel (1873), M Koch (1892), and J Dohmke (1893). See JB Diel and W Kreiten, Klemens Brentano (2 vols, 1877-1878), the introduction to Koch's edition, and R Steig, A. von Arnim und K. Brentano (1894).


Poems:

  • Eingang
  • Frühlingsschrei eines Knechtes
  • Abendständchen
  • Lore Lay
  • Auf dem Rhein
  • Wiegenlied
  • An Sophie Mereau
  • Ich wollt ein Sträusslein binden
  • Der Spinnerin Lied
  • Aus einem kranken Herzen
  • Hast du nicht mein Glück gesehen?
  • Frühes Lied
  • Schwanenlied
  • Nachklänge Beethovenscher Musik
  • Romanzen vom Rosenkranz
  • Einsam will ich untergehn
  • Rückblick

Project Gutenberg has several (German) e-texts of Brentano here: http://www.gutenberg.org/catalog/world/authrec?fk_authors=882 Project Gutenberg (PG) was launched by Michael Hart in 1971 in order to provide a library, on what would later become the Internet, of free electronic versions (sometimes called e-texts) of physically existing books. ...


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Franz Brentano (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) (4794 words)
Brentano was strongly influenced by Aristotle and the Scholastics as well as by the empiricist and positivist movements of the early nineteenth century.
Brentano thought that this interpretation of his position was obviously absurd, for it would be “paradoxical to the extreme to say that a man promises to marry an ens rationis and fulfills his promise by marrying a real person” (Psychology, 385).
Brentano proposes a theory of truth that is closely connected to his theory of ‘evidence.’ For Brentano, it is judgments, i.e., mental phenomena, which are true or false.
Pioneers of Psychology [2001 Tour] - School of Education & Psychology (333 words)
Brentano was ordained a Roman Catholic priest (1864) and appointed Privatdozent (unsalaried lecturer) in philosophy (1866) and professor (1872) at the University of Würzburg.
Brentano then began writing one of his best-known and most influential works, Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkte (1874; "Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint"), in which he tried to present a systematic psychology that would be a science of the soul.
In 1874 Brentano was appointed professor at the University of Vienna.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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